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Your search for the tag 'asha'man' yielded 44 results

  • 1

    Interview: Apr 20th, 2004

    Week 6 Question

    How do the Aes Sedai of the Red Ajah "find" men who can channel?

    Robert Jordan

    We're told throughout the books that the male channelers get goose bumps whenever the females are channeling or embracing the source. However, it is continuously mentioned that the women don't know if the male Asha'man and Rand are embracing or channeling saidin. So how does the Red Ajah and Cadsuane, find male channelers and then gentle them?

    There are various ways that the effects of male channeling can be found, weaves that find the resonance of the residues of saidin. Check in Crossroads of Twilight. They do not detect the actual weaves, though, only the residues left after the weave is released. After that, it becomes a matter of detective work. Though perhaps stalking a leopard might be a better metaphor. As for Cadsuane, she has a few more tools at her disposal than other Aes Sedai, the reason for her extremely high success rate. Check Winter's Heart, and a few earlier mentions, for this one.

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  • 2

    Interview: Jun 16th, 1995

    Robert Jordan

    On the Asha'man finding Rand in Lord of Chaos, he said that they knew where Rand was. How they did know he began with the following words: "Mazrim Taim is a paranoid S.O.B." [exact quote!]. When finding out of the disappearance of Rand, and a large bunch of Aiel from Cairhien, he followed the route from Cairhien towards Tar Valon by Traveling, until he encountered Elaida's Aes Sedai. From there, he brought in the Asha'man.

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  • 3

    Interview: Oct 19th, 1998

    AOL_VBT_Tav from Indianapolis

    The TOR page says that The Path of Daggers will go into how the Asha'man are going insane. Could you possibly elaborate or give us some insight (things to note when reading) for those of us that can't wait a few days?

    Robert Jordan

    Well, you don't have to wait a few days...all you have to wait is a few hours! And, no, I'm not going to give you any special insights. You may have come across an acronym—RAFO. Need I say more?

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  • 4

    Interview: Nov 11th, 2000

    Bela the Horse from Tel'aran'rhiod

    What was the "extra bit" in The Path of Daggers? Was it the kiss or the bonding? Please help settle this long-standing dispute.

    Robert Jordan

    The kiss is necessary, because that's how they learned to do it, because that's how the fellow that developed it did it. The extra bit is something in the bonding, and you'll find out what in Winter's Heart. You should have gotten a clue, I think, in the scene where the bonding took place.

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  • 5

    Interview: Dec 12th, 2000

    CNN Chat (Verbatim)

    logain

    We know Taim isn't who he says, and so does Rand. But wasn't Logain supposed to reveal him as a liar? What happened to that?

    Robert Jordan

    Read and find out. Don't you love it, guys?

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  • 6

    Interview: Dec 12th, 2000

    CNN Chat (Verbatim)

    Elzabet

    Does the healing of the taint reverse its previous effects? Or does the victim have to live with whatever he's gotten to that point and be grateful it won't get worse?

    Robert Jordan

    The second.

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  • 7

    Interview: Dec 9th, 2002

    Question

    Why have we not seen any Aiel Asha'man?

    Robert Jordan

    The Aiel have a different tradition, as I have mentioned in the books. When a young Aiel man learns that he is beginning to channel, or thinks that he is, that is taken as sign that he has been marked out to try to kill the Dark One, and he sets out for the Blight in an attempt to do so. And given that any Black Tower recruiting party that showed up in the Waste would very likely find itself in a fight to the death fairly soon after arrival, it isn't a spot that anyone would pick for recruiting. Now, it may be that some Aiel may finally join the Asha'man (I'm not saying they will!) but traditions are hard to change, especially when they have religious overtones and have lasted a few thousand years.

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  • 8

    Interview: Apr 6th, 2001

    Moridin

    When/if Rand manages to remove the taint placed on saidin, are the people infected with it cured? Or does their condition remain the way it is?

    Robert Jordan

    When/if the taint is removed from saidin, further ill effects are stopped but what has already occurred remains.

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  • 9

    Interview: Jan 7th, 2003

    Question

    How did Taim track Rand down for the battle of Dumai’s Wells?

    Robert Jordan

    That ones easy, son! C’mon. At that point, Taim was trying to find him like the devil. He knew pretty much what had happened from the beginning. Things were happening. The Aes Sedai disappeared from Cairhien. Perrin disappeared. Rand disappeared. Taim had an idea that something very bad was going on, and when you can Travel it becomes easier to start tracking out where did these Aes Sedai go and Bingo, we got something very bad going on down here, and I’m gonna come and tear the house down. It’s very easy.

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  • 10

    Interview: Jan 7th, 2003

    Question

    [How] did Taim track Rand down for the battle of Dumai’s Wells?

    Robert Jordan

    That ones easy, son! C’mon. At that point, Taim was trying to find him like the devil. He knew pretty much what had happened from the beginning. Things were happening. The Aes Sedai disappeared from Cairhien. Perrin disappeared. Rand disappeared. Taim had an idea that something very bad was going on, and when you can Travel it becomes easier to start tracking down where did these Aes Sedai go and Bingo, we got something very bad going on down here, and I’m gonna come and tear the house down. It’s very easy.

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  • 11

    Interview: Jan 28th, 2003

    Lady Voldemort

    Is it possible for an Aes Sedai to bond someone Asha'man style?

    Robert Jordan

    Yes, if they learned the weaves. The Asha'man know a lot more about bonding than the Aes Sedai. Some guy figured out how to bond their wives, and then they started concentrating on other things they could do with the bond. The Aes Sedai never experimented, just passed on what they knew.

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  • 12

    Interview: Apr 27th, 2004

    Wotmania Interview (Verbatim)

    Wotmania

    Does forkroot work with male channelers, too?

    Robert Jordan

    RAFO.

    Footnote

    Tylee notes in Knife of Dreams Chapter 4 that men also have been caught with forkroot, so it does work on men who can channel.

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  • 13

    Interview: Sep 2nd, 2005

    Question

    I know the male side of the source is clean but those who were driven mad before, will they be cured?

    Robert Jordan

    No. Whatever the degree of taint channelers have won't change. (They won't get more.)

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  • 14

    Interview: Sep 2nd, 2005

    Zaela Sedai

    Did Taim have motives for coming to Andor after he escaped the Aes Sedai?

    Robert Jordan

    Ta-eem (he said it phonetically). [Don't know how to write down how to say it, but it's not how most people say it.] Sure, he is a man who can channel. The Aes Sedai see him as a man who can channel. They will hunt him down and gentle him if they can. He has one safe haven in the world. A place were there are more men like him. Just maybe, if there are enough men like him, the Aes Sedai won't be able to come after him.

    Isabel

    (Sorry Sodas, but at least he didn't complete wipe out YOUR theory.)

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  • 15

    Interview: Sep 4th, 2005

    Question

    Do males with the spark also become wilders with blocks then?

    Robert Jordan

    It depends, a woman born with the spark that doesn't get trained, she may become a wilder, she may or may not have a block, but quite often does. A man born with a spark is probably much more likely to go up and become a false Dragon, frankly, but uh, at least before the Black Tower opened up for business. But there are blocks among the men as well. We had one of the characters, one of the men who was one of the first Asha'man, one of the first to come to the Black Tower and is since deceased. He would not believe that what he channeled at, that he could affect anything he could not see. Thus he limited the range, he could not thus make a lightning bolt that hit on the other side of the hill because he could not see.

    Matt Hatch

    [Tape ended] Other side, Jordan discussed the Land of Madmen, that blocks in men were one of the reason the isle/continent still remains.

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  • 16

    Interview: Oct 2nd, 2005

    Robert Jordan

    For Lucky Day, Asha'man have varying degrees of ability with the sword, just like anyone else. There has to be a certain level of talent for anyone to reach a particular level of skill, and also there is the question of how hard a particular person might try at learning the word. After all, he can channel, right? Sword? I don't need no stinking sword, gringo!

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  • 17

    Interview: Oct 13th, 2005

    Allen Bryan

    Is the Asha'man bond involuntarily linking?

    Robert Jordan

    No.

    Allen Bryan

    (Waste of a good question; that's in the FAQ.)

    Footnote

    This actually appears to be one of the things the FAQ was incorrect on. The first edition glossary entry for linking in A Crown of Swords suggests that RJ had the Black Ajah method of forced linking in mind. The glossary reference was removed in later editions, however, and the practice was not mentioned again until Knife of Dreams.

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  • 18

    Interview: Oct 24th, 2005

    Question

    The NEXT guy asked how the bond the Asha'man use is different than the Warder bond of the Aes Sedai.

    Robert Jordan

    He explained that the bond is different because it contains that "extra bit" about obedience. Aes Sedai bound to Asha'man are compelled to comply with the demands of the men. While Aes Sedai can do this to their Warders, it requires work each time. He mentioned that Logain thinks that extra bit can be easily removed, but that the Asha'man feel this is EXTREMELY necessary. A Warder would not kill his Aes Sedai when she turned her back, but the Asha'man have NO such safety with their bound Aes Sedai.

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  • 19

    Interview: Oct 24th, 2005

    Fomu

    One question that I found interesting, although it slipped my mind last evening, if only for RJ's slick response. The question was about the differences between the Warder bond and the Asha'man bonding of an Aes Sedai.

    Robert Jordan

    From a mechanical standpoint, RJ explained that the bonds themselves are very different weaves, but that is more because of the differences in the situations. It is very unlikely that a Warder would ever try and kill their Aes Sedai, but that is not the case for an Asha'man and his bonded Aes Sedai. The Asha'man bond requires obedience of the Aes Sedai because the Asha'man would be in danger of her if she did not obey his every command. The Warder bond is different in that the Aes Sedai can bend her Warder to her will, but only with some effort on her part.

    RJ quoted from his own book how Logain stated that the Asha'man bond could be easily modified so that the obedience requirement was removed, and here is the important part and I will quote from memory, "but that has not happened, thus far."

    Fomu

    Those last two words were said with his head turning away from the microphone and with a pause before they were said. I'm not trying to be a conspiracy theorist here, but maybe this is RJ's way of saying we'll see an example of a more equitable bonding between Asha'man and Aes Sedai in the future.

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  • 20

    Interview: Nov 17th, 2009

    Question

    Was the Warder bond originally created to control male channelers?

    Brandon Sanderson

    RAFO.

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  • 21

    Interview: Nov 17th, 2009

    Question

    Will we see Nynaeve Heal the darkness that is in some of the male channelers before the Cleansing?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Nynaeve has said before, and believes, that everything can and should be able to be Healed, except for maybe death, and she certainly believes that it is possible. I'm not going to say whether or not it will happen.

    Footnote

    Nynaeve Healed Naeff's madness in Towers of Midnight 15, and spoke of Healing other Asha'man as well. Since RJ said that the One Power can't be used to Heal insanity, this has led to some heated discussion. Those inclined to give Brandon the benefit of the doubt have suggested that what Nynaeve did wasn't technically Healing (she did specify that she didn't use Healing weaves).

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  • 22

    Interview: Nov 21st, 2009

    Matt Hatch

    Ok, we’ll move on from there. Were male channelers across Randland able to feel Rand's use of the male Choedan Kal when he destroyed it atop Dragonmount?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I would certainly think they would have been able to, consistent with what has happened before.

    Matt Hatch

    But did they know that it was destroyed? Is that what they felt, or was it just the use of?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I do not believe the destruction of a sa’angreal would be the type of event that you would be able to notice. It is not consistent with what we have seen before.

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  • 23

    Interview: Nov 15th, 2009

    Question

    Has Cadsuane met Min's vision regarding the lesson she must teach Rand and the Asha'man, which they won't like one bit?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Part of it.

    Freelancer

    (That strongly suggests that the "laughter and tears" connection is valid.)

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  • 24

    Interview: Apr 22nd, 2009

    Richard Fife

    So, after we finally forced ourselves up, I had the wonderful and great treat of striking up conversation with Alan, a kindred computer wrangler. We then went to the bar (gratefully of the OPEN variety) and had drinks, and additionally were joined by Wilson. That was in general a wonderful conversation that covered many many many things, from all topics in life and WoT. I will tell you one thing though. What eventually came from the discussion and later into "the know", we have deduced and decided the proper way for Asha'man pins to be worn. The sword is on the left collar, with the blade pointed towards your chin (and thus the curve of the blade opening up.) The dragon is on the right collar, facing your chin as well.

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  • 25

    Interview: May 5th, 2010

    Richard Fife

    Wow. I've heard that story a few times now, and it still gives me chills. So, on a lighter topic, tell me exactly how Asha'man pins are worn. (Note: I'm currently wearing mine with the sword on my left, the dragon on my right).

    Wilson Grooms

    I thought you were wearing them correctly, but from my recollection of our military stuff Jim would never put a blade toward the neck. That is because we learned how to handle blades safely. They are a weapon and a tool, but not something to be feared because you have to handle them, but you have to know how to handle them. A blade was never drawn unless you intended to do something with it, either working with it as a tool or to do someone harm. So the symbolism of putting the blade toward the throat, I think, would have been contrary to what he was like.

    But it was never really discussed in the books. They were on the collars. I say go with what feels right. If the dragon closer to your heart feels right, then wear it closer to your heart. If the sword feels closer to your heart, then go that way. But, he never said, but I would point the blade away from the neck.

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  • 26

    Interview: May 5th, 2010

    Richard Fife

    Addendum: After the interview, Wilson and I went and talked with a few other people, and one of them was wearing a shirt that had the Asha'man pins screen printed on it. The discussion came back up, and I suggested that the sword towards the throat might have been meant as a reminder of the life-and-death struggle of saidin, and Wilson said he liked that idea, but would still personally keep the sword facing away.

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  • 27

    Interview: Dec, 2010

    Lordjuss

    Did Naeff bond Nelavaire or was it the other way around? Where did she come from—was she one of Cadsuane's companions or one of Toveine's assault force?

    Brandon Sanderson

    The other way around, and neither. Nelavaire is one of the 23 Aes Sedai who were captured at Dumai's Wells and later swore fealty to Rand.

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  • 28

    Interview: Apr 17th, 2011

    Terez (Wetlandernw)

    What did Cadsuane use to blackmail Flinn, Narishma, and Manfor?

    Brandon Sanderson

    RAFO. ... That one’s mostly a MAFO. I’ll be honest. That’s a question I should have looked at.

    Terez

    Yeah, I figured it was; I was hoping actually to catch Maria on that one. That was from Wetlander from tor.com.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Oh, was it? Hi Wetlander! That’s one I should know. I’m pretty sure it’s in there somewhere. That’s one I should have looked up, but I’ve just never looked it up. So...

    Maria Simons

    A quote from the notes: "For the men, it would have been at least partly a matter of blackmail. They are distrusting of Rand, and also of Taim to various degrees; none thinks it's safe to go back to the Black Tower; they are known in Cairhien as men who can channel, and also elsewhere, making them marked to an extent, at least on their own."

    So it wasn't anything really hidden, it was just "let us bond you and we'll help you; otherwise you’re all on your own." And it was Hopwil, not Manfor, who was in the first group bonded.

    Footnote—Terez

    I took the three names from Taim's list of "deserters" given to Rand by Logain in Crossroads of Twilight, Chapter 24; Cadsuane wasn't too specific: "Blackmail was a tool she disliked using, but she had already used it on the three Asha'man..." That was in Winter's Heart Chapter 13; she told Rand about the three bonded Asha'man in Chapter 25, and indeed Karldin Manfor was not among those three.

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  • 29

    Interview: Nov 16th, 2010

    Jonathan B

    I asked about why Grady didn't tie off the gateways to move Perrin's troops if he was too tired to keep them open.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Brandon says that this was part of the instructions he had, so he didn't want to change it (my speculation is that I think that means it was probably in the notes themselves but I don't know that for sure). He said that it makes sense for tying off gateways to have a cost for the channeler to maintain because if it were so easy to create gateways and tie them off, it could be very breaking for the logistics of the world. If this were possible in the Age of Legends for example, why would anyone need a horse or a wagon or to develop any other kind of technology to transport anything? There could just be tied off gateways from everywhere to everywhere else.

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  • 30

    Interview: Nov 11th, 2011

    Wetlandernw

    Did you ever find out what were the means & end of Cadsuane's blackmailing the Asha'man?

    Brandon Sanderson

    It's all in the notes, but I'd have to look it up before I could answer.

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  • 31

    Interview: Nov 19th, 2011

    Question

    Anything new on Cadsuane's blackmail of the Asha'man?

    Brandon Sanderson

    No.

    Footnote

    Maria answered here.

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  • 32

    Interview: Oct 25th, 1994

    Edward Liu

    I told him about the theory, which someone posted, that Taim is Demandred who will eventually be discovered and killed with Logain replacing him.

    Robert Jordan

    He sounded interested at first, but then he laughed (I think about the part of Logain replacing him as the teacher of the Asha'man). And of course he said, "Read and find out."

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  • 33

    Interview: Apr, 2012

    Eleanor

    Why is such a big deal made about the silence from the Black Tower when Nynaeve reached them without fuss?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Myrelle wasn't inside the grounds. They had been locked out.

    ELEANOR

    This one should have been caught on my filters. Realised it as soon as it came out.

    FOOTNOTE—LUCKERS

    This isn't actually the answer; this is the problem. Why is there a silence when the Rebel embassy can be easily reached by gateway and vice versa? To quote Romanda, "They should have at least sent word. This silence is disturbing." That was the point behind the question—why is there such a big deal made when Nynaeve could reach them without fuss?

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  • 34

    Interview: Nov 7th, 2010

    RDDK

    I asked for clarification of Aiel male channelers.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Brandon said that once they learned the taint was cleansed, no Aiel men were/would be sent to the Blight.

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  • 35

    Interview: 2011

    Twitter 2011 (WoT) (Verbatim)

    Lira Leirner (18 March 2011)

    What's the difference between a Dreadlord and Black Ajah or Darkfriend Asha'man?

    Brandon Sanderson (21 March 2011)

    I believe that "Dreadlord" is actually a battle title, more like "general" or the like. They lead the Shadow's forces in war.

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  • 36

    Interview: Nov 27th, 2000

    Fairfax McCandlish

    This was my first RJ signing, at a Tower Books. While I was getting The Path of Daggers and Winter's Heart signed, I asked RJ how Narishma could have channeled inside Far Madding to set off their alarms (or was he outside but within the range of the detection ter'angreal)?

    Robert Jordan

    He corrected me that it was Flinn who channeled (I haven't reread that part of the book yet, and was taking the Seafolk channeler's word on it, as I recalled it), and that he did indeed do so outside the range of the blocking field, but inside the detection range.

    Footnote

    It was Narishma who channeled outside the city. Flinn pretended to channel in the scene where Cadsuane used her Well and Nynaeve's to get Rand out of prison.

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  • 37

    Interview: 2013

    Twitter 2013 (WoT) (Verbatim)

    Kamarile Sedai (23 January 2013)

    Brandon, does the Oath Rod continue to be used in the Fourth Age? If so, for what purpose?

    Brandon Sanderson (23 January 2013)

    So far as I know, yes. And for the same purpose.

    Raj Iyer

    Do other groups start using the Rod too?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Do you think the Aes Sedai are likely to let others manhandle one of their ter'angreal?

    Kamarile Sedai

    Did men start to use the Oath Rod too, or did it continue to be only women?

    Brandon Sanderson

    No men. Neither group would like that. The Asha'man are NOT male Aes Sedai. RJ was clear about this in the notes.

    Keith Martin

    Will the White and Black Towers reunite to form one Aes Sedai again?

    Brandon Sanderson

    RJ was clear to me that the Asha'man were not Aes Sedai, and were not going to become them.

    Brandon Sanderson

    That said, a united male/female Aes Sedai will come again someday.

    Footnote

    Brandon is probably not referring to the 4th Age in his last tweet; more likely he's talking about the next turning of the Wheel.

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  • 38

    Interview: Feb 9th, 2013

    Birgit (@43)

    Will the type of telepathy that Pevara and Androl share through their bond be affected/impacted by distance?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Brandon answered (paraphrasing) that distance would affect the strength of their communication.

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  • 39

    Interview: Feb 22nd, 2013

    Terez

    Alright, is Cadsuane's lesson to the Asha'man yet to come?

    Brandon Sanderson

    To the Asha'man? It is the same lesson that Rand learned, but they....they started to learn it.....

    Terez

    Yeah...

    Brandon Sanderson

    I would say that they have not completely learned it yet. Not until they have spent years...um...growing...

    Terez

    Well the distinction in Min's viewing is that none of them would like learning it from Cadsuane.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yes. Mmmhmm.

    Terez

    Yeah, so that's where everybody gets a little bit confused.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yeah.

    Terez

    But yeah, I got you.

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  • 40

    Interview: Feb 22nd, 2013

    Question

    Androl—is he yours?

    Brandon Sanderson

    He is mine. From the beginning, I asked Team Jordan if there was an Asha'man that had a blank slate that I could take over, because I wanted to have a viewpoint in the Black Tower, and I wanted to do some of these things with gateways.

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  • 41

    Interview: Feb 22nd, 2013

    Question

    Do we have any estimate on how many Asha'man and Aes Sedai survived? That's a Wetlander question.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Many. We'll put a lot of that in the Encyclopedia.

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  • 42

    Interview: Nov 1st, 2013

    Brandon Sanderson

    Androl and Pevara

    In working on the Black Tower plot, one thing I realized early on was that I wanted a new viewpoint character to be involved. One reason was that we didn't have anyone to really show the lives of the everyday members of the Black Tower. It felt like a hole in the viewpoint mosaic for the series. In addition, each Wheel of Time book—almost without exception—has either introduced a new viewpoint character or added a great deal of depth to a character who had only seen minimal use before. As we were drawing near to the end of the series, I didn't want to expand this very far. However, I did want to add at least one character across the three books I was doing.

    I went to Team Jordan with the suggestion that I could fulfill both of these purposes by using one of the rank-and-file members of the Black Tower, preferably someone who wasn't a full Asha'man and was something of a blank slate. They suggested Androl. The notes were silent regarding him, and while he had been around, he so far hadn't had the spotlight on him. He seemed the perfect character to dig into.

    A few more things got spun into this sequence. One was my desire to expand the usage of gateways in the series. For years, as an aspiring writer, I imagined how I would use gateways if writing a book that included them. I went so far as to include in the Stormlight Archive a magic system built around a similar teleportation mechanic. Being able to work on the Wheel of Time was a thrill for many reasons, but one big one was that it let me play with one of my favorite magic systems and nudge it in a few new directions. I've said that I didn't want to make a large number of new weaves, but instead find ways to use established weaves in new ways. I also liked the idea of expanding on the system for people who have a specific talent in certain areas of the One Power.

    Androl became my gateway expert. Another vital key in building him came from Harriet, who mailed me a long article about a leatherworker she found in Mr. Jordan's notes. She said, "He was planning to use this somewhere, but we don't know where."

    One final piece for his storyline came during my rereads of the series, where I felt that at times the fandom had been too down on the Red Ajah. True, they had some serious problems with their leadership in the books, but their purpose was noble. I feel that many readers wanted to treat them as the Wheel of Time equivalent of Slytherin—the house of no-goods, with every member a various form of nasty. Robert Jordan himself worked to counteract this, adding a great deal of depth to the Ajah by introducing Pevara. She had long been one of my favorite side characters, and I wanted her to have a strong plot in the last books. Building a relationship between her and Androl felt very natural to me, as it not only allowed me to explore the bonding process, but also let me work a small romance into the last three books—another thing that was present in most Wheel of Time books. The ways I pushed the Androl/Pevara bond was also something of an exploration and experiment. Though this was suggested by the things Robert Jordan wrote, I did have some freedom in how to adapt it. I felt that paralleling the wolf bond made sense, with (of course) its own distinctions.

    Finding a place to put the Pevara/Androl sequence into the books, however, proved difficult. Towers of Midnight was the book where we suffered the biggest time crunch. That was the novel where I'd plotted to put most of the Black Tower sequence, but in the end it didn't fit—partially because we just didn't have time for me to write it. So, while I did finish some chapters to put there, the soul of the sequence got pushed off to A Memory of Light, if I managed to find time for it.

    I did find time—in part because of cutting the Perrin sequence. Losing those 17,000 words left an imbalance to the pacing of the final book. It needed a plot sequence with more specific tension to balance out the more sweeping sequences early in the book where characters plan, plot, and argue. I was able to expand Androl/Pevara to fit this hole, and to show a lot of things I really wanted to show in the books.

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  • 43

    Interview: Nov 1st, 2013

    Brandon Sanderson

    Rand and Logain

    I made a few interesting decisions with the Black Tower sequence. The first was to not involve Rand. Though it would have been a nice narrative balance to have Rand come save the Asha'man in contrast to them saving him in book six, I felt that Rand was riding to the rescue too often. The Black Tower was about to lose him permanently, and if its members could not face their problems on their own, then thematically they'd be left at the end of the series hampered and undermined. Beyond this, I believed that Rand's personality (as shown in earlier books) would push him to avoid being pulled into a potential trap at the Black Tower. His argument that he couldn't risk a confrontation is a good one. Androl and company had to face their problems on their own—save for the help of an Aes Sedai, another thing I felt to be thematically important.

    Perhaps the most controversial decision (among Team Jordan) that I made with this sequence was to push Logain toward being a darker figure. Following his extended torture, I felt that Logain would emerge as a different person—though he'd always been somewhat dark. Some members of Team Jordan felt he was past that, and I disagreed. Logan was a false Dragon, gentled then healed, head of a group of men going insane who owed loyalty to Rand—but who rarely interacted with him. There is so much going on with this guy that he could have carried an entire series on his own.

    I wanted him to wrestle with all of this. Logain's life ever since his capture way back when seemed to have been one of being shoved this way and then that. He needed to decide for himself what kind of Black Tower he was going to rule, if he was going to earn the honor of men as was promised. (And yes, this had not yet happened at the end of the series.) Logain, so far as I know, never once let go of power in the series—it was always ripped from his fingers. In this case, he was allowed to choose.

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