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Your search for the tag 'crossroads of twilight' yielded 36 results

  • 1

    Interview: Aug 23rd, 2002

    Robert Jordan

    Some disturbing news came my way today. I understand that people are making posts at Dragonmount asking where they can get free copies of 'Glimmers', and others are e-mailing copies of 'Glimmers' to them. Wotmania, the other site that partnered with Simon & Schuster in this, has yanked people's memberships for doing this.

    The simple fact is, anybody who gives away a copy of 'Glimmers' or accepts one is engaging in theft. Stealing. No different from shoplifting, and only a degree removed from holding up a liquor store.

    I've heard the arguments about how information should be free, especially in electronic media, but they all boil down to excuses as to why some people believe they can take what somebody else has created, but not pay for it. And if you think that the fact that an e-book is "only a copy of the original" or that "the author loses nothing because he still has his original," would anyone think they had a right to take a book to the copy-shop and then hand out the copies they made? I'd think they might see that every copy they give away is a copy that the author won't be able to sell. In other words, they have just stolen that royalty right out of the author's pocket.

    Real-world and immediate, I suggest that anyone who believes they aren't stealing when they hand around copies of 'Glimmers' should walk into any mall shop and try walking out with their favorite posters. Without paying for it, of course. If anyone tries to stop them, they should just explain that they are only taking a copy. But they should be sure to have money in hand to pay their bail.

    Various publishers have approached me wanting to publish the entire Wheel of Time as a series of e-books, but I always say no. One reason is that technology isn't mature enough. Another is the number of people who download e-books and proceed to give away copies. Maybe that makes them feel generous. It makes me feel that I will never allow e-book publication of WHEEL, and maybe not of anything else, either.

    Robert Jordan

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  • 2

    Interview: Aug 22nd, 2002

    Dragonmount

    Amazon.com now lists Crossroads of Twilight as having a January 7, 2003 release date. Originally it was set to be released on November 12, 2002, but it has been pushed back at Robert Jordan's request.

    Tor books was the first to confirm to us that it has been delayed because Robert Jordan wants to make sure he has enough time to make it just right. They would not comment on the exact release date yet.

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  • 3

    Interview: Aug 22nd, 2002

    Dragonmount

    In addition, Robert Jordan himself filled us in on the reasons for the change in date:

    Robert Jordan

    I asked [Tor Books] to shift the book to January, a move we had discussed several months ago as a possibility. We have been working on a very tight schedule lately, with me hoping to finish the book by September 30, the positively absolute latest date which would allow for the original November 12 [publishing] date. I still don't know whether I will make September 30, and with Tor beginning to plan a November tour, I began to see the possibility of a huge explosion of disappointment if I was as much as a week late. That week would make it impossible to make November 12 and necessitate rescheduling the entire tour. Or more likely, canceling it, since there just wouldn't be time to reschedule. The only way to keep from getting ulcers over the situation was to reschedule the book, and that's what I told [Tor]. So, I am working away, and will finish as soon as I can. And maybe for once, my editor and I will have a little time to look over the book as a whole together instead of being forced to rely on the chapter-by-chapter as-I-hand-them-in sort of editing.

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  • 4

    Interview: Jan 11th, 2003

    Robert Jordan

    When asked if he keeps notes to remember all of the plotlines, he stated that he does not—he tracks them all in his head. This seems relatively plausible given that we know from other sources that his IQ is well over 160. When fleshing out the novel before beginning, he did state that he makes a summary or jots a few notes on what and where he wants to go with the book. However, he is always forced to leave out material—to make Crossroads of Twilight fully comprehensive, he required 1200 to 1300 pages, nearly twice the length of the final total.

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  • 5

    Interview: Jan 15th, 2003

    Question

    [indistinct]

    Robert Jordan

    They're still there. (Woman asks a second question) Because they're not being as used as much. If you could see what ... done in Crossroads [editor's note: I'm assuming he meant the book], they're still there.

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  • 6

    Interview: Jan 18th, 2003

    Robert Jordan

    There are many clues as to Mesaana's identity, enough that we should figure it out before Crossroads of Twilight. He basically said that he'd full-out reveal her in upcoming books, though, "...and if you still don't know, well, you'll find out later."

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  • 7

    Interview: Jan 21st, 2003

    SFRevu Interview (Verbatim)

    Ernest Lilley

    Is there anything else we should talk about?

    Robert Jordan

    Well, no...except to once again emphasize that you cannot start with Crossroads of Twilight. You must begin with The Eye of the World (laughs).

    Ernest Lilley

    And The Eye of the World can stand on its own.

    Robert Jordan

    Yes, and you don't have to go on, but it is the beginning and you learn things. I don't try to repeat the character's lessons. I simply assume in the later books that you have read what has gone before. You will know.

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  • 8

    Interview: Jan 23rd, 2003

    John Nowacki

    I asked a couple of questions, one of them from Zeynep's list. How much time elapsed between the last chapter of Crossroads of Twilight and the epilogue?

    Robert Jordan

    He thought for a second before giving an RAFO and adding it was not that much, certainly not months.

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  • 9

    Interview: Jan 23rd, 2003

    Zeynep Dilli

    Here's a compilation of questions asked, some of which were from RASFWR-J through me or John.

    How much time elapsed between the last chapter of Crossroads of Twilight and the epilogue?

    Robert Jordan

    (from John Nowacki's report): He thought for a second before giving an RAFO and adding it was not that much, certainly not months.

    Zeynep Dilli

    What he said.

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  • 10

    Interview: Feb, 2003

    Bill Thompson

    Now is it fair to say that in this volume there is more thinking, less action?

    Robert Jordan

    A little bit. Somewhat less action, yes. I'm not certain that you could say there is less action, let's say there is less "slam-bang" action. A lot of things happen, but none of it is very grandiose and noisy.

    Bill Thompson

    The reason I bring this up, I don't know if you read your reader reviews on Amazon?

    Robert Jordan

    I do not.

    Bill Thompson

    Many of your very most loyal readers seem disappointed with this book because there is a lot of things happening in the mind, or in characters' heads, and not so much on the battlefields any more.

    Robert Jordan

    Well there have been battlefields, and there will be battlefields. But I do not to set out to write a story that is a series of battles. There are many things that have to happen, and some of the things that have to happen are quieter, if no less deadly.

    Bill Thompson

    This comes back to what we were saying a moment ago: that there is an arc of a story to all of your books, and that each individual book may be very different in content from the books that came before it and the books that came after it.

    Robert Jordan

    Yes.

    Bill Thompson

    This is what you've got clearly in your mind, at least. I will say this: you've got many five-star reviews on Amazon. Some of your readers get that.

    Robert Jordan

    Well, good. I'm glad they do.

    Bill Thompson

    And others do not.

    Robert Jordan

    Well, I'm sorry to hear that. Look, I write this for me. I've had people ask me time and again to "do this", or "do that", or "not do this". And I tell them: I'm sorry. I'm glad that you like to read these books. I'm glad that you have come this far on the journey with me. But I'm writing these books for me. And I know what's going to happen. And what's going to happen is what I want to happen, not what you guys want to happen, necessarily.

    Bill Thompson

    At the pace you think is best.

    Robert Jordan

    Yes.

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  • 11

    Interview: Feb 9th, 2003

    Bill Thompson

    The measure of the man is his equilibrium. Global renown may have fattened his purse, but not his head. He has not been shanghaied by adulation down the unworthy paths of ego. Three of the ten books of "The Wheel of Time" have scaled the summit of The New York Times best-seller list. Crossroads of Twilight, his latest, is the first to open at the crest. He is gratified. He is not, however, calling for an attendant.

    Robert Jordan

    "You want the reader to be drawn into the world you create, to be immersed in it," says Jordan, relaxing in his study. "But if I, as the writer, got that deeply into my world, it would produce very bad writing. You would lose the flow of what you are doing. I'm not suspending disbelief; I know I created this. What I'm after is getting other people to suspend the knowledge that they are reading a book and, for a little time, to feel that this thing is real."

    Bill Thompson

    Frame of mind is key.

    Robert Jordan

    "I focus on sitting down to each book as if this is 'It.' Nobody has ever heard of Robert Jordan. I've got this one book that I've got to try to make good enough that people will know who Robert Jordan is. I know that's a strange way to look at it, but it is very useful for trying to make the book good. It also helps me not worry about what's gone before."

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  • 12

    Interview: Feb 9th, 2003

    Bill Thompson

    In the wake of book nine, Winter's Heart (2000), Jordan confided that he might prefer that the 10th volume be the capstone of the story. But there will be two more books, at least.

    Robert Jordan

    "I tried, but I've had a problem with that from the beginning. I knew the last scene of the last book in 1984. When I started writing I knew where I was going. But some things had to be pushed forward. The story hasn't expanded; it's just taken me more time. In Crossroads of Twilight, things are reaching that stage where everything really is balanced on the point of a pin, or of a sword, if you prefer. There are a lot of things that could go in many directions. Good or evil can win in any number of different places and different levels."

    Bill Thompson

    If the book marks a departure from its predecessors, it rests with one particular device.

    Robert Jordan

    "One big departure is that each of the major segments of the book begins on exactly the same day, and it's a very significant day in terms of these books. The characters are reacting to the effects of that one significant day, as well as reacting to what is happening around them."

    Bill Thompson

    While Jordan hopes to bring matters to fruition in two more volumes, some of the more devoted fans would be only too happy if he took ten more books to complete the saga. When such ardent calls fall on the ears of the folks at Tor Books, Jordan is moved to cry, "Don't listen to them! Don't listen!"

    Robert Jordan

    "I have spent 18 years of my life on this, and I would like to finish it. I thought I was signing up for a 10K run. I knew it was not a stroll in the park. I knew I was doing something that was going to be longer than usual. But when I first started I thought that 'longer than usual' meant five or six books. I honestly thought I would finish it in five. But I discovered it wasn't a 10K run. It was a marathon, and I want to cross the finish line. Because these books are the way they are, I have to finish it for them to mean anything. After I complete the cycle I can take a breath. I can really go on a vacation."

    Footnote

    RJ is referencing here the header of Crossroads of Twilight: "And it shall come to pass, in the days when the Dark Hunt rides, when the right hand falters and the left hand strays, that mankind shall come to the Crossroads of Twilight and all that is, all that was, and all that will be shall balance on the point of a sword, while the winds of the Shadow grow.—From The Prophecies of the Dragon, translation believed done by Jain Charin, known as Jain Farstrider, shortly before his disappearance"

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  • 13

    Interview: Feb 26th, 2003

    Robert Jordan

    Most people by far seemed to like Crossroads, though one or two did complain that "nothing happened." I can see their point, in a way, but I think they were expecting another grand battle. I recall that a number of books ago I got some complaints from people because I hadn't killed off another of the Forsaken in a book and hadn't broken another of the seals on the Dark One's prison. There are always expectations that the books will go in a certain way, follow a certain path, and that isn't always the path I intend to follow. Myself, I think a great deal happened in Crossroads, even if it wasn't slam-bang stuff. In any case, I did plan for some of that, but those things will have to come in the next book because putting them into this one would have required at least another five or six months of writing and produced a thousand-page book.

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  • 14

    Interview: Mar 29th, 2004

    Sci Fi Weekly

    Is it harder to write a prequel or a sequel?

    Robert Jordan

    I think the prequel, because you don't want to give away things that come as a surprise in the main sequence books. You want to be a surprise as much as possible. That means you have constraints. I don't want to take away any of the "wow" factor from the main books for someone who has read New Spring first—that they can do, of course. You don't have to have read me before to read New Spring—which, I hasten to point out, is not the case of most of the books in the main sequence. With the main sequence books, you must start with The Eye of the World. If you picked up the latest book, Crossroads of Twilight—you'd read 10 pages, and if you hadn't read the books before, you'd quit from frustration. You wouldn't understand who these people are or what they are doing and why they are doing it.

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  • 15

    Interview: Jan 6th, 2004

    Baltimore, Maryland

    When I finished book 10, I was a little upset that Rand and his story line was barely mentioned or developed anymore. Not that book 10 wasn't incredible, but was the reason behind this to catch the other story lines up to the present time?

    Robert Jordan

    Not so much to catch them up, because that was the way it played out in my head. This was what needed to be done now.

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  • 16

    Interview: Apr 27th, 2004

    Wotmania Interview (Verbatim)

    Wotmania

    What did you find the most challenging aspect of writing Wheel Of Time? Was it the vast character backgrounds and world history, human interactions and relationships, or something else?

    Robert Jordan

    The greatest challenges in writing The Wheel of Time have been getting it all down on paper in a form that pleases me and doing so in a reasonable length of time while trying to make each book better than what I've done before. I'm seldom completely satisfied with what I've written, and I almost always think that one more rewrite would make it better, but there are things called deadlines, and a good thing, too, or I might never hand in a manuscript.

    I like trying new things with each book, too, especially tricks with time. Some of those work out better than others. The notion of starting each major segment of Crossroads of Twilight on the same day seemed a terrific idea, but by the time I realized that it would have been better to do it another way, I was too deeply into the book, with not enough time to rewrite the entire book.

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  • 17

    Interview: Apr 27th, 2004

    Wotmania Interview (Verbatim)

    Wotmania

    At the end of Crossroads of Twilight, did the Aes Sedai know immediately who Egwene was? Or did they find the Amyrlin's stole, and thus conclude that she was important?

    Robert Jordan

    They recognized her face. Remember, she did spend some time in the White Tower despite all of her jaunts outside.

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  • 18

    Interview: Jul 14th, 2005

    ComicCon Reports (Paraphrased)

    Question

    Crossroads of Twilight was kinda slow. Was that the calm before the storm?

    Robert Jordan

    Emphatic yes. "You'll be sweatin' before you finish Knife of Dreams."

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  • 19

    Interview: Oct 2nd, 2005

    Robert Jordan

    For N.O. Scott, no development in any of the characters has ever caught me by surprise, though once or twice I have realized that I could use someone in a fashion I hadn't expected to. There have been a few things that I intended to do but didn't. Sometimes, choosing to take a character in a certain direction precludes other things. The only thing that I wish I hadn't done was use the structure that I did for Crossroads of Twilight, with major sections beginning on the same day. Mind, I still think the book works as it is, but I believe it would have been better had I taken a more linear approach. When you try something different, sometimes it works, and sometimes it doesn't.

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  • 20

    Interview: Jul 14th, 2005

    Question

    One questioner noted that Crossroads of Twilight was far more concerned with politics than action, and asked if the rest of the series would follow those same lines.

    Robert Jordan

    RJ assured him that Knife of Dreams would be considerably different, and said, "You'll be sweating by the time you reach the end of it."

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  • 21

    Interview: Oct 4th, 2005

    Robert Jordan

    For Randshammer, you might say that mortals made the Horn of Valere. They certainly weren't gods.

    No, the story is NOT a dream. Jeez Marie!

    A very strong male channeler bonded to a very weak Aes Sedai could not use the bond to control her. Whoever holds the bond is in charge, though she might have a hard time controlling him.

    Everybody fears death because the being that is reborn, while possessing the same soul, will not be the same person. The fear is simple. I will cease to exist. Someone else will exist, bearing my soul. But I will cease. I have met many believers in reincarnation, and most of them seem to fear death just as much as anyone else.

    Yes, Elayne, Nynaeve and Egwene could pass the test for Aes Sedai with their current abilities, though Nynaeve might be a little hard pressed. Too much specialization.

    And finally, as I have said, I would not change anything in the books except the way that I structured Crossroads of Twilight.

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  • 22

    Interview: Jan 20th, 2003

    Rick Kleffel

    Now, what kind of story were you hoping to tell at the outset of the writing of this series, and what kind of story has it become as you've discovered it?

    Robert Jordan

    It's become exactly the sort of story I thought it was going to be at the start. I knew the story I wanted to tell, and I am telling the story I wanted to tell. That hasn't changed; it's headed for exactly the same conclusion that I planned in 1984. What has changed, you might say, is my understanding of how many pages it was going to take to tell this story. When I started The Eye of the World, I thought that I could put x amount of the story into that book, only to discover that I could put maybe two thirds of x into that book, and with each book I have written, I have found that. I sit down, and I plan what I want to put into this particular book, and I think I can put x amount of the story, and discover that I can only put half that, or two thirds of it, or three quarters in some cases. With Crossroads of Twilight, that is a 700-page hardback—almost 700 pages—and I realized after a while that if I put everything into it that I wanted, it was going to be a 1200-page hardback, maybe 1300 pages, and it would be another year before it was available, before I was finished with it. So, since I had already had to tell my publisher he had to move it once, I didn't think I could tell him that again.

    Rick Kleffel

    Well, I don't think your readers want to wait that long either. They're slavering to get this story.

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  • 23

    Interview: Sep, 2005

    Glas Durboraw

    What sort of influences do you find—not just in fiction and things like that—but, as you do your research, what sort of things influence what you write?

    Robert Jordan

    All sorts of things. Quite fascinating, I read a book called Salt, which was an actual history of salt. Fascinating book; a subject that I would not have thought would have been fascinating, but it was interesting enough that I picked up the book and read it in a night and a half, and a salt town appeared in one of the books. It was interesting enough that I said, "I'm going to have this salt town, and this next town you come to is going to be that."

    Glas Durboraw

    Isn't that in book ten?

    Robert Jordan

    Yes. Crossroads of Twilight includes a visit to a town where salt is produced. And other things pop in. I needed a way for some characters to get from one place to another sort of stealthily; I wanted them to be able to move without being noticed much. And I just happened to go to a thing called the Circus Flora, which was a recreation of a 19th Century American traveling circus, a small one-ring circus. And I was fascinated by it, and as a result of going to that show, Valan Luca's traveling show appeared, the original version, which was in effect a small-time circus. It became something much larger later as he earned money and built it up, but in the start, it was a small-time circus with a few acts and a few animals, and it was a way for these characters to be able to move from one place to another because nobody noticed them; they were looking at the show.

    Glas Durboraw

    I do like it when influences like that make their way in. And can you point to it and say, "Oh, maybe it's squeezed out of history," or something like that, or you see something similar in a favorite author, and it's like, "Oh, that's very cool to see that sort of thing brought in."

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  • 24

    Interview: Mar 25th, 2008

    Brandon Sanderson

    All right, I have to establish something before I get into my discussion of this book. First off, I've never been one who complained about the length of these books or the lack of motion in them. Like many fans who feel as I do, I would go along with others in conversations, giving a non-committal grunt when they lapsed into bashing the Wheel of Time for having grown too slow. But inside, I always thought "I think they're still as fun to read as they always were. Beyond that, why are you reading them if you always complain about them?" Anyway, it often wouldn't be worth arguing to me. (I still would sometimes on forums, however, and soon learned that that wouldn't get me anywhere.)

    Now I'm the person who has become the visible face for the Wheel of Time series, and now it IS my job—in my opinion—to defend them. So, I want to talk about Book Ten and say straight out that I really do think it's as enjoyable as the rest of the books in the series. (By my own admission above, however, I am biased. I'm both a long-time fan of the series and the person working on book twelve.)

    I know that readers feel that this book was too slow. The novel has one and a half stars on Amazon (and one star is the lowest possible.) I realize this, logically, but I have trouble seeing it myself. Perhaps people's complaints with this book has to do with the sense of narrative style. Mr. Jordan chose to jump back in time and show the timeframe in Book Nine over and over again from different viewpoints. However, this has always been one of the features of the series, and I—as a writer—was very interested in the format of this book. Rand's cleansing of the taint formed a wonderful focus around which everything in this book could revolve, much in the way that he as a person pulls at threads in the Pattern and forces them to weave around him.

    I particularly enjoyed Mat's sections in this book. I find myself growing more and more interested in his plot, and am picking him as my favorite character of late. I really enjoy his interactions with Tuon, and they have an interesting relationship, as both know that they're fated to marry. (Or, at least, he knows and she's very suspicious.) As a side note, however, I feel that the covers for this one and book nine are reversed. Book Nine was more important to Mat, and this book is more important to Perrin. Yet the covers imply the opposite. I digress.

    In truth, I have a lot of trouble understanding what people found boring about this book, yet at the same time exciting about Book Ten. The two—like all of the recent books in the series—very much seem to be chapters in a much longer book, all blending together and flowing as one. Perhaps it comes from us not being able to actually SEE characters react to the cleansing, as they don't know what happened yet—they only know that something big happened. But, then, that's an issue in book ten—and the complaints in reviews rarely, if ever, mention this item. In the end, I guess it has to come down to people's dislike of the Perrin/Faile plot. (But, once again, Perrin has always been one of my favorites, if not my favorite, characters in the book. So, his sequences are always fun for me.)

    This plot is interesting because it offers Perrin a chance to change in a different direction—and, I think, in an important direction. His wife's imprisonment forces him to face some of the darkness in himself, and it is what finally spurs him to give up the axe. Those are important events—he needs to be forced to admit that he has begun to like fighting and killing. Confronting that aspect of himself is what will give him the strength to lead into Book Twelve.

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  • 25

    Interview: Oct 27th, 2009

    Brandon Sanderson

    He also said that the series' ending puts certain threads in perspective. For example, Morgase, my least favorite character, apparently turns out to be less annoying than she appears. Also, fans will better be able to understand the importance of some of the lesser-liked books, like Crossroads of Twilight.

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  • 26

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2011

    Reddit AMA 2011 (Verbatim)

    nomoreink ()

    Are you able to read all the way through Crossroads of Twilight without pulling out your hair?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Ha. You know, I don't mind the book as much as most people do. As a writer, I'm interested in it for reasons that most wouldn't be. (The parallel nature of it, what about it drove people crazy, that kind of thing.)

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  • 27

    Interview: Jun 13th, 2002

    Robert Jordan

    As always, editing is an ongoing process, with me handing chapters to Harriet and redoing them to meet her editorial questions, not to mention redoing them to meet my own concerns or questions that have arisen in later chapters. I now believe that I will be finished and ready to hand in the manuscript to Tor by the end of August. This is much later than I had hoped, and much later than is usual with a book, but then, the last four books have been in the stores only two months after I handed in the completed manuscript. I would love to have a little more time to look at the thing as a whole, and so would Harriet, but the writing always takes longer than I first believe, the fans are always clamoring for the next book as soon as possible, and my publisher always wants to get the next book out as soon as possible and with as little gap as possible between it and the previous book. Given the foregoing, and that it takes me about two years to complete a book to my satisfaction—I'm never really satisfied, but at some point you have to say it's time to stop and go on to the next book—there doesn't seem to be any way to avoid that very quick turnaround. So you can tell people that, God willing and the creek don't rise, I will be ready to hand in the manuscript at the end of August and the book will be published in November. But even I don't know exactly how many pages it will be, at this point. Not short, though. I'm afraid I just don't write short.

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  • 28

    Interview: Dec 5th, 2000

    Br00se

    The signing was finished by the point with only a few people wandering in late to get some signed. He signed some store stock copies, and chatted a little bit more.

    Robert Jordan

    He told a few more stories from other signings. He explained that there was overlapping periods from the last two books and would be for the next one as well. When he said something about the next two signing dates in Columbia, SC and in Charleston, SC, I told him that the Tor website didn't have them listed. He seemed a little concerned about that. He told the story about getting his hat in Montana. And about how the current one was a replacement for one that walked away from for a signing.

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  • 29

    Interview: Nov 2nd, 2010

    Aidan Moher

    One of the perks associated with finishing The Wheel of Time is that you've read all of Robert Jordan's notes. Now that you know all the secrets (including stuff that won't even appear in the novels), how has your appreciation for the series changed?

    Brandon Sanderson

    It's been an interesting experience. So far as I know, I'm the only person in the world to have ever read through—beginning to end—the Wheel of Time, starting with Book One and continuing through until I reached the final scenes Robert Jordan wrote before he passed away. (Maria might have done it, but I don't think so—she pretty much has the books memorized by now, and seems to spot-read more than she reads straight through.)

    This is an experience others will start having in the coming years, and perhaps they'll agree with me that it DOES change the series. First off, you gain a better appreciation for Robert Jordan's ability to foreshadow. Second, the slow parts don't seem so slow any longer, particularly as you see books seven through fourteen as being one large novel.

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  • 30

    Interview: May 15th, 2003

    Dario Olivero

    What did you think when, after the tenth book, you turned back and saw all those pages?

    Robert Jordan

    Really I cannot look back. I write, publish and always look forward.

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  • 31

    Interview: May 15th, 2003

    Dario Olivero

    In the book just published in Italy [Crossroads of Twilight], the protagonist, a young man named Rand al'Thor, predestined to do something great, is scared and tries to flee, to escape his fate. Is it possible to escape fate?

    Robert Jordan

    All have many opportunities to change their lives. In this sense there is no fixed and immutable destiny. Fate materializes in the moment in which you make a decision: it is in that moment that your life takes a necessary direction.

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  • 32

    Interview: Apr, 2012

    Luckers

    What happened to Merilille and Talaan?

    Brandon Sanderson

    RAFO.

    LUCKERS

    I have this theory that they were killed by Careane to try and get the Windfinders to leave the palace.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    *poker face*

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  • 33

    Interview: Apr 21st, 2012

    Melissa Craib

    Melissa Craib, this year's JordanCon master of ceremonies, asked the Team Jordan members which parts of the story they had been surprised about.

    Harriet McDougal Rigney

    Harriet told about an incident she has described before from when she was writing the blurb for the dust jacket of The Dragon Reborn and finally realized that RJ intended Callandor to be an analog of the sword in the stone. She yelled down to RJ, "You son of a ****, you've done it to me again!"

    Maria Simons

    Maria said that she was surprised... well, actually I've forgotten what Maria was surprised about. Maybe somebody else remembers...was it from Knife of Dreams when Semirhage blows Rand's hand off? That's what comes to mind, but I don't remember any details about why that surprised her, really, so maybe that's not it. :s

    Alan Romanczuk

    Alan at first said that he wasn't surprised by anything; he had figured it all out, of course. Then he owned up to being a little surprised about the scene in Crossroads of Twilight in which Perrin chops off the hand of one of the captured Shaido, because it showed the depths to which a person could go when pushed to the brink.

    Peter Ahlstrom

    Peter said he was surprised when it was revealed that Demandred was... (yeah, he was messing with us).

    Footnote

    Nalesean at Theoryland pointed out that Maria said that she was surprised by the death of Rolan during the battle of Malden.

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  • 34

    Interview: Mar 15th, 2003

    M. L. Van Valkenburgh

    Named Crossroads of Twilight, the new book shot straight up the charts to number one the instant it was released Jan. 7 and has stayed on the bestseller lists ever since. And no surprise. Jordan's fans are rabidly loyal. They have stuck with him through what is so far a 7,000 page epic and it's not over yet. The book was supposed to be released in November, but fans waited patiently when Jordan chose to push the date back to January.

    Robert Jordan

    "Of course there's some pressure," he says. "But I just couldn't finish it in time and it was a question of whether I was going to have it done right, or have it done quickly."

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  • 35

    Interview: Apr 20th, 2013

    Terez

    Rosara Medrano appears in the Sun Palace at the beginning of Crossroads and seems to be an Aes Sedai. Was she part of the White Tower Embassy or did she arrive with Cadsuane?

    Maria Simons

    I'm almost positive she was with Cadsuane, with Cadsuane's faction. I think I asked Jim that when we were actually working on the book.

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