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Your search for the tag 'rj's routine' yielded 26 results

  • 1

    Interview: Oct 21st, 1994

    AOL Chat 1 (Verbatim)

    Phylwriter

    I was wondering more what your "writing life" was like...you know, like an every day kinda thing—could you tell us what a normal, RJ day is like?

    Robert Jordan

    Average day at beginning of book is: have breakfast, answer letters and telephone calls, then write for six to eight hours. Do this five days a week. After a while, this gets to be: drink a quart or two of strong coffee, write for twelve to fourteen hours a day, and do this seven days a week. Eventually the book is finished or I am dead.

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  • 2

    Interview: Jun 26th, 1996

    Compuserve Chat (Verbatim)

    Seancha’

    What are your days like and how do you discipline yourself to write? Is it something you only do when the mood strikes, or do you work at a page, despite it not really flowing, and then edit like hell later?

    Robert Jordan

    A writer who waits for the mood or the muse to strike will starve to death because he or she won't write very much. I write almost every day, I would say every day, but occasionally I actually do something else. My typical day is to have breakfast, answer the phone calls I have to answer, deal with the letters, and then I sit down and start writing. I then write for at least the next eight hours straight, and sometimes ten or twelve or more. Though I do occasionally take a day off to go fishing, my usual week is seven days.

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  • 3

    Interview: Oct 18th, 1996

    AOL Chat (Verbatim)

    Question

    Considering that schedule, do you spend every waking minute on your books or do you do other things in between that prepare you to write?

    Robert Jordan

    I do other things. I fish, although not nearly as often as I should, just for relaxation purposes, and of course I read. Actually, I have to read. If I don't read someone else before going to bed, I will lie there awake all night thinking about my own work and what I want to do next.

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  • 4

    Interview: Nov 1st, 1998

    SciFi.com Chat (Verbatim)

    Moderator

    I'm curious about your writing methods—do you write for a set number of hours every day? Morning or night? Do you prefer a computer or do you write long-hand on yellow legal pads? Inquiring minds want to know!

    Robert Jordan

    I most definitely write on a computer. I upgrade it about every 18 months. At the moment I'm using a Pentium 266 MMX with 32 MB ram and a 10G hard drive. I'll upgrade that in another six months. My writing day goes as follows: After breakfast I answer the phone calls and letters that I have to answer from yesterday. Then I start writing. I seldom stop for lunch and I stop about six or seven at night. That's seven days a week. Occasionally I take a day off to go fishing.

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  • 5

    Interview: Nov 11th, 1998

    Tijamilism

    Robert... When do you ever get a break? time for yourself? And how do you spend that time?

    Robert Jordan

    Generally, I work 10-12 hrs a day, 7 days a week...sometimes my wife will say to me, you're working too hard, go fishing, and sometimes I will. And sometimes she will say to me, I want you to see something on the porch, and when I go downstairs, there's a fishing guide waiting, and she tells me to go away and fish. That's about it except for the occasional stops to fish when I'm traveling, there's too much to write and not enough years. She's a wonderful person, the empress of the known universe!

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  • 6

    Interview: Nov 11th, 1998

    Talisein

    Speaking of your wife reminded me. Are you planning on updating the telephone message thing at TOR after you're done with your tour? And what's that piano I hear in the background on the recording that's there now?

    Robert Jordan

    I don't know what the piano music is except that I generally play classical music when I am working. I listen to Jazz, Rock, Country, various music—Deco, all sorts of things when I am relaxing—but I have to work to Classical and since I changed the CDs out I really couldn't tell you what particular piece it is. And as for updating the message, I will. I am told that the subject was broached while I was still working on the book—not to me—and the question was raised as to whether it was better for me to spend time updating the message or to go ahead and work. Since even a ten-minute break can mean an hour or more getting back into the flows and rhythms, apparently the decision reached was don't bother the man!

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  • 7

    Interview: Aug 30th, 1999

    Question

    Are you a very disciplined writer? You must work, for example, between nine and five. How does that fit in with the pressure to complete the series, for example, from publishers?

    Robert Jordan

    Well I've never looked at the page of something more common. That's simple fact. I get up in the morning, I have breakfast, I go back down the long garden to the carriage house where my study is. And Maria, my chief assistant is in and she will... Phone messages from yesterday mainly that I should maybe call back about. I'll look at my email and see what I want to answer and what I'm going to ignore. And then I start working, I start writing. And that's probably... that could be, depending on how late I slept. I could be at work from nine to eleven which is about the time I start writing. About four o'clock in the afternoon I realize that I haven't stopped for lunch and I'm a bit hungry but it's too late to stop for lunch now. Cause I'm figuring I'll knock off at six and go in to eat with Harriet. And sometimes I do and sometimes I forget the time again and I get a phone call saying, "Are you ever coming in?" I look up and realize it's dark outside and I quickly go into the house. I don't know whether you call it disciplined or obsessed but there are very few things I'd rather do than write. When I get into the story, I'm really into the story. The creation of it is at that moment the most important thing in the universe. I've had windstorms breaking branches and rain hurling things all over the place. The big window beside my desk to this side. Glass sided door, long garden over here, glass front door... And I didn't know there was a storm. I didn't know it was raining, I didn't know there was wind, I didn't know there was anything...

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  • 8

    Interview: Sep 20th, 1999

    Robert Jordan

    He listed his favourite seven authors (Joel Gilmore has all of them on his tape) but all I can remember at the moment are Twain and Dickens. RJ is a writeaholic when he gets going, and often skips lunch and writes all day. He enjoys writing in his garden, and this keeps him away from Harriet when he is in writing mode.

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  • 9

    Interview: Oct, 2000

    Orbit Interview (Verbatim)

    Orbit Books

    When you are writing, do you have a daily routine?

    Robert Jordan

    Yes. I read the newspapers over breakfast, lift weights or swim for half an hour, then go to my desk, in the carriage house in the garden, and answer the email, letters and telephone calls that simply must be answered. Then I begin writing. I usually spend at least eight hours a day writing, with a short break for lunch, and normally I do this seven days a week. Occasionally I will take a day to go fishing, but unless I am away from home, I usually find myself wondering why I am not back at my desk writing.

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  • 10

    Interview: Nov 11th, 2000

    Jiri Kristek from The Czech Rep.

    Mr. Jordan How many hours per day do you approximately spend writing, and do you listen to music meanwhile or do you prefer the silence?

    Robert Jordan

    I usually write to classical music of various kinds, and occasionally Chinese or Japanese music. I like to listen to rock and to jazz, but I can't write to them. As for the number of hours, I try to do at least eight hours a day, six or seven days a week. When the schedule gets very hectic, that can grow to twelve hours a day seven days a week, and no time off.

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  • 11

    Interview: Nov 6th, 1998

    Therese Littleton

    What's your writing day like?

    Robert Jordan

    Breakfast, answer the mail, answer phone calls, then sit down and start writing. I don't stop until lunch. About six or seven in the evening I quit and go in for dinner. If the book is really going hot, I might work later. It's eight or nine hours of writing, usually, and I do that seven days a week. If I decide to take a day and go fishing, since I know I don't do that very often, I don't mind doing that.

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  • 12

    Interview: Apr 7th, 2001

    Question

    Don't remember anything about the wording, but it should be clear from the answer...

    Robert Jordan

    There's a strict border between my writing and the rest of my life certainly, but the story involves itself in my head. And I continually think about it. I'm always thinking about how I'm going to structure things, how I want the flow of words to work, the rhythms and patterns of words. The difficulty is, I must...I have two rituals at night that are necessary. If I fail... The first is that I read...someone else. And I must read for several hours. And then having read for several hours, work myself from the books, I must make sure that there...for half an hour or so, I won't drift back with my thinking to my own books. So I drink a very, very large brandy...yes, 6 or 8 ounces. And just straight down. And this makes me sleepy enough that I will drift off, and that's the night.

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  • 13

    Interview: Jan 11th, 2003

    Robert Jordan

    As to his daily writing habits, a long while ago he used to write for 25 or 30 hours straight, until absolutely exhausted (regardless of the time of day). Then he would sleep for 7 or 8 hours and return to the 25 or 30 hour cycle. However, he remarked that this schedule is not suitable for making his wife happy, so he switched to his current schedule, which goes something like: wake up, read the newspaper over breakfast, and begin writing at his computer (which he later told a person in line that it was a custom built, with a 17" flat screen monitor). He then writes for 8 to 10 hours, sometimes but not usually stopping for lunch. Then in the evening he would quit, help his wife prepare dinner, and start the whole process over again—7 days a week. His change to this 8 to 10 hour day was in part motivated by his decision "that keeping his wife was far more important" than keeping the "optimum" writing schedule.

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  • 14

    Interview: Jan 6th, 2004

    Chicago, IL

    What is your writing schedule like on an average day? Meaning, when you sit down to write, do you have a set goal of how many pages you want to write that day? How much is your average?

    Robert Jordan

    I have no idea how many words I write in a day. My usual schedule, seven days a week, is after breakfast I come back to my desk, I deal with the e-mail that has to be dealt with, and then I start writing. I try to remember to try to stop for lunch. Usually I don't remember until about four in the afternoon, which is a little too late for lunch, I think. Then at 6 p.m., I help my wife fix dinner. I used to work a more rigorous schedule, but wives don't like a husband who might be waking at 2 in the morning or might be going to bed at 2 in the afternoon and have an absolute disconnect with the sun. I don't know why she didn't like that, but I stopped it.

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  • 15

    Interview: Mar 19th, 2010

    Luckers

    What did you do for Robert Jordan as a part of that job, and how much as that changed since his passing?

    Maria Simons

    My job has constantly evolved. First there was fanmail and filing. Then the audiobook project got underway, and someone had to go through and mark all of the changes in point of view so that Michael Kramer could read the male POVs and Kate Reading could read the female ones. Jim decided that I could do that, so, much to my delight, I was getting paid to read The Wheel of Time. I was in hog heaven, of course. At that time, Jim was finishing up A Crown of Swords, and when the proofs came in, Harriet suggested that I assist in going through them, but Jim said no, he didn't want to spoil me. I was crushed. Over the next year or so, though, my job broadened. He gave me the in-house glossary to tidy up, and some of his notes to consolidate. He also would give me lists of questions like "Has character A ever met Character B?" and "Give me three examples of character C's speech" and "Find me all of the information you can on what a baby feels as he's being born." By the time he had The Path of Daggers ready to give to Harriet for editing, I had convinced him that I could help with maintaining our house glossary going forward, and he decided that I would get the pages at the same time Harriet did. Harriet encouraged me to edit as well, and I would do that and pass the pages on to her. I don't know if any of my edits made it into the final book, but Harriet did begin recommending me for freelance editing.

    I did other things as well. Jim had a massive personal library, and mentioned that he would love for it to be cataloged; I cobbled together a classification system, using WordPerfect mail merge. I also cataloged his music collection, and kept the existing catalog of movies updated. I did shopping for him, arranged appointments, worked on the Wizards of the Coast RPG and the New Spring comics. When the new cat went missing, I made and put up posters in the neighborhood (we found her hiding under the house, eventually); when cranes and herons started stealing goldfish, I was given fox urine to spread around the pond to discourage them (Jim did encourage me to delegate; I managed to pass that one on to someone else. It smelled so bad that that idea was soon abandoned and we covered the fish pond with a net. I still sometimes find huge birds staring hungrily at the fish when I walk out there). Eventually I took over the bookkeeping as well. He took to calling me his right arm. Over time, I picked up assistants, two of whom are still with me: Marcia Warnock, who took over the book catalog, spread the fox urine, keeps me in office supplies, handles all the annoying phone calls, and keeps me on schedule; and Alan Romanczuk, who took over the questions and research, became our IT specialist, and assists with the bookkeeping, among many other things.

    Then, after the Knife of Dreams tour, Jim was diagnosed with amyloidosis. Our focus changed somewhat; we all worked to help him and Harriet as much as we could. After the night that Jim told the ending to Wilson and Harriet, I would sit and talk with him about the end of the series, with a tape recorder running. The last thing that we did together was select the winners of the calendar art contest. Note: I didn't select, I just gave him the art and took notes, and then emailed the winning names to Tor. That was two days before his death.

    The significant thing that has changed about my job since then is that Jim isn't here. It's quieter—there is no big, booming voice calling "Maria!" or singing as he comes in the office. There's no one explaining military stuff to me and making it really clear and interesting. There's no one sitting at his desk wearing a silly hat. What I do at my job hasn't changed that much. Now I work directly for Harriet, who is as wonderful a boss as Jim was. When Brandon has questions about the books, I work on finding answers, as does Alan. When Brandon sends us a book, I go through it looking for continuity errors, just as I did with Jim, and suggesting other changes, just as before. I still do the bookkeeping with Alan's help, and other banal stuff. I know a lot more fans now, of course; I went to JordanCon, DragonCon, and the Charleston and New York booksignings for The Gathering Storm. I can hardly wait until JordanCon 2, which as I type is 11 weeks and 1 day away.

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  • 16

    Interview: 2001

    Thus Spake the Creator (Paraphrased)

    Reporter (Robert Jordan Himself)

    Robert Jordan

    RJ writes 8-10 hours a day. He usually misses lunch, sometimes dinner too. If he takes a day off, it's because his wife says he's working too hard. He says he writes because he likes it.

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  • 17

    Interview: Oct 25th, 1994

    Robert Jordan

    He said the amount he writes on a single day varies widely. He said slow days could be 8-10 pages and fast days up to 30.

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  • 18

    Interview: Dec 7th, 2000

    CNN Interview (Verbatim)

    Robert Jordan

    The payoffs of hard work

    At a recent book-signing event, Jordan was gracious and accommodating with an estimated 300 fans who formed an orderly, expectant line that stretched around and outside of an Atlanta, Georgia, bookstore. Signing his chosen name and underscoring twice with a bold flourish on book after book, he thoughtfully considered questions and talked freely about his inspiration and writing process—lthings he has doubtless repeated at countless such appearances.

    "I work eight hours a day, six and sometimes seven days a week," he said. "In the past six months, it was 12, 14 hours a day. I tried to take half a day off a month, but I generally did not."

    For Jordan, such work is definitely paying off.

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  • 19

    Interview: Dec 5th, 2000

    Br00se

    The next question was concerning other projects he was working on.

    Robert Jordan

    His reply was that he wasn't working on any other projects, and that he can only work on one project at a time. When he was working on the Guide and New Spring, he had to stop working on the novel during that time.

    I missed the next question, but it was something about his computer use. He said that whenever he was at his computer, he was writing. Apart from checking his E-mail and updating his virus definitions files, about all he did on his computer was write.

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  • 20

    Interview: Dec 5th, 2000

    Robert Jordan

    Another question followed about the number of books. Same answer.

    He said that he writes about 8 hours a day 6 days a week when he is not on tour. He said something about when he was fishing, unless he was fly-fishing or was on the boat really having to work at it, he felt like he should be home writing.

    He then answered a question about living in Charleston; about how it was his favorite place to live out of the half dozen or so cities he felt that he would like to live in.

    He said that for this book it took two months from the time he handed in the final manuscript until he went on tour.

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  • 21

    Interview: May 15th, 2003

    Dario Olivero

    You are an extraordinarily prolific writer and have recently surpassed the standing of a giant like Stephen King. Do you work as much as him and so methodically as to touch upon obsession?

    Robert Jordan

    My method is very simple: I read the newspaper at breakfast, I go to my desk, replying to e-mails to which I must answer and ignore the rest. I begin to write and go on for seven or eight hours. If I remember lunch, otherwise straight through. Seven days a week. But I must say that if I want to go fishing, I drop everything and go.

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  • 22

    Interview: Jan 7th, 2013

    Harriet McDougal

    Computers made it easier. Actually, first an electric typewriter made it easier. Robert Jordan was an engineer by training, and he really liked a clean typescript. He had begun by writing by hand on yellow legal pads, and when he switched to a typewriter he called his work "typing" rather than "writing." This lasted for a while. He said, at one point, "The only difference between my work and that of a typist is that I have to make up what I type." But of course he loved it.

    And then computers entered our lives. I worked on a TRS-80, eventually adding an external drive; he cleverly bought an Apple III—a dog of a machine, which still contains some files we have never been able to access. Now that his papers and that machine are in the Addlestone Library of the College of Charleston, the archivists may be able to pry the information out.

    Footnote

    Harriet donated a collection of RJ's notes and other Wheel of Time items to the Addleston Library at the College of Charleston in September 2012.

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  • 23

    Interview: Jan 7th, 2013

    Harriet McDougal

    Then there came the days of compatible laptops, so that he could finish a chapter in his machine and give me the disk to read in my machine. I recall one book we finished this way in the Murray Hill Hotel, an easy jump from Tor's offices in the Flatiron building. When the chapter was ready I would jump in a taxi with my laptop to turn it in to Tor—then gallop back to the hotel for more editing.

    We were doing that because the book was late. Weren't they all? Tom Doherty performed miracles in getting the books produced in no time at all. But what Robert Jordan did under the pressure of deadlines—even if he missed them, the pressure was THERE—seems, as I look back, to be little short of miraculous, too.

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  • 24

    Interview: Apr, 2003

    Galgóczi Móni

    You have been dealing with the series at least 8-9 years. How many hours a day do you spend writing?

    Robert Jordan

    I write eight to nine hours a day, seven days a week. Last year, I only took six days off. Actually, I rarely enjoy that. I admit I am addicted to writing.

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  • 25

    Interview: Feb 20th, 2013

    Question

    I was amazed by the language, geography, people, and so on in the books, and I always wondered what Robert Jordan's office looked like. I thought it must be covered with maps and things relating to the books. What was it like to walk in there?

    Harriet McDougal

    What you saw first when you walked in was a plastic human skeleton. And it wears a Viking helmet. And then you saw the books. There was a bookcase filled with books on religions. There was another bookcase of Westerns. There was a very big printer, and a roll-top desk. But what there weren't were maps. They were all in his head.

    Brandon Sanderson

    There were a lot of weapons, though.

    Harriet McDougal

    There was a room full of edged weapons!

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