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Your search for the tag 'callandor' yielded 29 results

  • 1

    Interview: 2010

    Leth Filorn (13 August 2010)

    Could thirteen Aes Sedai linked shield Rand while he was channeling using Callandor? What about with Choedan Kal at full power?

    Brandon Sanderson (13 August 2010)

    I think I'm going to MAFO those. (Which means email me, say I said I'd ask Maria, and we'll add them to her list.)

    Brandon Sanderson

    I'm pretty sure of the answer, but I don't want to take the time to sort though the notes and look it up for certain while editing.

    Maria Simons

    I really don’t think so, for either, but I cannot find it specifically stated.

    Tags

  • 2

    Interview: 2011

    Twitter 2011 (WoT) (Verbatim)

    Darth Andrea (6 January 2011)

    Quick question, From RJ's Notes on Callandor, is it a straight bladed sword, or curved, single handed or hand and a half?

    Brandon Sanderson (6 January 2011)

    MAFO.

    FELIX PAX

    BWB claims Callandor is, "a crystal sword with a curved blade...." http://bit.ly/hiKltk

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Thanks, Felix. That's how I imagined it, but with things like this, I can't always rely on my memory.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Sometimes, I have incorrect biases come from years of reading and imagining.

    Tags

  • 3

    Interview: 2011

    Twitter 2011 (WoT) (Verbatim)

    Luckers (10 January 2011)

    I wonder if Whitebridge is made of spinglass. Does anyone have an answer?

    TEREZ

    I always took 'spinglass' to be a WoT way of saying 'spun glass'. Very fragile. Also...

    TEREZ

    'The man opened his mouth to protest as citizens always did; they seemed to think Aiel were made of spinglass'.

    TEREZ

    Obviously fragile is what he's getting at. Now, if you could do it like cuendillar...that's different.

    TEREZ

    Per Moghedien I get the impression there are many forms of cuendillar. Maybe iron is easiest.

    LUCKERS

    That's a good point—I missed the spinglass = fragile reference. As for cuendillar... perhaps.

    LUCKERS

    There is an argument in the same vein towards Callandor being cuendillar.

    TEREZ

    Well, people argued Callandor=cuendillar because it stopped balefire. But if Perrin can do it... :)

    LUCKERS

    There was also Osan'gar's comment during the cleansing that though the Choedan Kal would be destroyed...

    LUCKERS

    ... he'd still have Callandor. Of course he could have meant to balefire Rand and attack Narishma. Still, weird.

    KRIT PETTY

    Callandor is the most powerful sa'angreal without the Choedan Kal. He might just be noting the fact.

    LUCKERS

    It's the expectation that he would have Callandor after he balefired the hill which is significant.

    TEREZ

    He didn't say he was going to balefire the whole hill. Elza got his hill, though. ;)

    TEREZ

    Strongest Rand could manage with fat man was man-thick. He could sweep it, but it's not necessary.

    LUCKERS

    I did make that point, but it's weird, risking Narishma's response to the attack.

    LUCKERS

    Rand was distracted, why not kill Narishma first, then Rand. Also Osan'gar links the balefire to...

    LUCKERS

    ... Rand's death—"But still, he could take Callandor after al'Thor was dead."—as if it's a result.

    TEREZ

    I read it as him seeing Rand as the only real threat.

    LUCKERS

    Which is weird, in itself. Callandor circle responding to reversed webs—a scary, and impossible thing for someone from the Age of Legends.

    TEREZ

    True, but he might have figured out the ter'angreal thing like Demandred, and he was at point blank range (for balefire).

    RUTH HINCKLEY

    So if the cuendillar Egwene makes is white, why are the seals half black? Saidin-made? Different type of cuendillar?

    TEREZ

    re: black/white, I always figured this was why Elayne couldn't get the colors right with the stone ring (no man).

    Brandon Sanderson (10 January 2011)

    @WoTLuckers @Lironah @Terez27 Now that's an interesting conversation. Re: cuendillar.

    TEREZ

    lol, now I get to catalog the whole conversation because Brandon said it was interesting.

    Tags

  • 4

    Interview: Jan 14th, 1997

    Thomas Howard

    1. What do Rand's wards on Callandor ward against exactly?

    2. Are the black cords on male Forsaken the means to access to the True Power?

    3. If so, why don't the female Forsaken have them?

    Robert Jordan

    "Read and find out" on all three counts.

    THOMAS HOWARD

    Damn. I still don't think the cords have anything to do with True Power usage though.

    Tags

  • 5

    Interview: Nov 14th, 1998

    Matthew Hunter

    Where did ideas come from?

    Robert Jordan

    What if you were tapped on the shoulder and told you had to save the world?

    What are the sources of myths? "Reverse-engineered" legends.

    The game of "telephone". (He calls it "whisper").

    Proud of the little things that slip up on you, like Callandor being "the Sword in the Stone."

    Tags

  • 6

    Interview: Apr 4th, 2001

    Aan'allein

    (And then the first half of my tape was gone, and I decided to save most of the rest for the audience questions.)

    Jordan mentioned all the different cultures and myths he used in WoT. That he'd mined everything from Europe and Asia and Africa etc...

    Robert Jordan

    [first sentence paraphrased...only started taping again halfway through this] I don't know how it is in other places, but the best known legend for the American audience, that I had in mind ... when I wrote this for ... that legend is King Arthur. I would imagine that more people know the complete story of King Arthur and Guenever and the round table and the whole nine yards than know any other myth or legend, or perhaps more than know all the other myths put together. Now there are Arthurian elements in these books, but I had to try to bury them, for that reason, make them not so readily apparent. And while I had a particular part of the Arthurian legend mentioned from the first book, it was not until the third book that people began to realize what it was. In fact my editor, who is my wife, and who is a very very sharp woman, uhm, had edited the book and was writing the first version of the flap copy for the book, when she suddenly shouted down the stairs to me (if you're young, forgive me):

    [loud] You son of a bitch, you've done it it to me again! [laughter]

    Because she had suddenly spotted, not until reaching this... not until reaching the cover flap, she suddenly spotted by a... chance connection of words, this one particular Arthurian thing. [Jordan never mentioned what this was, but the logical option is of course Callandor.] And that you see, to me it's very obvious that the Arthur legend and all of the others are in there. If you spend time on the net, you find sites where they discuss these legends. [People sitting around me knowingly chuckle] I have to tell you that if you visit any of these FAQs... I haven't seen one in a couple of years, but the last time I was sent copies, I've read the printout of the FAQ, and when I was through it. And about a third of the answers in there were correct.

    Aan'allein

    [Turned the memo off here, this is well known. I did like the way he phrased the other two points here though. Something about "the second part was going in the right direction, but somewhere along the way they spotted something pretty which they followed and never arrived at drawing the conclusions they should have. As to the third part, I think it was written by people who didn't read my books at all."]

    Tags

  • 7

    Interview: Apr 8th, 2001

    Question

    In The Shadow Rising, Lanfear mentioned two sa'angreal stronger than Callandor that a male could use. Is the second one ever going to appear?

    Robert Jordan

    Read And Find Out.

    Aan'allein

    (Of course, but hey, there's no harm in trying anyway...)

    Tags

  • 8

    Interview: Jan 18th, 2003

    Question

    How do you create the names for the characters?

    Robert Jordan

    (He said a really long answer, and I will summarize it. He basically takes names from legends and twists them, mainly King Arthur. The two characters that are based after King Arthur are Artur Hawkwing, obviously, and Rand. For example, the "sword in the stone." He says that the Wheel of Time could kind of be known as the basis of where all of the legends and myths come from. He said he tried to bury King Arthur very deeply, because if people thought that The Eye of the World was just another King Arthur book, nobody would buy it.)

    Tags

  • 9

    Interview: Feb 26th, 2003

    tarvalon.net Q&A (Verbatim)

    Question

    Could a gholam have drawn Callandor?

    Robert Jordan

    Read and Find Out.

    Tags

  • 10

    Interview: Sep 4th, 2005

    Matt Hatch

    Skipped [transcription of] question to Harriet about how Jordan may have tricked her in the past, as he has done to his readers about where he was going with something or another.

    Harriet McDougal Rigney

    She focused on two incidents when he tricked her with the books. She made a point about the 'Sword in the Stone' coming to her after having read the entire book. She didn't make the connection to Arthurian legend until she was writing the flap cover [of The Dragon Reborn].

    Tags

  • 11

    Interview: Oct 28th, 2005

    Jason Wolfbrother

    Was Callandor constructed during the War of Power?

    Robert Jordan

    Yes.

    Jason Wolfbrother

    Was it used in the War of Power?

    Robert Jordan

    Yes, that is how the flaw was discovered.

    Jason Wolfbrother

    Why didn't they ward/buffer Callandor?

    Robert Jordan

    The flaw with Callandor is simply a manufacturing flaw. He went on to talk about how they were at the end of their tech age with only a few sho-wings and jo-cars left. A couple of shocklances were still around but they were not as prevalent as they had been. Anyway they had been mass producing ter'angreal, angreal, and sa'angreal, and there are bound to be flaws with the products. The flaw with Callandor is simply one such flaw.

    Footnote

    This is specifically referring to the lack of a buffer.

    Tags

  • 12

    Interview: Nov 15th, 2009

    Question

    Has Narishma fulfilled the prophecy regarding Callandor and "who draws it out shall follow after"?

    Brandon Sanderson

    RAFO.

    Tags

  • 13

    Interview: Nov 8th, 2010

    Question

    Can you give us a hint on who the second woman will be in Rand's circle? (with Callandor)

    Brandon Sanderson

    Not really, but I can give you a tiny bit of information. She has already been introduced.

    Footnote

    Tags

  • 14

    Interview: Apr 17th, 2011

    Terez

    Will we ever learn what went wrong when Narishma went to fetch Callandor?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Um...perhaps. (Terez laughs.) Was that one of yours?

    Terez

    Yes, that was.

    Brandon Sanderson

    I didn’t answer it, but I didn’t RAFO it.

    Terez

    Yeah. It’s all good.

    Tags

  • 15

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    Nikleas

    WOT question: Rereading the series right now to get ready for The Gathering Storm, currently on book 4. Has RJ included details in his notes about who made Callandor and who placed it in the Stone of Tear (and how)?

    Brandon Sanderson

    There were notes on Callandor, and the sword will play a part in the final three books. More, I cannot say. However, I'll make a note to suggest that Harriet consider this question when creating the Encyclopedia, so anything that doesn't end up in the last books is revealed there.

    Tags

  • 16

    Interview: 1993

    Hailing Frequency

    In many places in "The Wheel of time," a careful reader will spot echoes of other myth cycles—the sword in the stone, for example. Do these things happen fortuitously or are they laid on in advance, intentionally as it were?

    Robert Jordan

    Well, they were laid on in advance. There are elements from Norse, Chinese, Japanese, and American Indian mythologies, to name just a few. I think it adds resonance to the story, although I've taken great care not to follow the older material in any slavish way. Occasionally, I will add in details here or there, and then discover that I have done something that is absolutely authentic to the myth I was working from. This is not automatic writing or channeling or being guided by something from the Great Beyond, it's simply that I have done a great deal of reading on these subjects and things bubble up in the back of my head all the time.

    Tags

  • 17

    Interview: Apr, 2012

    Luckers

    Do the Forsaken know the weaves Elza used to break the warding Cadsuane placed on the Domination Band?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yes.

    LUCKERS

    So, why didn’t they use it on wardings Rand placed on Callandor, and the other things they’ve wanted that were warded earlier in the series?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    *stares at me for a long moment, thoughtfully* They may not have know them then. The thing is... we don’t see a lot of the Shadow innovating with the Power, unlike with the Light, but they have been. As much as the Light. But they know, now. The notes definitely say this.

    Tags

  • 18

    Interview: Apr, 2012

    Luckers

    Okay, so, there have been three incidences where characters have ignored the Choedan Kal in favour of Callandor—or well, not even that. Just ignored the Choedan Kal. Shaidar Haran in The Gathering Storm when Elza took the Domination Band, Solinda during Rand’s flashbacks was the one who gave the ter’angreal to the Aiel, but made no efforts to secure the Choedan Kal like Callandor, and the Aes Sedai who was looking to fight Ishamael during the breaking who took sa’angreal from the Aiel, but left the Choedan Kal. So I guess the question is...

    Brandon Sanderson

    Why are they choosing Callandor over the Choedan Kal?

    LUCKERS

    Well, not even that, really, because two of those have nothing to do with the Callandor. I guess it’s more, was there something dodgy... did they know something about the Choedan Kal... why did they leave it?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    There is a reason. It has to do with Callandor being key to the ending, and the Choedan Kal not.

    Tags

  • 19

    Interview: May, 2012

    Irene Gallo

    We are very excited to reveal the cover to A Memory of Light, the final volume of Robert Jordan’s epic fantasy series The Wheel of Time. The artwork for this final edition is by, arguably, one of today’s most beloved illustrators, Michael Whelan.

    The task of jumping into a 14 volume series on its last installment must have been a daunting one but Michael rose to the occasion. Harriet McDougal, Jordan’s editor and widow remarked, "that is the Rand I have waited to see for twenty years” when she saw the image. And while the artwork clearly has all the earmarks of a Whelan painting, its theme and coloration make it a fitting heir to Darrell K. Sweet’s series of Wheel of Time covers.

    In keeping with the series’ covers, the scene gathers elements from a key scene in the book. Here, Rand stands with Callandor on the rocks of Shayol Ghul, heading down into its depths to confront the Dark One even as the sun itself vanishes from the world. Two Aes Sedai follow the Dragon Reborn into the mouth of darkness, two women who have been with Rand since the very beginning.

    MICHAEL WHELAN

    Tags

  • 20

    Interview: May, 2012

    MRJackson@218 (7 May 2012)

    Not sure why there's still confusion. It's Nynaeve and Moiraine on the back cover. The yellow and blue dresses should make that apparent. Nynaeve's hair is obviously shorter than it used to be.

    I spoke to Michael about the cover as he was finishing it. Since he didn't have the opportunity to read all fourteen books for the assignment, I was one of the people he leaned on to fact check his work.

    Michael mentioned there are details the readers (like me) wouldn't be privy to yet. For example, Nynaeve takes the bulk of her jewelry off before this scene.

    Callandor is a sword that isn't a sword, right? He's not holding it for defense. It's a source of power as well as his source of light (there's a clue about that in the lighting on his face). He's shielding his eyes as he stares in to the pit. Apparently, the deeper he goes into Shayol Ghul, the brighter it shines.

    A little background that some might not know... Michael has studied martial arts, including Filipino Kali and Arnis. The forearm slash position actually has some utility in fights with bladed weapons.

    Compositionally, the line of the sword is another element that draws you into the intensity of Rand's stare. Further, the opening of the cave is the shape of an eye; the eclipse suggests an iris. It's as if the gaze of the Dark One is falling on Rand. We see his strength and determination in response. How many illustrators can convey that kind of depth in a scene?

    Say what you will, but I think Michael brought a lot to the plate on what was a very difficult cover assignment. He put his stamp on Rand while producing a cover that fits well with the first thirteen that DKS painted.

    analiese@222 (8 May 2012)

    Thanks for confirming that. However, Nynaeve's hair is still the wrong color and, while it's shorter after the Aes Sedai testing in Towers of Midnight, it should still be in a shoulder-length braid. She never gave up her signature braid. That's why many people don't think it looks like Nynaeve—the braid is the main thing that would identify her as Nynaeve to the readers.

    The loose light hair makes the woman on the cover look more like Alivia, who many fans believe is the woman in yellow. So I'm still of the opinion that Whelan did not do a good job with Nynaeve if longtime fans don't even recognize her. I think it's a beautiful cover, but as a reader, the main thing I care about is seeing the characters—who we have been reading about for twenty years—done right, not so much whether the cave looks realistic or happens to symbolize the Dark One spying on Rand. So it's disappointing that Nynaeve ended up virtually unrecognizable. She doesn't even wear yellow dresses in the books, despite being Yellow Ajah (she makes a point of wearing green or blue since that's what Lan likes), so that's not something that makes the woman's identity apparent either.

    If you don't mind me asking (not trying to be rude here, it just strikes me as a bit strange), why did Whelan rely on fans to check his work instead of Team Jordan? I'm assuming you work for Tor, but you refer to yourself as a reader who hasn't read the book. To what extent were Brandon Sanderson and Team Jordan involved with the creative process behind this cover?

    MRJackson@223

    I was just one of the people helping with the details. Obviously Michael had Irene Gallo's art direction and was in contact with editors including Harriet.

    Michael's wife Audrey usually serves as his sounding board, but she hadn't read the books. (For the record, I'm not affiliated with TOR. I've worked with Michael since the mid 90s, primarily on his website.) I'm a WoT fan and that's the kind of feedback Michael was looking for... someone he knew who had read the previous thirteen books.

    Michael and I did discuss Nynaeve's dress color. I mentioned that she catered to Lan's color preference of green and blue. The yellow of her Ajah usually came in slashes of color, accents if I recall correctly.

    Like I said, I haven't read the manuscript for A Memory of Light and Michael couldn't talk about it. But I distinctly recall Nynaeve taking pride in being a true Aes Sedai finally. Going into the Last Battle, I don't think it's a stretch that she would choose yellow. I suppose we'll have to RAFO on that.

    In the background information I provided, I described Nynaeve's hair color as darker brown and referenced previous covers (among them the Melanie Delon's cover for A Crown of Swords that drew criticism for being too red).

    I'd have to ask him why he chose lighter highlights. Just my speculation here, but Callandor is a light source. There's also illumination from the eclipse filtering in from the mouth of the cave to consider.

    Michael got the length of Nynaeve's hair right, and this isn't simply opinion. Hopefully Brandon or Harriet will confirm at some point that her shoulder length hair was too short to braid.

    Interestingly, Michael and I spoke about the challenge of pulling character descriptions from the text. If you're familiar with his illustration, he's known as a stickler for details. But it isn't always easy to translate text literally, especially when Jordan and Sanderson contradict in their description.

    In correspondence, Michael wrote,

    Michael Whelan

    "Major characters are described as diminutive in size, yet 'commanding' in presence. Faces are youthful, yet ageless. Or young but having eyes full of wisdom of the ages. Rand is tall and manly, yet has an almost "feminine" beauty in his eyes or mouth. It's a bit confusing how one is supposed to render such conflicting elements."

    MRJackson

    Honestly, I don't mind the nitpicking. Criticism comes with the territory. My point in responding is to state that Michael was mindful of details here. There's evidence of it in the painting. I can tell you that he had Moiraine's kesiera and Nynaeve's ki'sain accounted for before I even spoke to him.

    On a personal note, I had the privilege of meeting Robert Jordan before a signing on the Knife of Dreams tour. One of the things we talked about was the cover art for the series. I think Mr. Jordan would be pleased with this one. Obviously Harriet was when she said, "that is the Rand I have waited to see for twenty years."

    analiese@224

    Firstly, thank you very much for the thorough answer. It answered many of my questions, and it was also interesting to hear more about the creative process behind the cover.

    [Nynaeve's hair] got singed off "a handspan below her shoulders" (Towers of Midnight ch 20), and she wore a shoulder-length braid in every scene she was in after the Aes Sedai testing. That's why it seemed odd for her signature braid to be missing on the cover. I don't really care about the dress or even much about the hair color, but Nynaeve isn't Nynaeve without her braid—it's part of who she is. It's like Mat showing up without his hat and ashandarei. And the ki'sain is too small to be visible, so it doesn't do anything to make the woman on the cover look more like Nynaeve.

    I also wish Nynaeve and Moiraine hadn't been delegated to the background/back cover—since they're going to be linked with him, they deserve to stand at his side. But that's not an error, just something I wish were different.

    However, while the cover isn't what I hoped for, I understand and deeply appreciate that you and Whelan both worked incredibly hard on it, and Whelan remains one of my favorite illustrators. I think he did a wonderful job with Rand.

    MRJackson@228

    I appreciate the sentiment but Michael did the actual work. He pushed his calendar aside this spring to make the cover happen. I was just support. But I will admit it took a lot of restraint on my part not to inundate him with questions that I knew he couldn't answer, so there is that.

    As readers, we all have so much invested in this series that I completely understand what you're saying. I love Brandon's work, but I felt Towers of Midnight was a bit of a letdown, especially the resolution with Moiraine.

    Moiraine has always been a favorite of mine. I would have liked to see her on the front cover as well. Thankfully Dan Dos Santos gave us that in his brilliant cover for The Fires of Heaven.

    Wetlandernw@227

    I think MRJackson & Mr. Whelan made a very good point, in that we have not yet read this book. By the time this scene happens, we may see several other events that make sense of the seeming discrepancies. Specifically, there are only two scenes after Nynaeve's testing which mention her braid, and in both cases it is specifically noted that it is too short and she finds it quite annoying. Quite possibly she'll meet up with Lan and find out that he likes it loose, or she'll simply decide that it's too irritating to fuss with a too-short braid, and we'll see her with loose hair in several scenes before this.

    Someone was bothered earlier by the missing jewelry—but now we know that she specifically and deliberately removed the jewelry before this scene, probably so that someone else could use them. (That's what happened during the Cleansing; why not here as well?) Seems to me that we should make the assumption that the same kind of thing might happen with The Braid, instead of insisting that she should look like she did in the previous book, and claiming any discrepancies as mistakes. Such claims are not only rude, they are unfounded. Once the book is out and we've read the whole thing, we might have grounds for nitpicking; until then, not so much.

    MRJackson—Thank you for your contributions, both to this thread and to Mr. Whelan.

    MRJackson@230 (9 May 2012)

    Glad to be of help. Maybe someday we'll find closure in the great braid debate...

    Seriously though, Michael painted Nynaeve's hair at that length (without a braid) for a reason. I wasn't trying to sidestep debate. I was expressing certainty. Michael was aware that the braid was an identifying feature of her character. The painting turned out the way it did through a long process that involved editorial input. I'll leave it at that.

    I look at it this way (and this is my opinion)... Nynaeve has grown enormously through the books. She was always uniquely powerful, but it took time for her to grow into that power. More so, it took a dozen books to accept herself and decide who she wanted to be.

    Nynaeve worked through enormous difficulty to channel reliably. Remember how she used to tug on that braid? It really was a symbol of who she used to be. Kind of fitting that the symbol is gone.

    Old habits die hard, of course, but she isn't that girl tugging on her braid any more. She's a woman who fought to gain acceptance as an Aes Sedai, and she's going to stand at Rand side to face the Dark One. It's impressive how far she's come as a character.

    analiese@

    The Fires of Heaven ebook cover was definitely one of the best, though there were a few things the artist got wrong (Moiraine does not have blue eyes). The New Spring cover was great too, especially Lan. It's mostly Nynaeve who has suffered bad luck with the ebook covers. There's A Crown of Swords where she got red hair and Lan looked like an underwater zombie, Winter's Heart where she didn't appear at all despite being linked with Rand for the Cleansing, The Path of Daggers where she got a Saldaean nose and Elayne looked suspiciously like Jean Grey...

    I think much of my disappointment with the A Memory of Light cover stems from the fact that there's already an earlier cover (Winter's Heart) where Rand claimed the stage and his female linking partner was left out. "Hero poses manfully brandishing some kind of phallic object" is a pretty tired concept, especially on WoT covers. Rand does the same on Sweet's The Dragon Reborn and The Path of Daggers, the ebook covers for The Dragon Reborn, Winter's Heart, Knife of Dreams... Winter's Heart is probably the worst offender, if you look at the placement of the Choedan Kal. ;)

    Sweet's A Memory of Light cover was a welcome break from that—I'm not usually a fan of Sweet's covers, but I liked that he gave Elayne, Min, and Aviendha a prominent role and added some emotion to the cover. So I really would have liked to see something different on the final cover, like Rand having the two women from the Callandor circle at his side. Here, Nynaeve and Moiraine are present, but only in the background, and not at all on the ebook cover.

    MRJackson@236

    The only female lead who held the cover spotlight on par with the men was Moiraine, and that is a shame.

    There was definitely opportunity to feature Nynaeve linked with Rand on Winter's Heart. Despite the hair, I liked Nynaeve on the cover of A Crown of Swords. Lan not so much. The Path of Daggers was another miss, mostly because the colors were a distraction. I thought I was looking at an X-Men cover. Even if that was intentional, it didn't work for me.

    I can only assume Rand was intended to stand at center stage alone on the last cover, but I think what you suggest would have been great too. Moiraine and Nynaeve definitely earned their place at Rand's side on the front.

    ViciousCircle@264

    That was a beautiful description of why Nynaeve is one of the most compelling characters in the series. She and Moiraine kept me invested during some dark years of almost giving up on WOT. I always hoped they would be the other Callandor channelers, as I could not imagine Rand putting himself in such a vulnerable position with anyone else. Aviendha, Min and Elayne included, though I do love Aviendha! So thank you for shedding light on why some things are portrayed as they are on this excellent new cover. Just don't think that it will put a dent in the debate. ;)

    MRJackson@266

    Thanks. I feel much the same way about those characters, and I'm sure the debate will keep going on well after the publication of A Memory of Light.

    Tags

  • 21

    Interview: May, 2012

    MarioInOttawa@265 ()

    Anyone know why his left hand is hidden? I think it is because his hand grows back and they didn't want to give that part away (The Dragon Reborn is causing all sorts of broken things to go good again).

    MRJackson@266

    Nice thought but Michael was just hiding the stump.

    Tags

  • 22

    Interview: 2013

    Twitter 2013 (WoT) (Verbatim)

    The Sandwich Man (13 January 2013)

    Just read A Memory of Light, one of my all-time favorites. But for clarification, what, exactly, did Rand do to seal the Bore?

    Brandon Sanderson (13 January 2013)

    I want to avoid spoilers on my feed, if possible. But it involved access to something Lews Therin did not have.

    Tags

  • 23

    Interview: 2013

    Twitter 2013 (WoT) (Verbatim)

    Dennis (23 January 2013)

    When did Rand tell Moiraine and Nynaeve the "Plan" re: Callandor? They didn't know when they got to Shayol Ghul, right?

    Brandon Sanderson (23 January 2013)

    They knew some things.

    Tags

  • 24

    Interview: 2013

    Twitter 2013 (WoT) (Verbatim)

    Joakim Backlund (23 January 2013)

    Was there any details to how Callandor was created in the notes RJ left?

    Brandon Sanderson (23 January 2013)

    Yes, there were some. I might try to get more in the encyclopedia.

    Tags

  • 25

    Interview: Feb 20th, 2013

    Question

    Was the flaw in Callandor deliberate?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yes, Callandor was deliberately designed as a trap.

    Question

    Could a woman channel the True Power through Callandor?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I don't believe so—MAFO (ask Maria and find out).

    Tags

  • 26

    Interview: Feb 20th, 2013

    Question

    Getting back to Callandor, we know that you have to channel the appropriate power though a seed—saidin or saidar. So I was wondering how Callandor got True Power capability. Is it because of the flaw, or did someone channel the True Power through the seed at the time it was created?

    Brandon Sanderson

    That's an excellent question to which I do not have the answer. It's not one I had considered.

    Question

    Somebody had said when I posted in the Facebook re-readers group that there is a theory that the capability might be due to the Taint, but I wasn't sure that was the case.

    Brandon Sanderson

    I believe it was made intentionally to do what it did for a specific use. Not what it ended up being used for. I don't think it was used for that. I think it was built—you're going to have to clear it with Maria—I think it was built to be a trap for one of the male Forsaken.

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  • 27

    Interview: Feb 22nd, 2013

    Question

    From Freelancer, Can you speak to how and when a True Power sa'angreal was created?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I believe that such a thing, you'll have to check with Maria to make sure that I'm not saying anything wrong, but I believe that this thing was created as a trap for one of the Forsaken.

    Question

    I think what he is more after, is once we have had the talk about the seed for a sa'angreal...

    Brandon Sanderson

    Uh, huh. How did that happen? That I am not talking too much about.

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  • 28

    Interview: Feb 22nd, 2013

    J. Dauro

    Do we know anything on how they managed to create the wards on Callandor, and attune them to Rand?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I don't.

    J. Dauro

    Then I guess I'll have to ask Maria at JordanCon.

    Tags