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Your search for the tag 'fallon' yielded 32 results

  • 1

    Interview: Oct 21st, 1994

    AOL Chat 1 (Verbatim)

    Jdieu

    I was just wondering two things: one, what books do YOU read, and what are some of the titles and types of your other written books? I'm really interested in reading more of your writing!

    Robert Jordan

    I read about four hundred or so books a year, half nonfiction, the fiction spread over almost every genre. I have written Westerns, historical fiction, international intrigue; I've ghostwritten some books; but everything except the fantasy is out of print at the moment.

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  • 2

    Interview: Oct 28th, 1994

    Harriet McDougal

    When we got to the head of the line, Harriet was taking the books, and opening them to get them ready. I handed her a copy of Reagan O'Neal's The Fallon Blood, and asked if he would mind signing it. She exclaimed over how long it had been since she'd seen that book.

    Robert Jordan

    He exclaimed over it too, and signed it 'Reagan O'Neal'. I asked him if Lord Valentine's Castle in any way inspired the menagerie scenes and he said, "No."

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  • 3

    Interview: Apr 5th, 1996

    Pam Korda

    Hawk found a way to get RJ's attention. Brandish a whip. You see, RJ IS a dirty old man.

    That was it for Saturday. On Sunday was the reading. He read a piece from A Crown of Swords. (I'll put it in a separate post, to avoid spoiling anybody even a bit. It wasn't a very plot-intensive bit, though. Fewer spoilers than the Prologue has!) It was a Mat bit. After the reading, he talked about Mat as a character a bit.

    Robert Jordan

    Anyway, Mat has indeed had far and away more MPS experience than our other young heroes, and intends to get much much more. I believe the quote was something like "The world is full of beautiful women, and Mat wants to romp barefoot though them all. (or was that with them all. same thing.) He's slept with lots of women; he's slept with women old enough to be his mother..."

    Also, Mat makes the Aes Sedai nervous.

    Sigh, and if RJ had shown all of this "on-screen," y'all wouldn't be complaining about the lack of explicit sex in TWOT!!! (And the books would read like The Fallon Blood.)

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  • 4

    Interview: Apr 5th, 1996

    Robert Jordan

    The Fallon Blood: It was originally longer, but it was cut in editing. Apparently, they cut out all the plot, and left in the raunchy bits.

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  • 5

    Interview: Jun 26th, 1996

    Compuserve Chat (Verbatim)

    Hopper

    Speaking of book signings, is there a tour in the works? If so, when?

    Robert Jordan

    Not for A Crown of Swords per se. There is a tour in the fall, I don't know exactly when, for the reprinting of some of my historical novels. It looks as though that will be expanded to include some areas where I normally wouldn't appear for those, to make it a partial tour for A Crown of Swords. The Tor Books website will give details (and so will Book Preview).

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  • 6

    Interview: Jun 27th, 1996

    AOL Chat 1 (Verbatim)

    Shosh001

    Mr. Jordan, can you tell us why Tor is sending you on tour for the Fallon series later this year, but not for A Crown of Swords?

    Robert Jordan

    Well, it was a very short time between handing in A Crown of Swords and its publication, and in fact, they weren't really sure when I'd finish so they couldn't make arrangements in advance. There's a possibility that the Fallon tour may be extended to encompass some of what we call A Crown of Swords territory.

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  • 7

    Interview: Oct 18th, 1996

    AOL Chat (Verbatim)

    Question

    I heard that some of your stuff is being republished. Fallon books, right?

    Robert Jordan

    That's correct. They are historical novels and I think they will appeal both to buffs of history novels, "The American Revolution," "The War Against the Tripoli Pirates," and also readers of what I have heard called "sober romances". The people are certainly full-blooded, shall we say, and there are a number of romances in there.

    Question

    About those historical novels, where do you get the information for those? Personal research?

    Robert Jordan

    Yes, and a personal interest in history.

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  • 8

    Interview: Nov 11th, 1997

    John from California

    Why did you choose to use a pseudonym for your Reagan O'Neal novels? I love them every bit as much as the Wheel of Time series.

    Robert Jordan

    I wanted to put different names on different kinds of books so there would be no confusion. I didn't want anyone to pick up a book because they had liked my last book only to find that they had bought something they didn't want to read.

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  • 9

    Interview: Nov 11th, 1997

    Matt from New York

    I love your Reagan O'Neal historical novels, the Fallon series. Did you have to do a lot of research for those?

    Robert Jordan

    A good bit. But on the other hand history is a hobby of mine, in particular the American Revolution in the South and the Southern move west, which went through Texas, Arizona, New Mexico, and California.

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  • 10

    Interview: Jan, 2001

    SFBC

    Is it true that you also write under other pen names? Dance reviews by Chang Lung, for instance.

    Robert Jordan

    I haven't used any of those for a long time, but I used to... and that was partly a hobby...And I've written westerns. Under the name Jackson O'Reilly. And Reagan O'Neill for historical fiction.

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  • 11

    Interview: Apr 4th, 2001

    Question

    You're using many different nicknames and pseudonyms. You write under Reagan O'Neill—fiction, Jackson O'Reilly—Westerns, Chang Lung ... why all those different names?

    Robert Jordan

    So people will know what they're getting. If you see something by Jackson O'Reilly you know not to expect a fantasy, you know that that's a Western book. Although now my publisher is mixing that up. He's reissued some of my old books: 'Robert Jordan writing as'. And I made them agree that they could only do this if they put the original pen name on the cover in letters as large as they use for Robert Jordan.

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  • 12

    Interview: Jan 22nd, 2003

    USA Today Article (Verbatim)

    Robert Jordan

    The South Carolina native dropped out of Clemson University after one year. ("I didn't know how to study.") He served two tours in Vietnam. Afterward, he attended The Citadel, becoming a nuclear engineer. A fall from a sub at the Charleston Naval Shipyard left him hospitalized for a month. His knee was rebuilt, and he suffered a near-fatal blood clot.

    The avid reader decided it was time to try writing. "Life was too short," he says. He decided to quit his job after a bookstore manager pal told him that a famous bodice-ripper romance writer made $3 million on two books. Jordan decided to pump purple prose. But there was a problem. "I couldn't quiver," he says.

    He met Harriet, a Manhattan editor who had moved home to Charleston. She told him he could write but to bag the bodice-rippers, suggesting instead he write historical novels. He published several under the name Reagan O'Neal.

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  • 13

    Interview: Mar 29th, 2004

    Sci Fi Weekly

    What was your first fiction sale?

    Robert Jordan

    A historical novel called The Fallon Blood, which was set during the American Revolution in the South. The state of South Carolina had approximately one quarter of all the battles, skirmishes and engagements fought in the American Revolution. It's been said of the colonies as a whole, a quarter of the people supported the revolution, a quarter of the people opposed it and the rest wished it would go away. That wasn't the case in the Carolinas and Georgia, where there was quite a bloody civil war fought between partisans for the two sides.

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  • 14

    Interview: Sep, 2005

    Glas Durboraw

    What other books have you written besides the Wheel of Time series? That's the one I'm most familiar with.

    Robert Jordan

    Well, many years ago, for my sins, I wrote seven Conan novels, ah, novels of Conan the Barbarian. I had been asked to do those because 1) my publisher got the chance to do the Conan novels, 2) the first Conan movie was coming out soon, and he wanted the novel fast, 3) he knew that I had once written a 98,000-word novel in thirteen days—well, it was remarkable, but I already had it all laid out in my head and all the research when I started that one—and I said yes to the one, and had so much fun doing that one that in a weak moment I said yes to six more. You know, they kept the wolf from the door for a few years, and that was good, and I also learned some lessons about writing within constraints. When you're trying to find something original to do or say in a world that has been created by somebody else, using a character who has been created by somebody else, it's difficult, and you have to stretch some muscles to be able to do that. I think I actually grew as a writer doing that, by that exercise. I have written...Conan was originally created by Robert Howard in the 1930s. Howard was, as a short story writer, one of the richest men in his West Texas town. When his father died, he promised his father he would take care of his mother. When his mother died, he committed suicide. Now, the reason he committed suicide, frankly, I think was the fact that it was West Texas in the Depression, and I can hardly imagine a bleaker place, and Howard himself firmly believed in reincarnation, and I think he just decided he was going to see what came next.

    As for other books I've written, let's see...I ghost-wrote a novel, an international thriller that shall remain nameless. Well, not a bad book, but it is generally believed that somebody else wrote it, so we'll let it go at that. I wrote what I consider I guess a Western, although it was set in the 1830s and 40s; there was only one major character who was not a Cheyenne Indian. It has been reissued—five or six years ago, I think it was—in hardcover as a novel of the Western experience, and it was received quite nicely. And I wrote three historical novels, the first set during the American Revolution, following the same family. I had intended to do a Southern arc of history. The general arc of history that is studied in the United States and recognized is the move out of New England—Pennsylvania and New York—into the Ohio valley, and from there west to California, but there was a southern arc, which was the move out of Virginia and the Carolinas into Louisiana and Mississippi, and from there into Texas, and from there through New Mexico and Arizona into California. And I wanted to follow that in a series of novels that I originally intended to go from the American Revolution through the Vietnam War, but I'll tell you the truth...I got tired of them. They were doing nicely, but I just got tired of them and said, "I want to do something else."

    Glas Durboraw

    I can sympathize. Some day I hope somebody does something very similar that also tracks the settlers as they came through Knox Landing, along with the Scottish/Irish settlers up there in northern Alabama, because you had of course Mobile, three hundred years old in the south, in southern Alabama [?].

    Robert Jordan

    I had gotten as far as the late 1820s or early 1830s and the family I was tracing, I'd reached as far as Texas, and you could see revolution on the horizon, but it had not arrived yet.

    Glas Durboraw

    [?] That sounds wonderful, and if you ever get inspired to write that again, that would be great.

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  • 15

    Interview: Oct 29th, 2005

    Jeremiah

    I got two questions about his writing process answered, one concerning when exactly he began WoT (if he knew he would write it while he was writing The Fallon Blood as Reagan O'Neal).

    Robert Jordan

    He said that there were a few things in his head, but nothing solid yet, nothing close to a coherent story. That didn't happen until a couple of years later.

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  • 16

    Interview: Jan 20th, 2006

    Robert Jordan

    For Heartclaw, I doubt I'll ever write any further books about the Fallon family, but who knows? Let's just call it very unlikely.

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  • 17

    Interview: Aug 9th, 2008

    Tom Doherty

    Moshe starts off the panel asking Tom to talk about how The Wheel of Time got started. Tom says that the story begins with Harriet. Tom was publisher of the Tempo imprint for Grosset & Dunlap back in the ’70s, and Harriet was his top editor. They did so well with Tempo that Grosset & Dunlap went out and bought SF publisher Ace for them to run. Their success continued at Ace, and Tom brought in an editor named Jim Baen to work under Harriet. Sales volume doubled.

    Soon after this, though, Harriet’s parents died and she inherited the family house in downtown Charleston—with a 500-square-foot walled garden, a gardener, a maid, and a cook who had been with the family for years. “Harriet is a Southern Princess,” Tom says. Harriet was divorced and wanted to go home to Charleston to raise her son. Tom didn’t want to lose her as an editor, so Popham Press was created. Harriet acquired and edited books down in Charleston, and production and marketing were done by Ace under a profit-sharing agreement. “It was telecommuting before the word was invented,” Tom says.

    Harriet met Jim Rigney in a local bookstore there in Charleston. Jim was an engineer in atomic submarines who had been injured, and while he was recuperating, he was writing. The bookstore owner knew Harriet was an editor, and he thought the two of them should meet, so he introduced them.

    Jim wrote a book called The Fallon Blood to romanticize a part of U.S. history he felt had been overlooked in popular culture—the Southern role in the Revolutionary War (Swamp Fox, etc.). He decided that he would publish his books under pseudonyms, and use a different one for each series. He used the name Reagan O’Neal for the Fallon books.

    Then Grosset & Dunlap started having problems and they brought in a “financial guy” to run the company. He decided that they should only publish bestsellers. This is part of the reason Tom left to found Tor Books. The opportunity came up for Tor to publish some Conan novels, one of which would be a novelization of the Conan the Destroyer movie. Jim Rigney was interested in doing the book and some other Conan novels, and the pseudonym he picked for them was Robert Jordan. He also took over editing some sword & sorcery books for Tor.

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  • 18

    Interview: Oct 21st, 1994

    AOL Chat 2 (Verbatim)

    Question

    Have you written any books previous to the Wheel of Time set?

    Robert Jordan

    Yes.

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  • 19

    Interview: Oct 21st, 1994

    AOL Chat 2 (Verbatim)

    Question

    What other books have you written under your other pen names?

    Robert Jordan

    A number, in other genres, and they're all out of print at the moment.

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  • 20

    Interview: Jun 30th, 2010

    Luckers

    Ok, I suppose I'll start on the job. How did you come to edit for Jim? Did it just fall into place due to your respective jobs, or was it something you had to discuss first?

    Harriet McDougal Rigney

    It fell into place as follows: When we met I was editing my own imprint, and I gave him his first publishing contract. It was for the Fallon historical novels: The Fallon Blood, The Fallon Pride, and The Fallon Legacy. We worked on The Fallon Blood all the way through publication before we ever went on a date—so the editor/writer relationship is the older one. We simply found that we worked very well together.

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  • 21

    Interview: 2001

    Rochelle O'Gorman

    I know you have used the pseudonyms Reagan O'Neal and Jackson O'Reilly in the past. Why?

    Robert Jordan

    To keep different genres separate. The other books were written before I began The Wheel of Time, and my publisher has re-issued them and insisted on doing them as "Robert Jordan writing as." But, I made them put the other pen name as large as possible on the cover so that they didn't do "ROBERT JORDAN writing as." As it was, I didn't want anybody to think that they were getting a new Robert Jordan novel, when what they were getting was a historical novel or a western that I wrote 15 or 20 years ago.

    Rochelle O'Gorman

    You're not doing those anymore, then?

    Robert Jordan

    No. I'm not saying I won't ever do them again.

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  • 22

    Interview: May 24th, 2004

    Chiara Codecŕ

    What was that book about?

    Robert Jordan

    It was called The Fallon Blood, and as I said it was set during the American Revolution in the state of South Carolina. It's been said of the colonies as a whole, a quarter of the people supported the revolution, a quarter of the people opposed it and the rest wished it would go away but in the Carolinas and Georgia there was quite a bloody civil war fought between partisans for the two sides.

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  • 23

    Interview: Dec 7th, 2000

    CNN Interview (Verbatim)

    Michele Dula Baum

    Before starting the saga of Randland, as it is known to fans, he wrote a historical series called "The Fallon Chronicles" and serialized several "Conan the Barbarian" novels. There are things Jordan wants to write afterwards, too.

    But "Wheel" comes first.

    Robert Jordan

    "I've been warned that if I died before I finished the books, they were going to desecrate my grave," he said with a laugh.

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  • 24

    Interview: Sep, 2000

    Tahir Velimeev

    I am very glad to meet you, dear Mr. Jordan! Welcome to St. Petersburg.

    Robert Jordan

    Thank you! I'm also glad for the chance to visit your beautiful city. I’ve been to not a few places, but this is my first time in Russia. Many thanks to the organizers of the Wanderer Fantasy Convention who invited me to St. Petersburg. And my special thanks to them for the opportunity to visit Peterhof and admire its magnificent fountains. Fountains have fascinated me since childhood ...

    Tahir Velimeev

    What is the proper way to address you?—Mr. Robert Jordan? Or Mr. James Rigney ... Or in some other way?

    Robert Jordan

    Call me, as we do it in America, just James.

    Tahir Velimeev

    Or Robert? ...

    Robert Jordan

    Robert is fine too. I'm used to it. I’m often addressed exactly so in meetings with readers.

    Tahir Velimeev

    By the way, how many names does the multifaceted James Oliver Rigney, Jr. have?

    Robert Jordan

    Not very many, but also not a few. Under the pseudonym Reagan O'Neal the historical novels The Fallon Blood, The Fallon Legacy and The Fallon Pride were published. The events in them takes place during the American Revolution, around my hometown of Charleston. The name Jackson O'Reilly is on the cover of the western Cheyenne Raiders. My critical pieces on theater and dance I signed Chang Lung. And under the pseudonym Robert Jordan the novels of the Conan series and the The Wheel of Time series were published.

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  • 25

    Interview: Apr 21st, 2012

    Matt Hatch

    How much influence did you have over the prose—voice and tone—at the time of The Eye of the World?

    Harriet McDougal

    Some, but not major. The first book of his that was published was The Fallon Blood, and it was enormous, and for some reason, it had to be cut. It was going to be published at Ace, and I guess they were just blanching at production costs, and I said, "Well can't we get rid of some of these battles?" And he said, "Harriet, I wounded Michael Fallon, and sent him off to Georgia to recuperate to get rid of a hundred battles. I mean, we really can't; there's no way we can take out any of them." I went, "Oh." So, I said, "There's nothing for it, then; we'll have to take out three lines on every page." And that's what we did.

    Matt Hatch

    And did you work together on those lines?

    Harriet McDougal

    Yeah. And a friend asked me to go out to dinner with her and the guy she was dating, although her divorce wasn't final—she wanted me to be a "beard", if you've heard the expression—and I said, "If you help with the snopake!" So we're all on there doing this...but Jim said my nature as an editor...he said, "Harriet, if you were editing Charles Dickens, you would have said, 'Now Charles, you can have "bah", or you can have "humbug", but you can't have both!'" (laughter) And I think it's pretty true.

    Matt Hatch

    Did that relationship of editing go on through the entire Wheel of Time? In other words, were there all these times you would sit down in The Shadow Rising, and say, "Jim...okay, three lines; we gotta cut three lines out of these."

    Harriet McDougal

    He'd pretty much learned to do it himself by then, and certainly in The Eye, I would say, "Well, this can go," and he'd say, "Well Harriet, in the fourth book, um..." (laughter) I didn't really realize what I was up against. (whine) "But Harriet, in the third book...in the fifth book...these things have got to be there." (meek voice) "Okay, okay." And he'd learned...he was tightening up his prose by then, a lot. And actually, as the series went on, it got to be...I did almost no pencil-work, and I thought, "Well, man, he's learned everything I had to teach him. He probably needs a new editor now who could put him through new hoops!"

    Matt Hatch

    What is one major thing you taught Jim about prose, and something you think that helped him become a better writer?

    Harriet McDougal

    Tight. Write tight. Tighten up. And I think, even editing The Fallon Blood was very good for his prose. It was a vicious small-scale kind of cut, cut, cut. Don't use two adjectives where one will do, and if you can do without any adjectives at all, it's best. Nouns and verbs are where the strength in the writing is.

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  • 26

    Interview: Dec 7th, 2012

    Narrator

    Before the tale of Rand al'Thor, the epic story of the Wheel of Time humbly begins with a man named Jim, known to the world as Robert Jordan, author of the best-selling Wheel of Time series. James Oliver Rigney, Jr. was born October 17, 1948 in Charleston, South Carolina.

    Harriet McDougal

    Growing up, he'd often told about lining up I think Jules Verne, Mark Twain and Jack London, and thinking, "I want to write books."

    Jason Denzel

    He joined the Army in 1968 and served two tours in Vietnam as a helicopter gunner.

    Harriet McDougal

    He returned to begin college at The Citadel as a veteran student and took a job as a civilian nuclear engineer working for the United States Navy.

    Jason Denzel

    And it was during this time that he took a hard look at his life and decided to become a full-time writer.

    Harriet McDougal

    He was in the hospital with a blood clot when he did the famous—the thing so many people talk about doing—he threw a book across the room and said, "I can do better than that." He wrote something called Warriors of the Altaii. I read it, and...no, it wasn't what I was interested in. But it showed he could do it. So I gave him a contract for a book that became The Fallon Blood. We'd been seeing a lot of each other. He brought a tiger claw from Vietnam to show my son. Will came running upstairs to my office one day and said, "Mom, he'll take me to see the Star Trek movie." And I said, "Can I come too?" And he said yes. And I guess that was our first date.

    Tom Doherty

    She edited Jim, and they fell in love, and they got married, and we all became friends.

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  • 27

    Interview: Jan 10th, 2013

    Question

    I was wondering, Harriet: how many books did you edit for Jim before you found him to be romantic?

    Harriet McDougal

    One book, but it was a big mother of a book. [laughter] It was a book called The Fallon Blood, which was his first published novel, an historical novel of Charleston during the American Revolution. [inaudible] So we cut it, and it was taking up three lines a page. I said, can't we kill some of these battles? And he said, "Harriet, I've already avoided..."—I've forgotten what it was—"...fifty of the Revolutionary battles by sending the hero off wounded to Georgia to recover. I really can't cut any more." Okay, so we did all that, worked together, and then at publication time, the book was being distributed by Ace Books, where I'd been editorial director, and the director of publicity quit in the month of publication. So I drove him down to Savannah where he had one of the famous booksignings that beginning authors run into—you go to the bookstore, and they have one of your book. [laughter] [inaudible]

    And so, we had done a number of things like that, and he had befriended my son, who was then eleven. And one afternoon, he'd come in [inaudible] And Will came running up to me where I was working at my desk, and he said, "Mom, he says he wants to take me to see the Star Trek movie. Can I go?" He said, "Huh, huh? Can I go?" And I said, "Well, let me come downstairs with you," and I said, "Can I come too?" [laughter]

    Footnote

    Harriet also tells these stories here (for the bit about editing The Fallon Blood) and here (for the bit about her son); we had better audio for that interview, so the information is more complete.

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  • 28

    Interview: Feb 11th, 2013

    Question

    This is a question for Harriet. What was it like editing for your husband, and having to tell him, "No..."

    Harriet McDougal

    Well, I gave him a contract for what proved to be his first published book. It was a historical novel called The Fallon Blood, and Tor Books has reissued it, and it says in huge letters on the front: "Robert Jordan writing as Reagan O'Neill," and of course it was James Oliver Rigney writing as Robert Jordan writing as... (laughter) It was very good, but he kept delivering it, and the manuscript was getting like this (gesture). It covered the American Revolution in South Carolina. He wanted to do what John Jakes had done for the northern sweep of American history, so it was getting bigger and bigger, and I said, "Well, Jim, couldn't we cut some battles?" And he said, "Harriet, that's why I sent Michael Fallon wounded to Georgia to recuperate. I've already skipped twenty-five battles. We can't cut any more." (laughter)

    And I said, "Well, then the only thing is we'll have to cut three lines a page," because my distribution agreement—it was my own imprint; this was before Tor came into being—was kind of fierce. So we....well, I'll tell you, I had a friend who needed a beard. She was seeing a gentleman who wasn't quite as divorced as he should have been..." (laughter) "...and you all know what a beard is? I would be the third person at their lunch table, so that no one would say, "Oh, she's having a thing with this guy." And I said, "I'll do it, as long as you come help with the snopake." So we sat around my dinner table, and this was so long ago, great swooping pencil-lines and snopake over the worst. It would be...[?]...It was a mess!"

    But we did all of that before we ever went out on a date; we went all the way through publication. And that means the professional relationship was older than the romantic relationship, and it sort of...it worked! Somebody said to me later, "Yeah, well what would you do if he gave you a piece of [expletive]." And I said, "Well you know, he never would!" If he was writing a midlist book, it wouldn't be [expletive], it would be good midlist, and it wasn't about games; it was about the book, always. So that's how we did it, and it worked. (applause)

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  • 29

    Interview: Mar 18th, 2013

    Tom Doherty

    The first Robert Jordan novel Harriet published personally, we did as a joint venture under the imprint and the company Popham Press. Popham is her maiden name.

    Harriet McDougal

    Well, it was distributed by Ace.

    Tom Doherty

    It was distributed by it, yes. I was Publisher of Ace at the time.

    Irene Gallo

    What was the title of that book?

    Harriet McDougal

    His first published book is called The Fallon Blood. It's a novel that covers the American Revolution in the South. At the time, I thought: "If I have to look at one more book about the Civil War, I'll just throw up. I've had it with crinoline. There are too many. Margaret Mitchell did it once and for all. Let's go for the Revolution instead." So he did—the revolution in Charleston, South Carolina, in particular.

    He followed that with The Fallon Pride, which covered the War of 1812, and The Fallon Legacy, which took the Fallons into the brand new Republic of Texas. At that point distribution dried up, otherwise he could have just gone on. He had a dream in which a man is holding Michael Fallon's sword, standing next to the grave of the Fallon who has died in the Vietnam conflict, and I thought, oh, boy. Anyway, with those books he wanted to write the Southern sweep of American history, in the way that John Jakes wrote the Northern sweep. Taking people across the continent. And they were good.

    Tom Doherty

    They were.

    Harriet McDougal

    I would like to the point out something to the fans. Every single book Robert Jordan wrote begins with the wind. "The English wind blew the dust into Michael Fallon's face on his Irish road." That was the beginning of The Fallon Blood. The Fallon Pride begins, "The August winds scorched across Tripoli harbor." There is always a wind. I think it was very conscious that he was breathing life into his characters. Breath and wind have the same root, I think, at least in Hebrew.

    Irene Gallo

    That's wonderful.

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  • 30

    Interview: Mar 18th, 2013

    Tom Doherty

    I think he'd only actually written two Conans when he decided to write The Wheel of Time. We talked about it a lot in '83. I remember talking about it quite a bit before we did the contract in '84. I thought The Fallon Blood was going to be a standalone and that there was only going to be the one book on the Southern sweep of history. It ended up being three. We began talking about an epic fantasy: one book, then maybe three books like The Lord of the Rings. I just didn't believe it would get done in three books, because by then I knew how Jim liked to tell a story. So we did the contract in early '84. He was doing Conan books well beyond when we began talking about that in '83. When did the first Conan book ship? '81?

    Harriet McDougal

    Oh, I don't remember. Maybe the movie you were hoping to plan your timing around was the second Conan movie?

    Tom Doherty

    I think it was. I think it was later because we were already pretty far along in the planning of The Wheel of Time, and this was related. It just seemed natural for him to be doing that, too.

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  • 31

    Interview: Aug 21st, 2013

    Brandon Sanderson

    So after Ender's Game, the second Tor book that I can remember reading was The Eye of the World and the other Wheel of Time books. There were all these rumors out there about how many books it was planned to be and what it was originally pitched as. Tom, I think we need to hear it from your mouth: the first-hand witness of that pitch when James Rigney came in. Was it this office right here?

    Tom Doherty

    Well, actually we'd already done three books with him. The Fallon Blood, The Fallon Pride, and The Fallon Legacy. He did them under a different pen name.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Right. Reagan O'Neal.

    Tom Doherty

    They had started out to be one book. He was going to do a big historical novel of the American Revolution, but it ended up being three fat books.

    When he came in and said he wanted to do a big epic fantasy novel, we said, "Well, a big epic fantasy?" He said, "Well, maybe it'll be a trilogy." So I suggested a six book contract, and when he said no I said "Okay, you know if you finish it in three, we'll just do a different trilogy." He said, "Well, all right, if you insist."

    Brandon Sanderson

    Didn't you tell me that, when he gave the pitch on the first book, it really ended where the third book now ends, with the sword that's not a sword being taken from the stone that's not a stone?

    Tom Doherty

    Well, he didn't actually, no. He didn't give me a very detailed outline, but I didn't really need one because he'd done such a great job with the Fallon trilogy and Harriet [McDougal, Robert Jordan's widow and editor] was sold on it. Harriet had edited the Fallon trilogy.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Right. She tells the story that she called you after reading the few chapters of The Eye of the World that she'd read and said, "You need to look into this thing, because either I've fallen into the wife trap after all these years, or this is the best thing I've ever read." [Note: Harriet McDougal told the same story during her conversation with Tom Doherty.]

    Tom Doherty

    I don't remember her saying that, but she did call me and say, "Hey, this is special." And I read it, and it was special. We did some things with those books that were pretty major for a small, independent company.

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