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Your search for the tag 'siri' yielded 6 results

  • 1

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    onelowerlight

    What first gave you the idea for Warbreaker? What was your first inspiration for it?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Warbreaker came from a lot of sources. Siri and Vivenna were side characters in a book I never finished. Vasher came from the line that starts the book. No space to post it here, but give it a read. Nightblood came because...well, I just wanted to have a talking sword.

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  • 2

    Interview: Apr 17th, 2012

    Google+ Hangout (Verbatim)

    Alex

    "I loved the character reversal that took place with Vivian and Siri..." and actually I'm enjoying that at the moment "...did you come up with that idea- was that an early idea in your planning or did it emerge as a result of the story writing itself?"

    Brandon Sanderson

    That's a good question, for most of those they were early ideas, my- I had two main themes for myself when writing Warbreaker, one was character reversals I wanted to play with the idea of reversed roles, you see it from the very beginning when the two sisters are forced to reverse roles and also the role reversal between Vasher and Denth.

    The other big thing was I wanted to work on my humor and try and approach new ways of being, of having humor in a book and seeing what different types of character humor I could use. It was really me delving into a lot of Shakespeare at the time and seeing the way he pulled reversals and the way he used multiple levels of humor and I wanted to play with that concept in fantasy novels, so a lot of those were planned. Some of them were not, some of them came spontaneously, as you're writing the book, you always come up with great ideas for books while you're working on them so you kind of see the evolution of a few of them.

    Warbreaker is posted for free on my website, the complete draft of it and I actually posted the first draft all the way through to the last draft and so you can actually take and compare the first draft to the very last draft and even the chapters as I wrote them you can see how some things were evolving and coming to be and I was realizing certain things while I was doing it and other things were, were very well foreshadowed from the beginning.

    Footnote

    Many early ideas from Warbreaker came from Mythwalker, an unfinished novel Brandon wrote a few years earlier. The "switched roles" theme was one of them.

    Mythwalker

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  • 3

    Interview: Sep, 2012

    llwvyn

    My question is in regards to the writing system. In Warbreaker, when Siri is teaching Susebron to read, she mentions the letter "shash," which we now know better as a Glyphair from WoK.

    so onto the questions:

    Are the two writing systems related, or is this a chance coincidence of names? If they are related, did they stem from the same source? (i.e., do the people of Nalthis and Roshar both descend from a more ancient group of people?) If I haven't gotten a RAFO yet, did the separation from these other people create the legends of being cast out of the Tranquiline Halls?

    Brandon Sanderson

    There are interesting connections around the cosmere between linguistics and some cultures. Though different groups of humans were created on different planets, the Shards all share a single point of origin. However, the Tranquiline Halls legends are not related to a Nalthis/Roshar connection.

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  • 4

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2013

    WorldCon Flash AMA (Verbatim)

    Ansalem (August 2013)

    A lot of your works that are stand alone novels or seemingly completed stories, you have announced or started working on sequels for. Are there any stories that you feel complete and don't need to work on the same world or characters again? Or do feel there is always some new tale to tell about every world you make?

    Thanks for being involved in the reddit community so much, and for writing books I've enjoyed very much.

    Brandon Sanderson

    It's hard, because the way I plot I always have to know what happened before the book and what will happen after the book. Knowing that doesn't mean that I have to continue. It's also hard, though, to say no to fans who are so passionate about a specific project.

    The Vin/Elend story is most certainly done. As is the Raoden/Sarene story, as is Siri's story from Warbreaker. So there are completed threads. There might be other stories to tell in those worlds, though, so I'll avoid closing the door on them for now. (That said, it did feel very good to finish the Wheel of Time for good, and look forward to putting some of my own works to rest in a similar way.)

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  • 5

    Interview: Jun 28th, 2016

    Question

    Siri mentions that Bluefinger's ability to keep track of time seems almost supernatural- is it supernatural?

    Brandon Sanderson

    No. Good Question.

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