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Your search for the tag 'epigraphs' yielded 11 results

  • 1

    Interview: Jul 29th, 2006

    Brandon Sanderson (Prologue Part 1)

    Somewhere in the italicized pre-chapter blurb of the prologue here is the clue one needs to figure out the over-arching mystery of the entire series. If you figure it out, good for you! If you don't, you'll have to wait until the last chapter of the final book to get it explained. . . .

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  • 2

    Interview: Jul 29th, 2006

    Brandon Sanderson (Chapter 1-1)

    The 'bumps' or 'trailers' or whatever you want to call them—those things at the beginnings of the chapters—are a very interesting part of the book for me. If you're reading the novel for the first time as you go through these Annotations, I'd recommend paying good attention to what happens in the bumps. This isn't like DUNE, or even ENDER'S GAME, where the bumps give interesting—but tangential—information. These little paragraphs are vital if you want to figure out the climax of the story before it happens.

    Footnote

    Brandon has since decided to call them "epigraphs".

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  • 3

    Interview: Jul 29th, 2006

    Brandon Sanderson

    One thought—you might want to go through the book after each section ending and read ONLY the italicized epigrams at the beginnings of chapters. They tell a story in and of themselves. I will, for those of you who are epigram-challenged, dump some of the more important sections into the narrative later. However, there are some subtle things you'll miss if you don't read through all of the introductions.

    The concept of these epigrams—telling a story within a story——was another of the big things that made me want to write the book. There really is a third viewpoint happening in this book—a first person viewpoint that comes in each chapter, if only very briefly. Who is writing them? Where do they come from? You'll find out soon. (Like, in just a couple of chapters.)

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  • 4

    Interview: Jul 29th, 2006

    Brandon Sanderson (Chapter 16 Part 1)

    The epigrams in this section of the book should look familiar. Not because you've read them before, but because—assuming you have any familiarity with fantasy—you've read this kind of story before. The young peasant hero who rises up to fight the dark evil. I suspect that the jacket flap, if you've read it, gives away much of this storyline. This is one of the foundational concepts for the book, however. I've read too many stories about young peasant boys who save the world. I wanted to tell one about a world where the prophesied here came, then failed!

    This concept, of course, evolved. The original idea was for the Dark Lord to defeat the peasant boy. Instead, however, I found the concept of the peasant boy becoming the dark lord more interesting.

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  • 5

    Interview: Jul 29th, 2006

    Brandon Sanderson

    I sincerely hope that you've figured out that the logbook Sazed is translating is the source of the epigraph/bumps at the beginnings of the chapters. I found this a very interesting way to use the epigraphs—almost every one of my alpha readers spent a lot of time trying to guess who wrote them, and where they came from. That kind of anticipation makes for strong storytelling, and so I'm very pleased with the way the bumps start to come together and make more sense once the book gets found.

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  • 6

    Interview: Jul 29th, 2006

    Brandon Sanderson

    Originally, I started this chapter by going right into the logbook excerpt. Then, I realized that I had logbook excerpts before and after the chapter heading—which made things confusing. So, I added in the quick sentence about what Kelsier was doing.

    This is our first chance to see the text of the logbook collected in a longer form. I don't repeat all of the chapter epigraphs in-text—just some of the more essential ones. Partially, this is to make certain everyone who's been skipping the epigraphs has some of that information, and partially it's so that those of you who HAVE been reading the epigraphs can see some greater context for their order and flow.

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  • 7

    Interview: Jul 29th, 2006

    Brandon Sanderson (Chapter 26)

    This may just be my favorite epigraph in the book.

    Footnote

    The epigraph in question is "I am growing so very tired."

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  • 8

    Interview: Jul 29th, 2006

    Brandon Sanderson (Chapter 29)

    This is probably my favorite section from the logbook. It really comes together here, weaving in elements from the various epigraphs, making a story out of what the reader has previously only seen in pieces.

    I hope this story-within-a-story is interesting to you. It really does have a purpose in the novel, as you'll eventually see. At the very least, I should hope that the concept intrigues you. The past story is, after all, the standard fantasy novel story—the young peasant hero who follows the prophesies to rise up and defeat the dark lord. Except, as you can guess, something went wrong.

    Though I try to avoid writing the standard fantasy story, it intrigues me. That's why I wanted to have these epigraphs make reference to the concept. They let me play with what has come before me, without actually forcing my readers to spend all their time reading 'my' interpretation of the same old story. (It seems that every fantasy author has their own spin on this story—yet none of them realize that as a reader, I don't really want to read a new spin on an old story. I want to read a new story.)

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  • 9

    Interview: Jul 29th, 2006

    Brandon Sanderson (Epilogue Part 1)

    This last epigraph is actually out of order. Most of them were chronological as Vin read from the logbook. This one, however, doesn't actually come after the one before it. I just put it here because it felt like it belonged at the end.

    I did, actually, write most of these epigraphs (or bumps—or whatever you want to call the things at the beginnings of chapters) in one lump, then cut them apart, as I think I've mentioned. I did the same thing for book two, actually, where there's a different kind of puzzle going on in the narratives.

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  • 10

    Interview: Mar 8th, 2014

    Ness

    Any hints on the chapter 84 code?

    Brandon Sanderson

    There is a key in the book.

    Footnote

    http://www.17thshard.com/forum/topic/6762-chapter-84-decoded-epigraph-message/ - this was a puzzle that was decoded. The chapter 84 epigraph: 1118251011127124915121010111410215117112101112171344831110715142541434109161491493412122541010125127101519101112341255115251215755111234101112915121061534 decoded as: Hold the secret that broke the Knights Radiant. You may need it to destroy the new Orders when they return.

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  • 11

    Interview: Mar 20th, 2014

    Outis

    With the different headings on each chapter on the Stormlight Archive books, 5 years from now if I read the 5 books and I'm reading all of the last words of the people, is it going to be this huge foreshadowing?

    Brandon Sanderson

    It will make a lot more sense.

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