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Your search for the tag 'the eye of the world' yielded 109 results

  • 1

    Interview: Nov 21st, 1998

    Robert Jordan

    Moiraine lost her list sometime between New Spring and The Eye of the World. By the opening of the story, all she could remember was that there had been a name from the Two Rivers.

    Footnote

    The novel version of New Spring had not been released at this time. The Legends version included a mention of Kari, which RJ decided to remove in the novel version because of the confusion: ["Kari al'Thor. From Andor? Husband Tamlin, Second Captain of he Illianer Companions, took discharge." That pair might have gone anywhere in the world and there was doubt she had had a child at all.]

    Tags

  • 2

    Interview: 2010

    Brandon Sanderson (29 July 2010)

    Lol. In making comments on Towers of Midnight, Maria referenced The Eye of the World...and found an as-of-yet uncaught mistake.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Oh, and I think the error Maria caught in The Eye of the World was a line saying Lan's homeland had the "hundred lakes" and not the "thousand lakes."

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  • 3

    Interview: 2010

    Terez (11 August 2010)

    Are there actually Warders and Aes Sedai guarding the Blight at all times? Or is that another TEOTWism?

    Brandon Sanderson (11 August 2010)

    Well, there are Aes Sedai and Warders staying with most Borderlander monarchs.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    I would say that yes, they are up there guarding. There are a disproportionate number, it seems, at times.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Morgase had one Aes Sedai, as did Berelain, to give advice. Borderlanders often have more.

    Footnote

    In the prologue of The Path of Daggers, 'Deceptive Appearances', it is made relatively clear that Paitar, Ethenielle, and Easar only had one advisor each.

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  • 4

    Interview: Oct 23rd, 1994

    Brian Bax

    Since I lived in the sticks, I decided to differ from the norm and went to the signing thinking there wouldn't be a vast crowd, I was wrong sigh. I did manage to get all of my books signed which was great. I talked with RJ, but he appeared to be very distant which is understandable considering his position. What was really neat was that I was able to talk with Mrs. Jordan for 20 minutes. First off, she was an angel. She talked a lot about things that her husband couldn't since he was busy signing books.

    Harriet McDougal Rigney

    It turns out that she's an editor for Tor, not only for her husband's work but for others as well. She said that The Eye of the World took four years to write because he had to create all of the countries in Randland first. As has been mentioned by others on the net, his first idea for the series is going to be the last scene; his next was the breaking down of Rand's door in The Eye of the World. The rest has been ad lib. from there.

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  • 5

    Interview: 2011

    Twitter 2011 (WoT) (Verbatim)

    Brandon Sanderson (3 January 2011)

    Man, I love the prologue of The Eye of the World. Some of my favorite writing in the entire series. Great insight into Ishamael's personality pre-madness.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    People like to talk of Rand's character development. Elan -> Ishamael -> Moridin is almost as interesting to me. His outlook has evolved so much.

    JUSTIN LEE

    Has it really evolved? he's still the megalomanical favorite/topdog he's always seen himself to be.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    No, he's really changed a lot. He's a fatalist now, as I mentioned to @dragonmount. He knows far more.

    JASON DENZEL

    How would you compare Ishamael's motivations from when he was Elan vs when he was Moridin?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Elan is actually more selfish. He still thinks he will rule, that the Dark One will take over the world and create a new one.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Moridin has been through madness and touched the mind of the Dark One. He is far more fatalistic, and actually less selfish.

    TEREZ

    And therefore...less predictable? :)

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    I was wondering if anyone would pick up on that quote in relation to my tweet.

    FOOTNOTE—TEREZ

    In TGS 39, Verin tells Egwene that the Dark One looks for selfishness more than any other trait in his leaders—namely, the Chosen—because it makes them predictable.

    AUSTIN MOORE

    Is it wrong for me to have been under the impression that Moridin isn't "mad?" I've thought he was less mad than he was...

    AUSTIN MOORE

    ...as Ishamael. Mad being crazy not mad being evil because obviously he's evil.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Moridin is less insane than Ishamael was. Much as Rand is less insane than Lews Therin was.

    AZRAL HANAN

    You say Moridin is less selfish. Is he now a Dark Buddha wanting to end the suffering of existence in the nirvana of oblivion?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    It's not that he's unselfish. But compare his lines in The Eye of the World and Knife of Dreams and Towers of Midnight to see the difference.

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  • 6

    Interview: 2011

    Twitter 2011 (WoT) (Verbatim)

    Jeff Edde (3 January 2011)

    Interesting. In The Eye of the World, Rand uses Light and Power. Is it significant that he uses Light and Power again in Towers of Midnight?

    Brandon Sanderson (3 January 2011)

    Yes.

    JEFF EDDE (12 JANUARY)

    Can Rand channel Light and Power as a result of touching the Eye of the World, or does he have access to it because he is who he is?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    It was the power in the Eye, so far as I know.

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  • 7

    Interview: 2011

    Twitter 2011 (WoT) (Verbatim)

    Derek Daniels (3 January 2011)

    Never did figure out what it is exactly that killed Lews Therin in the prologue. Thoughts after reread?

    Brandon Sanderson (3 January 2011)

    It's a toss up between getting consumed by holding too much Power and getting struck by that bolt of energy from the sky.

    Tags

  • 8

    Interview: 2011

    Twitter 2011 (WoT) (Verbatim)

    Brandon Sanderson (3 January 2011)

    Reading the start of The Eye of the World reminds me that there's an extra person in the cover art. (More obvious in the secondary, inside piece, I think.)

    RINA

    In the cover of The Eye of the World there's only Moraine, Lan, and one boy to the side. Am I looking at the wrong one?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    There are two covers. One ended up on the inside flaps. The outer one wraps around, though, and I think he's in both.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Here's the secondary cover: http://bit.ly/hZu0Uw

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    HCFFs already know who that person is, but it's a fun Easter egg to know that there's a story behind that extra figure.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    By the way, HCFF stands for "Hard Core Fan Freak" for those asking. They're self named. It's what many uber-wot-geeks call themselves.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Mr. Jordan wrote a large chunk of The Eye of the World with a fourth Two Rivers lad going along with Perrin, Mat, and Rand. Was to be a major character.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Harriet talked him out of it, pointing out that the fourth lad never did anything useful. @theoryland, do you guys have a good thread on him?

    TEREZ

    Nah, nothing to talk about really. But here is RJ saying that: http://bit.ly/RJ-BN2000

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    I've asked Harriet if she could dig up any of the old manuscript with the fourth ta'veren in it, but she's not certain they have any.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    She said she thinks he was Dannil, but couldn't remember for certain. Many think he was Ewin—a good guess and a possibility.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Cover art was commissioned when he was still a main character, and it was too late to change it when he was removed.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Looks like the fourth ta'veren was Dannil, in another form: http://bit.ly/h0iDIO (Look for Liandra's question.)

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Jason from @dragonmount says: "RJ once told me that Daniell's heroics ended up being done by the other Two Rivers boys."

    AZRAL HANAN

    What role would the so-called 'Fourth' ta'veren have played if he had been written into the story? Could you elaborate?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    I'd like to see the original drafts if I could. I do know RJ said his part was split among the other three.

    RINA

    Is the fourth boy (Dannil)'s name pronounced [dan-nil] or [daniel]?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    I say the first.

    Footnote

    Some fans think this is a BS story made up as an inside joke between RJ and Harriet about the cover art, mostly because the concept of three heroes seems to work better with the mythology that RJ used to develop them.

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  • 9

    Interview: 2011

    Twitter 2011 (WoT) (Verbatim)

    Brandon Sanderson (3 January 2011)

    Ha. Thom showing up at night, and people grumbling, makes me smile now knowing about the unwritten prequel involving his arrival.

    SKYLA GRIMES

    Weren't there two other planned prequels that never made it? Will they ever see the light of day?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Yes. But they probably won't be published, I'm afraid.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    For those asking, I'm not allowed to talk about the prequels yet. It's unlikely they'll be written. If they aren't, I'll see what I can say.

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  • 10

    Interview: 2011

    Twitter 2011 (WoT) (Verbatim)

    Brandon Sanderson (3 January 2011)

    WoT statistics: Egwene appears for the first time about 7% into The Eye of the World. She is the first person to fold her arms beneath her breasts.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    As much as we like to talk about Robert Jordan using that phrase, I think that's the only time it appears in The Eye of the World.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Amusing that, after all they've grown, Egwene and Rand's interaction in The Eye of the World 3 has many similarities to their interaction in Towers of Midnight.

    LAYLA MESSNER

    Took me a moment to realize this phrase did not refer to Egwene's breasts ;) RT @BrandonSandrson: "Amusing that, after all they've grown..."

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Lol. You just about killed me with laughter on that one.

    BRANDON SANDERSON (5 JANUARY)

    It bears remembering that of the group, only Egwene left the Two Rivers for adventure. The others were forced. (Or felt they were.)

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    This is very important for her character. In a way, she was the only one who chose this life intentionally. At least at first.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Aha. First braid tug I spotted was at the 30% mark.

    BRANDON SANDERSON (6 JANUARY)

    I wonder if Rand and Egwene dancing in Baerlon counts as a fulfillment of her Winternight promise to dance with him on Bel Tine.

    BRANDON SANDERSON (7 JANUARY)

    I'll admit, the Tinker scenes had me wishing—as a youth—for a Perrin+Egwene hook up. I never wanted her for Rand.

    BRANDON SANDERSON (12 JANUARY)

    "I'd like being your Warder." Rand to Egwene, near the end of The Eye of the World.

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  • 11

    Interview: 2011

    Twitter 2011 (WoT) (Verbatim)

    Brandon Sanderson (3 January 2011)

    And, here we have mention of Anla the Wise Counselor. For those not in the know, there is theorizing on her: http://bit.ly/f8s2T4

    FELIX PAX

    At least one...problem with that link...in "To Sail Beyond the Sunset" RJ refers to Robert Heinlein in The Great Hunt.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Didn't know that. Thanks.

    SHIVAM BHATT

    Will we see any more of those awesome references (Anla, Mosk and Merc, all the other tidbits) in the last book?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    There were some in my [WoT] books that I don't think have been caught yet.

    Tags

  • 12

    Interview: 2011

    Twitter 2011 (WoT) (Verbatim)

    Brandon Sanderson (4 January 2011)

    Back to reading The Eye of the World, all. Posts to follow. I'll try to keep it at a steady stream, not a flood.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    WoT Easter Egg: there's an easily overlooked line in the prologue of The Eye of the World which gives huge foreshadowing of things Rand can do in Towers of Midnight.

    TEREZ

    I always thought the fact that Lews Therin could sense that there were no people around for miles was interesting.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    I should have guessed that you'd be the only one who would pick out the right line, Terez.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    The Easter egg in the prologue has to do with Lews Therin sensing the lack of people around him for miles and miles.

    BRANDON SANDERSON (5 JANUARY)

    Regarding yesterday's Easter Egg, Maria mentions RJ was preparing a blog post on the concept.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    For those who missed it, it has to do with Lews Therin sensing nobody was nearby when he made Dragonmount.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    And before you ask, no, I can't say more. Sorry. Suffice it to say that what is in the books stands as enough of an answer, for now.

    TEREZ

    My original(ish) post on the ability to sense for people: http://bit.ly/safegates in '06. I was a noob(ish) then.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Interesting theory. What do you think of it now?

    TEREZ

    I think it still holds up (despite a few details I missed), but I think it's not what you were getting at. :)

    Footnote

    Most think this has something to do with the 'one with the land' thing. (See the Fisher King tag for more info.)

    Tags

  • 13

    Interview: 2011

    Twitter 2011 (WoT) (Verbatim)

    Brandon Sanderson (5 January 2011)

    This now reads interestingly: "With all his heart & desperation, he silently shouted at Bela to run...tried to will strength into her...

    ZEERAK WASEEM

    The Bela thing?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Rand heals Bela of her fatigue before Moiraine can.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Since people are asking, Rand's first use of the Power is healing Bela of her fatigue. He feels the effects later in Baerlon, I think.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Are there any Theorylanders/Dragonmounters who can confirm this for me? Maybe give some specifics or a thread for people?

    ADAM PETTY

    Didn't Moiraine bring that to his attention at the end of The Eye of the World or The Dragon Reborn?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    I think she did, but either way, I missed it first read-through.

    JO KENEBEL

    Actually doesn't Moiraine confirm it later, she says something like "I had suspicions from the first...then there was Bela..."

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    I was asking for confirmation on his sickness, not whether he channeled. :)

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    On the subject of Rand's channeling, a lot of people are bringing up the event on the ship outside of Shadar Logoth.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    I'll talk about this when we get there. I've read a lot of theories on this one arguing for both sides. I've never made up my mind.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Wotfaq on Rand channeling: http://bit.ly/fBBrCz I've read enough questions from theory-types on the second one to make me question.

    TEREZ

    Like what? Seems pretty straightforward to me.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    And...Linda to the rescue. Once again, 13th Depository has an exhaustive look at all this: http://bit.ly/gYgU7Z (Thanks @einarjh.)

    TEREZ

    She doesn't question it either. :D I have not seen a case against it. Also, Vin using up her 'luck' reminded me of that. :)

    MATT HATCH

    Brandon, come on over. We'd love to "entertain" your theory against Bela. :)

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    My theory against Bela?

    MATT HATCH

    Thought "theories on this one arguing for both sides. I've never made up my mind" meant you were undecided on Bela...

    MATT HATCH

    ...as the first instance of channeling. But now I see you were speaking of the sickness.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    The ship is what I was talking about. I remember reading, in the early days, some people trying to refute that one.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    The reason everyone misses the first times Rand channels is because the sickness after the lightning is so much more memorable.

    HBFFERREIRA

    The mast swinging and killing a Trolloc, right? I remember thinking ta'veren during my re-read.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    That's what I thought for a long time too. Might still think it. I want to watch it this read.

    LUCKERS

    Re: Rand's first channelings—do you know of the theory that Rand channeled to bring them to the Eye...

    LUCKERS

    Compare the last few moments before they reach the Eye with when Rand heals Bela of her tiredness.

    LUCKERS

    If that is one of the first channelings, it's not on any list. Always intrigued me. RJ was so subtle sometimes.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    I'll watch for that, Luckers. Thanks for the heads up.

    BRANDON SANDERSON (7 JANUARY)

    Okay, we come to Rand using the One Power to swing the boom on the ship and hit the Trolloc. The argument against this one...

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    ...is that the Power doesn't actually seem to move the boom. The boat shakes for some reason, which swings it down.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    In the other two cases, Rand does something actively. In this, it seems more accidental. It's enough of an argument to make me wonder.

    TEREZ

    Who says Rand didn't shake the boat with the Power? Besides, the aftereffects are what make us sure.

    LINDA TAGLIERI

    I agree. He jolted the boat which dislodged many Trollocs and the boom swept the one attacking him away.

    JOHN IN PUEBLO

    Are you saying him being ta'veren caused it to move?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    I'm saying I've been made to wonder. The biggest point against it is the sickness he feels after.

    BRANDON SANDERSON (10 JANUARY)

    So, Rand on the rigging really must be an after-effect of channeling. But it doesn't HAVE to mean he did it on the night with the boat.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    It could have happened in the days between, and... and I'm sounding like @theoryland, aren't I? You guys are a bad influence on me.

    TEREZ

    If you actually hung out @theoryland you would never put such an unsupported theory forward for fear of our scorn. ;)

    TEREZ

    Sometimes, Occam's Razor is your friend. Alas.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Ha. You want me to think your theories are all well-supported? You think I haven't heard @theoryland's Avi theory?

    TEREZ

    Hey, that was MY theory. And it was way more supported than yours! hmph... (though I didn't believe it really)

    MATT HATCH

    Ouch. I should get Jenn to do an Asmodean panel at JordanCon. I need an outlet for my glossary disdain.

    TEREZ

    While all of us in the apathy camp think the glossary reveal was JUST PERFECT TAKE THAT YOU CHUMPS.

    MATT HATCH

    Of course you were happy, because it was the apathetic way to reveal it...I really need that panel, Jenn!

    JENNIFER LIANG

    Tell Shannan. I think we have room for another theory panel.

    TEREZ

    Also, Moiraine clearly says that early unconscious channeling always comes in response to a desperate need.

    TEREZ

    We know it was smooth sailing after they left Shadar Logoth, so no opportunity to make Rand channel.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Where did you get the idea that this was my theory? Just something I was curious about. :P

    TEREZ

    Just from the fact that you were, you know, defending it. :p I know you said you had read it back in the day though.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Unfortunately, I don't really GET to have theories any more, since I can just look up the answers or ask Maria. :(

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    And the theories I do have I don't really get to post about, since they will influence the series end. Maybe once A Memory of Light is done,

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    I'll pick a few things the notes are silent on, explain that they're silent, then jump in with some good, old-fashioned theories.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    That won't stop me from making random comments as I read, though, so maybe those count as my theories.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    I am keeping a list, though, to get answers on as I go. Already got a few, actually....

    TEREZ

    That would be awesome. In the meantime, feel free to defend silly theories. It gives us something to do. ;)

    Tags

  • 14

    Interview: 2011

    Twitter 2011 (WoT) (Verbatim)

    Brandon Sanderson (6 January 2011)

    Lan to Thom, as they prepare to flee: "You can ride with us, or ride to Shayol Ghul, gleeman." Well...actually...

    LUCKERS

    I'm curious, do you think RJ intended Thom as a red-herring for who brought the Trollocs on Winternight?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    I think he wanted us to wonder about Moiraine, honestly. Just a little. I don't think Thom was a red herring, but maybe.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    I think "Wow, someone BROUGHT the Trollocs?" was the surprise. We didn't know they had anyone on the inside, so to speak.

    Tags

  • 15

    Interview: 2011

    Twitter 2011 (WoT) (Verbatim)

    Brandon Sanderson (8 January 2011)

    Much has been made of the blue flash when Thom fights the Fade. I can't say what it was, but it's not what most seem to think.

    Tags

  • 16

    Interview: 2011

    Twitter 2011 (WoT) (Verbatim)

    Shannon Alexy (10 January 2011)

    Do you include the chapter Ravens on your The Eye of the World reread or not since it's not part of the original publishing?

    Brandon Sanderson (10 January 2011)

    I'll read it, I just have to dig it out. I can't remember where I stuck it.

    Tags

  • 17

    Interview: 2011

    Twitter 2011 (WoT) (Verbatim)

    Brandon Sanderson (10 January 2011)

    Curious: First mention of the Fisher King concept happens when Rand is dreaming, still half-sick, in the back of Bunt's wagon.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Is this our first Lews Therin moment? Bunt wouldn't have mentioned it, and neither would have Ishamael. Unless it's actually something Thom said.

    TEREZ

    I assumed was a True Dream, including Thom's connection to the queen, and Rand & Tam with the sword.

    TEREZ

    But the first Lews Therin moment was in chapter nine when Rand recognized Shayol Ghul (and maybe Ishamael too).

    MATT HATCH

    I'd say Ishamael recognition is a fact in chapter nine. There are some nice comparisons with the prologue.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Well, you probably have a point there. Though you might argue that this is a shade of Lews Therin speaking to him, for the first time.

    TEREZ

    I might, but I wouldn't. :D It's more interesting to me the other way, and Rand didn't dream Lews Therin's dreams much.

    TEREZ

    He remarked on the strangeness of it in The Path of Daggers before Lews Therin came back (after having been chased away by Cadsuane).

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Wait. What?

    TEREZ

    I remembered it wrong. Lord of Chaos 19: 'Lews Therin's dreams. That had never happened before, not dreaming the man's dreams.'

    TEREZ

    In A Crown of Swords 41 while Lews Therin is gone, Rand still hears the voice in a dream.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Oh, I see what you're saying. (I think.) Is your argument this: "Lews Therin doesn't talk to Rand in dreams. Therefore, this isn't Lews Therin?"

    LUCKERS

    I think deep down her argument is probably more 'Lews Therin doesn't talk to Rand at all'. ;)

    TEREZ

    Whether Lews Therin really talks to Rand at all or not, this would be quite atypical & strange. As Thom? Why?

    LUCKERS

    Why would Lews Therin speak as Thom? The moustaches baby, the moustaches.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Curious. So who do you think is speaking to Rand the Fisher King words, if it's not a Lews Therin memory?

    TEREZ

    It's a dream. Why does there have to be a 'real' ;) person involved?

    TEREZ

    But I do appreciate the hint. :) [That is, the hint that Lews Therin was also one with the land, and was aware of it. This might be what Brandon was getting at with his Easter egg thing.]

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    I don't normally dream things that happen to be word-for-word true prophecies. Rand's not a Dreamer. He got the info somewhere.

    TEREZ

    Now I'm going to cry. :( Why can't Rand be a Dreamer?? So chapter nine was completely fabricated by Ishamael? That is weird.

    TEREZ

    None of the other dreams influenced by Ishamael were anything like that. How did he create all of those people in Tar Valon?

    TEREZ

    Why would Ishamael first prevent Rand from reaching Tar Valon, and then force him to go to the Tower? Makes no sense. :(

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Lol. I'm not sure if you're being serious or not. Is there some theory on Rand being a Dreamer that I should know?

    TEREZ

    I'm being serious. There's a hint Asmodean's warding might prevent True Dreams. Also...

    TEREZ

    Egwene was guided to it, but Rand had no one to guide him if he was a Dreamer. And everything in The Eye of the World nine was true.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Either it's Lews Therin, it's something someone told him in the real world, or it's Ishamael giving him the info.

    TEREZ

    Maybe he had heard The Karaethon Cycle from Thom at fireside on the way to Baerlon, though. Would make sense.

    TEREZ

    Well, not on the way to Baerlon, since he mentions them for the first time in Baerlon. But maybe on the Spray.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    I'll entertain an argument that it's basically 'known' information, or that Thom mentioned it.

    LUCKERS

    Did you see my cultural idea? That it might be Rand's subconscious—like the way everyone knows the Dark One's name?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    But it really seems like a memory, and we've never seen people mentioning it, while naming the Dark One we see.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    I'll look up answers on this one for sure; right now, I'm just speaking by instinct. But I read the Fisher King concept as...

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    ...coming from Lews Therin/Rand's subconscious and being fed through Thom's mouth as Rand's mind fit it into the dream.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    I'm also pretty sure Rand's not a Dreamer, though he does have uncommon power over his dreams.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    But he does not see specific prophecies in his dreams (other than a few debatable moments) nor enter Tel'aran'rhiod spontaneously.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    But I'll look into it. I rebel against it because Dreaming is basically Egwene's thing.

    TEREZ

    Also, didn't Perrin pretty much just show her that it wasn't HER thing any more? :p

    TEREZ

    And yeah, I know his prophetic dreams only happen in Tel'aran'rhiod. But I just want a male Dreamer dangit!

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Perrin does something different. Also, Egwene was caught off guard and had been spending a lot of time lately doing other things.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    It would be unwise to assume that Perrin is better at Tel'aran'rhiod than she is because of that moment. He had just spent weeks training...

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    ...specifically to fight like that in Tel'aran'rhiod, while Egwene has been forced to fight other fights and let herself get a tad rusty.

    TEREZ

    haha, yeah I know. I have argued much the same against Egwene-haters. I did enjoy that moment though.

    TEREZ

    Why do all the prophets have to be female? Foretelling I can see because of the taint, but the rest? Except Perrin.

    TEREZ

    The Thom dream used to make me think I was missing something, or maybe a deleted scene. Very odd.

    TEREZ

    Also, even with the taint seems like we should have had a male Foretelling by now, or a dreamer. Something.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Well, out of fondness, I'll let you know that I DO know of at least one male (other than Perrin) who can see the future.

    TEREZ

    lol. The male Aelfinn?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Dang. You're too clever. Okay, then, I promise you there's actually a man—human—who meets your requirements.

    Footnote

    In retrospect, it seems most likely that RJ did in fact pare down Thom's earlier conversation about the prophecies (in The Eye of the World Chapter 13, or in another place), not wanting to give too much away. The dream in Chapter 34 should have been a recollection of what Thom had told him. It's possible that Brandon was correct and it had something to do with Lews Therin, but I find it unlikely for many reasons (some covered in the conversation). Also worth noting is that in the previous chapter, during Rand's fever dreams, Thom mentioned the Black Ajah, which had not previously been mentioned to Rand on screen. Also, this hint from Brandon was the first of many concerning the male prophet; the other clues make it pretty clear that Moridin is a Dreamer.

    Tags

  • 18

    Interview: Oct 30th, 1994

    Robert Jordan

    Newsflash!

    The covers aren't as bad as we thought they were. The 'extra' character in The Eye of the World really was in the book, but was cut out later, because he had too little to do. His parts were distributed out to the other characters, but they never got around to cutting him from the cover.

    Tags

  • 19

    Interview: Jun 16th, 1995

    Robert Jordan

    There is nothing he would have done basically different with hindsight in the writing of TWoT. Originally The Eye of the World was half as large as it was printed, but the later books have been written so "tight" from the start that it has been impossible to shorten them.

    His writing technique with the WoT books he described as "simply stretch out and run".

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  • 20

    Interview: Jun 16th, 1995

    Robert Jordan

    First, the question of Hake's inn in The Eye of the World is answered: it is not a whorehouse, at least not more than any other inn. :-) Due to the increase in women's power, the very concept of prostitution is unknown; but women have much greater freedom in choosing their partners, both casual and permanent. He specifically mentioned Mat's little escapades with various maids and serving-girls.

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  • 21

    Interview: Oct 9th, 1996

    Question

    New Dreadlords? Via True Power? What are limits of True Power? When did we see it used before?

    Robert Jordan

    Access to the True Power is a matter of wanting it and the Dark One letting you. NOT black cords. In the Prologue to The Eye of the World we saw True Power used to heal insanity. The One Power cannot be used to heal insanity. True Power used at Shayol Ghul will fry you instantly.

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  • 22

    Interview: Nov 11th, 1997

    Joar from Costa Mesa, CA

    You have mentioned that you intentionally tried to recreate some of the feel of Tolkien's Middle Earth, especially in the first book. Considering many of the similar elements between the stories and the fact that time in your world is cyclical, with heroes being reborn through the ages, did you intend to imply that Middle Earth could possibly be "an Age long past, an Age yet to come"?

    Robert Jordan

    Certainly not. In the first hundred pages of The Eye of the World I did try to invoke a Tolkienesque feel. But after that I have certainly not tried to reflect in any way Middle Earth. As a matter of fact, beginning back in that very early part of The Eye of the World, I deliberately took off in a very different direction from Tolkien and I've been running hard in that direction ever since.

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  • 23

    Interview: Nov 11th, 1997

    Nansen from Ithaca, NY

    Hi, just curious. In the last section of The Eye of the World, Lan says that the bond does not tell him the direction where his Aes Sedai is exactly; it is just a general feeling. But then later in the series, both he and Rand had the ability to tell an exactly straight line direction the location of whom they are bonded to. Is this an inconsistency or is there an explanation? Thanks!

    Robert Jordan

    Yes. There is an explanation. A change that was supposed to be made in manuscript in The Eye of the World and did not get set into type and which I t been corrected. I have been trying to get that changed every since I discovered that The Eye of the World has been published with the erroneous information. I hope they are still not printing the books with it.

    Footnote

    Encyclopaedia WoT keeps a list of errata here.

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  • 24

    Interview: Oct 19th, 1998

    Phoenix from Chico, CA

    Mr. Jordan: First, congratulations on your new book. I'm absolutely dying to read it, and I'm sure it will be as awesome as the rest. My question regards The Eye of the World: Near the end of the book Rand hears a voice that vibrates his skull with its intensity. Was that the Creator talking to him? I believe the voice even said, "I will take no part..."

    Robert Jordan

    Read and find out. Ain't I a stinker?

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  • 25

    Interview: Oct 29th, 1998

    Robert Jordan

    As the line was drying up, the crowd apparently consisted mainly of several booksellers. They got talking about first edition printings of the hardcovers for The Eye of the World. Jordan said that he has a whole box of them at home, and that he should give the bunch of them to his son, so he can finance all his children's college educations... At a later time, he said that he heard recently from a used fantasy dealer that an unsigned first printing The Eye of the World was sold from his store for $700 dollars. RJ said he had heard of prices around $300, but not that high. He also said he heard of first printing Lord of Chaos's going at $55, which he seemed to think was absurd, since well over 200,000 had been printed. They also commented that at times, the hardcovers have been hard to find, but not because they had been out of print, but because "sensible" people assumed they would be out of print. He said that his books "break the rules", in that hardcovers aren't supposed to stay in print for 8-9 years. He also said that at one point, a computer "glitch" resulted in stores remaindering The Shadow Rising while there was still a high demand for it at the normal price (10,000 sales annually without any advertising). Someone else mentioned that they had been to a bookstore recently which had the hardcover A Crown of Swords both for sale at the regular price and on the remaindering table. Jordan expressed significant disgust with screw-ups of this sort.

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  • 26

    Interview: Nov 11th, 1998

    Slayer

    Do Min's viewings always predict the future, or do some tell about the past, mainly the seven towers around Lan in The Eye of the World?

    Robert Jordan

    Um, her viewings are always concerning the future.

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  • 27

    Interview: Sep 20th, 1999

    Robert Jordan

    The shimmering thing with Ishamael in the prologue of The Eye of the World was because of a True Power gateway!

    Tags

  • 28

    Interview: Sep 20th, 1999

    Robert Jordan

    RJ confirmed that Ishamael's strange gateway at the start of The Eye of the World was due to his use of the True Power.

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  • 29

    Interview: Mar, 2000

    Paul Ward

    Possible question: Is the Dark One pure True Power? Why does the Creator ignore Randland except to talk to Rand at the end of The Eye of the World?

    Robert Jordan

    No, the Dark One is not pure True Power. Who says the Creator takes little interest in the activities of mankind? And I will neither confirm nor deny that the Creator spoke to Rand.

    Paul Ward

    Neither confirm nor deny? What's up with that?

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  • 30

    Interview: Nov 11th, 2000

    Liandra from The Netherlands

    I understand there would be a person in The Eye of the World, but that he was cut out or something. Who was he?

    Robert Jordan

    One of the characters who I have brought in later was a fellow named Daniell in The Eye of the World, and I brought him out because I realized he didn't have anything to do there. I reintroduced him later. At that point, he was simply taking up space.

    Footnote

    There was a detailed conversation with Brandon on this subject during his re-read of 2011.

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  • 31

    Interview: Nov 11th, 2000

    Ethan Hayes from Colorado Springs, CO

    First off, I would like to compliment you on having such a wonderful series. I have one question for you, however, about being a writer. How is it that you made yourself transition from planning the series and what was going to happen in the series and building the history, etc.; into the actual creation of the first novel? How did you know when to stop planning and to start writing?

    Robert Jordan

    Well, in this particular instance, I simply reached a point where I thought I was ready to start, and in some ways I turned out to be wrong! That's why it took four years to write The Eye of the World, I realized that there were a number of things I had to work out very far in advance from what I believed.

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  • 32

    Interview: Nov 11th, 2000

    Meg Young from Florida

    In a previous question you stated that it took you so long to write The Eye of the World because you realized a number of things you hadn't yet researched. What sort of things were these, and how did you survive the more tedious aspects of world-building (i.e., lists of government official names, lists of cities and their major imports and exports, etc.)?

    Robert Jordan

    Well, the tedious bits were quite easy, and it wasn't so much a matter of research I hadn't done as things that needed to be worked out—which I thought could wait until later because they were not going to come into the books until later. But I realized once I began writing that I had to realize how those things worked and fit together NOW, because that would affect how things happened in that first book.

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  • 33

    Interview: Dec, 2000

    Orbit Interview (Verbatim)

    Orbit

    Of the nine books published so far, which one has your favorite cover?

    Robert Jordan

    The Eye of the World.

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  • 34

    Interview: May, 2001

    Ruhira Sedai

    You've said before that the blue flashes during the fight with the Myrddraal in Whitebridge were not from Thom's daggers. What were they from?

    Robert Jordan

    RAFO!!!

    SORILEA

    Wow... I agreed with Ruhira that I really thought we should get an answer to this.

    ROBERT JORDAN

    RJ went on to explain that there are three types of ideas that are floating around in his head about the series. Things that he must include, because they are the major turning points for a character, storyline, etc; things he wants to include, because he thinks they give a little more in depth knowledge about a character, etc; and things that would be nice to include. Unfortunately he says that the explanation regarding Thom's daggers falls into the last category. But, on the chance that he will get to include it, he doesn't want to give away anything. So hopefully, this means that at some point, we will revisit Whitebridge and find out some more about it, as well as what the flashes were from.

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  • 35

    Interview: Apr 6th, 2001

    Vanin

    What did Aginor mean in The Eye of the World when pointing towards Mat and saying something about old history, old friend, old enemy?

    Robert Jordan

    RAFO you horsethief!

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  • 36

    Interview: Apr 8th, 2001

    KuraFire

    Ah yes, KuraFire asked about the prologue of The Eye of the World, where Ishamael Traveled, but with a different description than that of usual Traveling.

    Robert Jordan

    Jordan said that that was because the Traveling was done by using the True Power. We'd seen the same since, when Moridin Travels somewhere..."The Pattern screamed."

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  • 37

    Interview: 2003

    Orbit Interview (Verbatim)

    Orbit Books

    Ezine understands you have two other side-novels planned, as well as continuing with further volumes in the epic saga. Will these also be prequels—can you give us any clues as to the content?

    Robert Jordan

    Basically, one of the two will tell how and why Tam al'Thor resigned his position as Second Captain of the Companions, the elite Illianer military unit, and returned to the Two Rivers to buy a farm. The second will reveal how and why Moiraine ended up in Emond's Field at just the right time in The Eye of the World.

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  • 38

    Interview: Jan 18th, 2003

    Robert Jordan

    Rand has no direct connection with the Creator. The Creator is completely removed from the world; aside from...creating...the Pattern, he does nothing else whatsoever to influence anything.

    Tallis

    (I'm uncertain how this fits with the ending of The Eye of the World.)

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  • 39

    Interview: Jan 21st, 2003

    SFRevu Interview (Verbatim)

    Ernest Lilley

    Crossroads of Twilight is book ten in the Wheel of Time series. The idea of reading all ten daunts me.

    Robert Jordan

    Well, don't let it. You can give it a try and see how you like it, but you must start with book one, The Eye of the World. You would be absolutely lost trying to start with the most recent book, but The Eye of the World has a completeness to it so that unlike the other books it really can stand alone. So, even if you decide not to read on, it makes sense on its own.

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  • 40

    Interview: Jan 21st, 2003

    SFRevu Interview (Verbatim)

    Ernest Lilley

    Is there anything else we should talk about?

    Robert Jordan

    Well, no...except to once again emphasize that you cannot start with Crossroads of Twilight. You must begin with The Eye of the World (laughs).

    Ernest Lilley

    And The Eye of the World can stand on its own.

    Robert Jordan

    Yes, and you don't have to go on, but it is the beginning and you learn things. I don't try to repeat the character's lessons. I simply assume in the later books that you have read what has gone before. You will know.

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  • 41

    Interview: Feb 9th, 2003

    Bill Thompson

    It is a mistake to view "The Wheel of Time" cycle as a series. Rather like Tolkien's "The Lord of the Rings," to which it is most often compared, "The Wheel of Time" is a single novel built of multiple books.

    Robert Jordan

    "I'm doing something that hasn't been done, I guess, since (English novelist Anthony) Trollope. I am writing a very long, multivolume novel. You can read the first book, The Eye of the World, and stop, and feel you've read something that has enough resolution that you don't feel you have to read more. But you still have to start there."

    Bill Thompson

    Jordan cautions readers not to attempt to pick up the story in midstream, much less get one's feet wet with the most recent volume. Not until one has read books one through nine.

    Robert Jordan

    "You cannot start by reading Crossroads of Twilight. If you do you will be bitterly disappointed. In ten pages you'll give up. You have to start with The Eye of the World, which has been continuously in print in hardcover for 13 years. There aren't many books that can match that."

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  • 42

    Interview: Jan 6th, 2004

    NY, NY

    Why was there a blue light flashing when Thom met the Fade in Whitebridge?

    Robert Jordan

    Because Thom's best knives are very special indeed.

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  • 43

    Interview: Jan 6th, 2004

    Aurora, Ontario, Canada

    What are the other short novels you are thinking about doing before you complete the series?

    Robert Jordan

    One would explain why Tam al'Thor abandoned a successful career to return to the Two Rivers and buy a farm. And the other one will, I hope, explain exactly how Moiraine turned up in the Two Rivers just in the nick of time in The Eye of the World.

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  • 44

    Interview: Apr 27th, 2004

    Wotmania Interview (Verbatim)

    Wotmania

    Did Ishamael come to Lews Therin Telamon's palace in the prologue of The Eye of The World to kill him?

    Robert Jordan

    No. To taunt him with his defeat. Ishamael would much rather have had Lews Therin alive and suffering from the knowledge of defeat, not to mention the murder of his wife and other blood kin, than simply dead.

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  • 45

    Interview: Apr 27th, 2004

    Wotmania Interview (Verbatim)

    Wotmania

    Did the Creator talk to Rand at the end of The Eye of The World?

    Robert Jordan

    RAFO.

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  • 46

    Interview: Jul 22nd, 2004

    Robert Jordan

    Andor was the first nation that he really developed when writing The Eye of the World. He did not fully develop other nations or areas until later on. He "sketched" the other countries, while he drew Andor out more fully.

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  • 47

    Interview: Sep 2nd, 2005

    Isabel

    I started asking him about the two conflicting chats [regarding Thom's knives and the scene with the Mryddraal at Whitebridge in The Eye of the World]. The question was already sent to him, but he declined to answer it for the question and answer session. I was wondering about why he would do it, but as you might guess when reading his answer. It's because it's a RAFO question.

    Robert Jordan

    Both answers on the chat are RIGHT!!!! He knows exactly how Thom managed to escape with only a limp and how he managed to survive that. But he might use it in the next book and doesn't want to give away anything. So we have to do it with the knowledge that both answers, although seemingly conflicting, are both CORRECT.

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  • 48

    Interview: Sep 2nd, 2005

    Question

    You say one more main sequence book after Knife of Dreams, but will there be any more?

    Robert Jordan

    I intend to do two prequels; one is why Tam al'Thor gave up a successful military career and went home to buy a small farm in the Two Rivers. And the other one will be largely why and how Moiraine and Lan showed up in the nick of time in The Eye of the World. When I will do those two novels, I do not know.

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  • 49

    Interview: Oct 2nd, 2005

    Robert Jordan

    For Cooner 1987, I don't think there is any similarity between Hobbits and the Two Rivers folk. The Two Rivers people are based on a lot of country people I have known, and among whom I did a lot of my growing up. I did try to make the first roughly 100 pages of Eye seem somewhat Tolkienesque. I wanted to say, "This is the place you know, guys. Now we're going somewhere else." And then the Trolloc kicked in the farmhouse door. But I didn't take it to the point of trying to make the Two Rivers folk seem like Hobbits. I mean, I love The Lord of the Rings and have read it at least a dozen times, but when you have too many Hobbits together, they can be so bloody cute that I need a stiff drink.

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  • 50

    Interview: Oct 20th, 2005

    Robert Jordan

    When the Blight receded in The Eye of the World, the plants actually healed (new plants didn't immediately appear from elsewhere).... minor detail, but good to know.

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  • 51

    Interview: Oct 22nd, 2005

    Robert Jordan

    RJ also briefly outlined in what was my favorite part of the Q and A the nature of the other two prequels. Specifically what made Tam al'Thor decide to give up a "lucrative military career" and move to the Two Rivers and buy a small farm, and how Lan and Moiraine arrived in the Two Rivers when they did in The Eye of the World. RJ also briefly mentioned that we would meet Kari al'Thor (Rand's surrogate mother) and how she came to meet Tam. All in all they were obvious answers, but nice to hear RJ confirming them all the same.

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  • 52

    Interview: Mar, 2006

    Robert Jordan

    Before I start a book I always sit down and try to think how much of the story I can put into it. The outline is in my head until I sit down and start doing what I call a ramble, which is figuring how to put in the bits and pieces. In the beginning, I thought The Wheel of Time was six books and I'd be finished in six years. I actually write quite fast. The first Conan novel I did took 24 days. (I wrote seven Conan books—for my sins—but they paid the bills for a number of years.) For my Western, I was under severe time constraints in the contract so it was 98,000 words in 21 days—a killer of a schedule, especially since I was not working on a computer then, just using an IBM Correcting Selectric!

    I started The Wheel of Time knowing how it began and how it all ended. I could have written the last scene of the last book 20 years ago—the wording would be different, but what happened would be the same. When I was asked to describe the series in six words, I said, 'Cultures clash, worlds change—cope. I know it's only five, but I hate to be wordy.' What I intended to do was a reverse-engineered mythology to change the characters in the first set of scenes into the characters in the last set of scenes, a bunch of innocent country folk changed into people who are not innocent at all. I wanted these boys to be Candides as much as possible, to be full of 'Golly, gee whiz!' at everything they saw once they got out of their home village. Later they could never go back as the same person to the same place they'd known.

    But I'd sit down and figure I could get so much into a story, then begin writing and realize halfway in that I wasn't even halfway through the ramble. I'd have to see how I could rework things and put off some of the story until later. It took me four years to write The Eye of the World, and I still couldn't get as much of the story into it as I wanted; same with The Great Hunt. I finally reached a point where I won't have to do that. For Knife of Dreams I thought, "I've got to get all of that into one book: it's the penultimate volume!" And I did. Well, with one exception, but that's OK. That one exception would probably have added 300 pages to the book but I see how to put it in the last volume in fewer.

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  • 53

    Interview: Jan 26th, 2008

    Brandon Sanderson

    I'm hoping to be able to do more than one post per book, but I'd already started The Eye of the World when I finally got time to write this. I'll probably only do one post for the first book, then, which is a tragedy, since it has long been one of my favorites of the series. I also feel that it will be VERY important to writing Book Twelve. The Wheel turns; ages become new again and ideas return. I feel that the last book of the series should have numerous hearkenings back to this first book; that will give a sense of closure to this section of the Pattern and fit with the motif of the Wheel's turning.

    That's just my gut instinct, and I'm not promising anything specific or even referencing material from the Twelfth Book. I'm only speaking of my general feelings as a writer, but Mr. Jordan's notes are far more important than any of my instincts.

    As I read through this first book again, I was shocked by how well he had foreshadowed the later books in the series. This is the first time I'm reading WHEEL OF TIME all the way through as a professional novelist. I see things differently than I once did. I know how difficult it is to foreshadow across an entire series, and am frankly astounded by how well Mr. Jordan laid the groundwork for his future books. Min's prophesies are one great example, but equally potent is Mr. Jordan's use of mythology and story as a means of preparing the reader for events such as the Great Hunt, future interactions with the Aiel (and the People's relationship with them), and the coming of the Seanchan.

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  • 54

    Interview: Apr, 2001

    Gerhard Hormann

    When one starts a series like The Wheel of Time, one most likely doesn’t know that it would will take over nine book and 6000 pages to tell the complete story.

    Robert Jordan

    No. When I started this series, there were only two commonly used means of publishing: a single book or a trilogy. I, however, told my publisher: this won’t be a trilogy, but a series of at least four or five volumes, possibly even six. At that time I knew the overall content of the story, I knew what events I wanted to put in them and also had the final completely ready-made in my head. But I soon discovered that I could fit much less in the first book than I thought. That first book was actually supposed to hold the story of The Great Hunt and at least a part of The Dragon Reborn. At that point, I though: “Okay, it will probably be six or seven books.” Exactly the same thing happened to the second book. At this point, I no longer dare make predictions how long the series will eventually become. It will end sometime, I swear, but I don’t know when exactly that will be.

    Gerhard Hormann

    So there will be some more volumes?

    Robert Jordan

    After Winter’s Heart, there will be about three volumes. At least, I hope that it won’t be much more.

    Gerhard Hormann

    Why do you hope that? Because you’re starting to get enough of it, yourself?

    Robert Jordan

    Absolutely not! But because it feels like I’m still working on the same book. What people consider nine volumes of a series, is in fact one huge novel. And it feels like I am only at three quarters of the story. It won’t be finished before I have typed out that final scene. And I really want to finish it. So it’s really not a case of me not liking it anymore. Quite the opposite: I love doing it. When the series is finished, I might miss it more than I can imagine right now. For fifteen years, I have been working on the Wheel of Time series. And that’s a hell of a long time for one project.

    Gerhard Hormann

    Most readers will be excited at the prospect of at least three more volumes!

    Robert Jordan

    People have told me that before, and every time I feel a great relief. They might just as well have gotten fed up with it. But that is not happening. People are, like you said, actually excited that it will keep going for a while. In fact: they’re already asking if there might be a sequel! But on that, I have to disappoint them...

    Gerhard Hormann

    There must be an enormous pressure on you to continue. For many people, the series has become a part of their lives; something they’re very attached to.

    Robert Jordan

    People will miss it. And I do expect pressure from every side to continue, including from my publisher. It is very tempting to come up with more of the same after this, but I think I am strong enough to resist that.

    Gerhard Hormann

    Your colleague Terry Brooks has succumbed to the temptation and has returned to Shannara with his latest series.

    Robert Jordan

    Correct. There are more writers that do that. But what I always tell my readers, is this: I don’t write for you, I write for my own enjoyment. I already have a clear picture of what I want to do after this, and I hope that by that time, my readers will be willing to follow me there.

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  • 55

    Interview: Apr, 2001

    Gerhard Hormann

    Could this series have been written if The Lord of the Rings had not existed?

    Robert Jordan

    Hard to say. The Lord of the Rings is a milestone in the genre and in a sense laid the groundwork for what we currently call fantasy. The first 100 pages of The Eye of the World are quite similar to it. In it, you’ll find the idyllic, pristine world as in the world of Tolkien. But from that moment on, the story takes a completely different turn. My series doesn’t only touch back to British folklore, but to all religions of the world. Women don’t play a secondary role, but make up at least half the story. And it doesn’t include any elves, nor unicorns, dragons, dwarves or hobbits.

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  • 56

    Interview: Apr, 2001

    Gerhard Hormann

    Can a newcomer to the series read any random book from the series, or does one have to start at book one.

    Robert Jordan

    You absolutely must start at the first book. Someone who simply starts with Winter’s Heart, has no idea what everything is about. I never give explain things again halfway through; you’re expected to know it already. So anyone who have become curious, should start with The Eye of the World. If you don’t like it, it’s still not a waste of money, because I think it’s quite readable as a stand-alone book. And history has shown that everyone who has read that book, starts looking for the next books.

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  • 57

    Interview: Aug 9th, 2008

    Tom Doherty

    In 1984, Jim came to Tom and said, “I’ve got a great idea for an epic fantasy, and it’s going to be 6 books.” Tom says that book one was 5 years late [it came out in 1989]. Tom describes first reading the manuscript for The Eye of the World: “Oh God, I fell in love with it.” He knew it would be the greatest epic fantasy since Tolkien. Tor prepared a marketing campaign unprecedented in those days of 5,000 Advance Reader Copies to send one to every bookstore in the country and a combined hardcover/trade paperback first printing. 40,000 books sold out almost immediately, and when the second book came out, the sales of The Eye of the World shot up again, doubling what it had sold the first time. After that, Tor stopped the trade paperback part of the release and just pushed the hardcover.

    Jim always said he knew the ending of the series, Tom says. And when he was working on A Memory of Light, he wrote the ending. That plus the prologue and the rest of what he wrote totaled 200 manuscript pages [that’s about 50,000 words].

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  • 58

    Interview: Apr 22nd, 2009

    Leigh Butler

    Afterwards we went back to the hotel and I got dressed for the ball. I didn't have a costume, but I had my swirly black skirt and burgundy velvet top, and most importantly I had my crystal necklace and earrings, which are my favorite pieces of expensive jewelry—possibly because they're my only expensive jewelry—and which I was thrilled to get a chance to wear.

    Harriet McDougal Rigney

    The ball was a great deal of fun. The music was provided by The Lost Boys, for whom I can't seem to find a website (I keep getting a certain Joel Schumacher film), in all their kilted glory, which was perfect music for the occasion. There was a silent auction in the back, which was selling, among other things, The Hat, and an original manuscript page from The Eye of the World, which Harriet pointed out contained a most significant edit: Where Ba'alzamon says to Rand in the dream sequence, "At last we meet", Jordan had crossed out "at last" and changed it to "Once more we meet". Think about it. All proceeds, of course, going to charity.

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  • 59

    Interview: Jun 30th, 2010

    Luckers

    On to the books themselves, I was wondering...knowing Jim as well as you did, were there any plot points or developments in the series in which he truly surprised you? If so could you elaborate on one?

    Harriet McDougal Rigney

    Well, in editing The Eye of the World, I asked him something about what would happen once they got to Tar Valon, and he said, "They don't get there in this book, Harriet." He surprised (and delighted) me all the time.

    Luckers

    And were there such surprises (to you) in the layout of the next two books?

    Harriet McDougal Rigney

    Yes there were. RAFO.

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  • 60

    Interview: Jun 10th, 2010

    Luckers

    Why was there a flash of blue when Thom fought the Myrrdraal in The Eye of the World?

    Maria Simons

    To quote Robert Jordan himself, RAFO.

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  • 61

    Interview: Sep 21st, 2010

    Matt Hatch

    (for WSB): The next question is from a Theorylander. Did Ishamael’s healing of Lews Therin back in the prologue of The Eye of the World create the same doctor-patient bond as when Nynaeve healed Egwene?

    Brandon Sanderson

    No, not that I know. I think that I would know, but no.

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  • 62

    Interview: Oct 19th, 2010

    John Ottinger

    Are there any "Easter eggs" that the well-versed Wheel of Time reader might find contained in Towers of Midnight, and can you name at least one?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Oh boy. Well, one person's Easter egg is another person's very obvious thing. In Chapter One, "Apples First," in which a character from The Eye of the World shows up, I intended that to be more of an Easter egg and not tell people who that was. But Harriet asked for a big reminder near the end of the chapter of where the characters had met. So there are things like that, where characters return, but most of the time we have erred on the side of giving a little bit of an extra reminder of who these people are. If you look in Lan's plotline, several characters from New Spring make reappearances. The well-versed Wheel of Time reader is not even going to consider that an Easter egg, since it's going to be pretty obvious to them, but to other people I think it will be surprising. Will there be an Easter egg on the level of The Gathering Storm's reference to Plato? I'm sure that there are a few things like that embedded in there, as Robert Jordan always liked to embed references, but I can't think of any off the top of my head.

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  • 63

    Interview: Apr 17th, 2011

    Terez

    Was Moridin in his own dream when Rand visited him in The Gathering Storm? If so, did he pull the boys into his own dreams in The Eye of the World, or did he invade and control theirs?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I believe Moridin was...okay, in The Gathering Storm, he was in his own dream. He at least believes he was in his own dream, and he is usually right on things like that. And in The Eye of the World, he...I believe it was their dreams that he was controlling. But...

    Terez

    That's difficult to do.

    Brandon Sanderson

    That's very difficult to do....so I could be wrong on that. It's easier to pull someone into your own dreams, but it's easier to influence multiple dreams from the outside. So...does that make sense?

    Terez

    Yes.

    Brandon Sanderson

    So, since he's doing it to all three of them, that makes me believe he was actually controlling their dreams. I'm pretty sure on that one, Terez. [Cut discussion of the pronunciation of Terez.] I could be wrong...but my understanding of the mechanics is that since they're all dreaming the same thing, that it's external, much as a lot of the Forsaken have been not warding their dreams through the early parts of the books, and causing people to dream lots of weird things, and share dreams. Ishamael was doing that intentionally...doing something similar. Does that make sense?

    Terez

    Right, and it also has to do with his ability to find ta'veren.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yeah.

    Footnote—Terez

    In my reread I noticed in A Crown of Swords Chapter 10, "Unseen Eyes", that Egwene says it's possible for a Dreamer to pull someone out of their dreams into a dream of her own making in Tel'aran'rhiod; this is something the Wise Ones won't do, but Ishamael wouldn't have a problem with it; I had forgotten that detail for some reason, and the Moridin dream confused the issue. It can be assumed that Lanfear did the same thing; Moghedien has shown no sign of having the ability (or perhaps the desire) to reach others' dreams, but she can trap Dreamwalkers in their own dreams in Tel'aran'rhiod. Aran'gar can do it weakly, and then only if she is sleeping right next to the person. Brandon has a point about the fact that all three of them dreamed the same dream apparently at once, but in once instance, after Perrin found the wolves, it seemed to Rand and Mat that they fell asleep, had the dream, and immediately woke up, when Moiraine says they were asleep for four hours.

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  • 64

    Interview: Apr 17th, 2011

    Terez

    There seems to be a difference between Ishamael's big black cord and the wires which represent the protection from the taint. Is that intentional?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I believe that it is. But that one's more like 50-50...no, I'm like 65% sure.

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  • 65

    Interview: Jul 11th, 2010

    Stefan

    So we know in The Eye of the World, there was somebody who talked in capital letters like how the Dark One did. Obviously you can't tell us who it was, but will we know by the end of A Memory of Light?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I know what that was about. Will it be in the next book? Er...RAFO. Sorry.

    STEFAN

    Will we know by the end of the series though?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    I really can't say yes or no. This is one of the things Harriet has asked me to be very quiet about.

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  • 66

    Interview: 2001

    Thus Spake the Creator (Paraphrased)

    Question (How did the series originate?)

    To the books then. The Wheel of Time is a fantasy series epic in size and scale. How did it all begin—and what was your inspiration for it?

    Robert Jordan

    It's really hard to say. There's all sorts of things that come about before you start writing a series. You don't have "an idea" that becomes a short story, or a book. A short story is maybe hundreds of ideas that have come together, a novel is thousands of ideas that have come together. But The Wheel of Time—I was thinking at one point about what it'd really be like to be tapped on the shoulder and told "You were born to be the savior of mankind. And oh yes—you're probably going to die in the end and no, you can't resign—it's your job, you're stuck with it".

    Then I had been thinking about the source of myths, the source of legends. About whether some of them might not have been personifications of natural events, the way we say some of them are supposed to be. What if some of them were things that people had done, and had simply been told and told until it became a myth and legend?

    At the same time, I was thinking about the degradation of information over distance. The further you are from an event in either space or time, the less reliable your knowledge of the event. Information inevitably degrades over distance, whether it's spatial or temporal.

    I was thinking about lots of other things too, and it began to coalesce. It was the beginnings of what would become the Wheel of Time. I let it mull over for four or five years, then I thought I was ready to sit down and write. But it took four years to write The Eye of the World because I discovered there were a lot of other things I had to think and sort out.

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  • 67

    Interview: Dec 6th, 2011

    Brandon Sanderson

    For those who do not know, Darrell Sweet—illustrator of all of the Wheel of Time covers—has passed away.

    The first of his covers I can remember seeing was his beautiful cover for The Eye of the World. I'm sure it wasn't actually the first, however. Mr. Sweet was one of the premier fantasy artists for many years in the business. I have a healthy appreciation of what he accomplished, and I'm not sure many new readers realize just how influential and important he was as an illustrator.

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  • 68

    Interview: Dec 6th, 2011

    Brandon Sanderson

    Into these realms, Darrell's artwork was a breath of fresh air. He's beautiful with colors, his creatures are fantastic and fanciful, and he gets across a truly magical and wondrous feel to his art. When Mr. Sweet came along, that's when fantasy illustration started to change. Now, a lot of Wheel of Time fans like to gripe about inaccuracies in the Wheel of Time book covers. They have that luxury because we, as a genre, have seen huge strides in illustration over the last two decades. However, it would be unwise to dismiss the illustrators who—through their majestic use of imagery and color—lifted us up to this point.

    Sir, I picked up The Eye of the World in large part because of your wonderful cover, which is a true masterpiece that I would put up beside any other piece of fantasy art. You gave us beauty, wonder, and magic. You will be missed. Rest in peace.

    Brandon

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  • 69

    Interview: May 19th, 2004

    Robert Jordan

    I then asked, as (plot-wise) the 4th book is clearly different for the three previous ones, if it was planned or if it just happened; he answered that it was planned.

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  • 70

    Interview: Jun 2nd, 2003

    Jason Denzel

    When he was questioned about where a new reader should start reading the series, he replied:

    Robert Jordan

    The expanded New Spring could serve as starting place, certainly, or any of the three short novels once I have them all completed, and some people may see them as easier since they are (will be) thinner books and less complicated, but I still think of [Eye of the World] as the proper starting place. I guess it's really up to where [new readers] want to begin.

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  • 71

    Interview: Dec 5th, 2000

    Robert Jordan

    The next person also asked about the cover art, and he gave a shorter version of the first answer.

    Some one asked about the first printing hardbacks of The Eye of the World and how to identify them. He went on to say that the rumor that some of the early trade paperbacks were re-bound as hardbacks was an urban legend. He said that he checked.

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  • 72

    Interview: Feb 26th, 2012

    Subwoofer (@240)

    ...I gotta be honest, the cover for The Eye of the World was what got me into the books in the first place.

    What really sucks is that I found out that the larger than normal paperback I have been rereading all this time was the first issue for The Eye of the World. I thought there was a hardcover version. So all this time I have been beating the crap out of a rare first edition. Boy do I feel special.... kinda like the time I found out my sister traded all my first run Uncanny X-Mens for my cousin's ... er "collection" of Archie comics.... kinda like the time... gah...

    KAFMERCHANT (@257)

    Hi All,

    Been lurking since The Beginning. Although I haven't had the time or the mental capacity/creativity, most days, to contribute in any significant fashion. Although hopefully I can find some more time in the future to do more than Lurk....

    However, to all the new posters, regulars and alumni—I'm appreciative of the hours and hours of entertainment you've provided; Kudos to all!

    Just a heads up to Sub, that the first printing of the oversize paperback isn't overly valuable (50-150 $) pending condition, and they show up on ebay on a regular basis—but still something worth looking after carefully.

    If I've managed this properly—my avatar will have a picture of what I believe is the first bound version of The Eye of the World that I rescued from ebay a couple of years ago (maybe tnh can/will comment). Read the red fine print, if/when you can ... it's really cool.

    Edited: for coherency. Deleted a sentence as my avatar showed up as planned. And add—you can't see it well in the picture/avatar, but there is printing along the top of book that reads "Harriet's marked up copy"—no trolling. This book contains some hand written edits by Mrs. Jordan (and someone else whom I have yet to identify although there is a fairly obvious choice), and includes a 3-page letter to tnh from Mrs. Jordan. As I understand it, the advance reading copy was created from this version, as were the final hardcover (yes Sub there was a limited hardcover printing) and oversize softcover both originally printed in February 1990.

    JD

    Teresa Nielsen Hayden (@276)

    How the devil did that production copy wind up on eBay? With, for all love, my correspondence with Harriet still tucked inside? (Is that the letter where we were going back and forth about Nancy Weisenfeld's copyedit, and Jim Rigney's preferred style of ellipses? It's been a long time.)

    Did the person who sold it say anything about it?

    I'd love to see large high-resolution photos of all those materials, including samples of the interior markup, and all three pages of the letter. I can recognize the handwriting of most of the people that could have marked up the pages, so there's a good chance that I can either identify the person or rule out some possibilities.

    I'd very much prefer that you mail me pictures of the letter, rather than posting them somewhere. My email address is on the front page of my weblog, Making Light.

    Onward.

    What you have there isn't the first bound edition. It's either a bound galley or a bound manuscript copy—I should remember which, but I don't. Tom Doherty did so much fiddling with the marketing and format of that book that it spent close to a year in production, rather than the normal nine months, and at times drove our department to distraction.

    If it's typeset, it's a bound galley. If it's reproduced from the manuscript pages, it's a bound manuscript. Both can be referred to as "advance copies."

    Anyway, the advance copies with the plain light-blue cover were superseded by the massive printing of ARCs with the four-color Darryl Sweet cover. An ARC (Advance Reading Copy) is basically a bound galley with a four-color cover that's usually an early version of the cover that will appear on the book. The Tor booth at the ABA that year had so many copies of it that they could have built Vauban-style fortifications out of them. Printing such a large and lavish ARC in such quantities was a gamble for Tor, which back then was a smaller and poorer company.

    Is the thing you're referring to as "the first printing of the oversize paperback" the ARC? Check and see whether it has a price printed anywhere on the cover. If not, it's an ARC. IIRC, the ARC also featured the interim state of the cover in which the author of one of the cover quotes was erroneously identified as "Gordon R. R. Dickson."

    KAFMERCHANT (@306)

    Thanks for the info, greatly appreciated!

    I will email pictures in the next 24 hours along with what history I know or have deduced. I agree with you that the letter shouldn't be made public without necessary approvals. The "discussion" you mentioned sounds...interesting...but the contents of this letter are more mundane and simply include info on book formatting, layout and listing of the chapter icons (I've scanned a copy of it too).

    While not clear in my avatar, the book looks grey in real life (although if there was a light blue one, that would be interesting as well). I acquired a second one, without markups, that is identical to that pictured, and it is grey as well.

    I know the ARC well, as at one point I had five of the things from various bundled purchases I made (the exterior cover of the ARC is the same artwork that is now found on the inside flap, and the inside cover of the ARC is the same artwork that now appears on the current cover). I just picked up one of the ARCs and on the back has a quote attributed to George R Dickson—is that what you were referring to? (Been so long since I'd picked it up that I'd completely forgot that I had the matching bookmark, and postcard inside, a pleasant surprise). I've since donated one to Jason Denzel and one to Jennifer Liang, for helping make a waking nightmare of a trip to the Gathering Storm signing in Charleston end on an awesome note.

    In referring to the "oversize paperback"—it is a softcover book with the dimensions of approximately 6" x 9" (matching the size of the arc as well as the other proofs/galleys/bound manuscripts that I have). On this version, the exterior artwork and inside flap match what is currently on shelves everywhere. There are prices (both Canadian and US, etc) and ISBN # listing.

    From your perspective—is there a difference between a galley, bound manuscript, or proof? Just curious, as I have various versions of almost all those written by RJ (have never seen a proof/galley/manuscript for Crown of Swords despite hours and hours of searching).

    Teresa Nielsen Hayden (@311)

    Okay, this is funny. I've been able to confirm that what Kafmerchant has is a one-of-a-kind artifact from the production of the first edition of The Eye of the World. The line written in red ink at the top edge of the cover that says "Harriet's marked-up copy" is in my handwriting.

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  • 73

    Interview: Sep 22nd, 2012

    Loialson

    Was the original intention of the Eye of the World to be a second option to reseal the Bore?

    Brandon Sanderson

    As far as I know, no. Now, that's the sort of thing that could be buried in the notes, but you know, I've read a lot of them, and as far as I know, no, that's not the purpose.

    Loialson

    Did the makers originally have a specific intention? Because I don't think Rand used it in the way they intended.

    Brandon Sanderson

    I believe that they did have a specific intention.

    Loialson

    Did Rand use it alright, to their intentions?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Um, Rand...um...

    Loialson

    That felt like a big waste to me.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yeah. I was...I will RAFO that. But I will say that they did have a specific intention. How about, here's something I can give you...it's actually backing up a few questions. I've mentioned online that we're probably going to—for a certain anthology, the Unfettered anthology—we are going to be putting deleted scenes from A Memory of Light and some of these deleted scenes will answer some of your questions.

    Loialson

    That's exciting. Thank you.

    Brandon Sanderson

    I don't think there's an official announcement; I don't think Harriet has decided 100% to make the announcement, but I've mentioned online before in things that we were considering it, and so, some deleted scenes having to do with some of your questions are actually going to be in this Unfettered anthology, and they may be from the viewpoint of a certain Forsaken that everyone's very curious about.

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  • 74

    Interview: Jan 7th, 2013

    Ed Huyck

    When did you first start reading The Wheel of Time, and what were your initial impressions of the stories and the writing?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I still remember the first time I saw The Eye of the World on bookshelves, at age 15. I can almost feel that moment, standing and holding the book in my hands. I think the cover of Eye is the best [longtime series cover artist] Darryl Sweet has ever done—one of the best in fantasy. I loved the cover. The feel of the troop marching along, Lan and Moiraine proud and face forward. The cover screamed epic. I bought the book and loved it.

    I still think Eye is one of the greatest fantasy books ever written. It signifies an era, the culmination of the epic quest genre which had been brewing since Tolkien initiated it in the '60s. The Wheel of Time dominated my reading during the '90s, influencing heavily my first few attempts at my own fantasy novels. I think it did that to pretty much all of us; even many of the most literarily snobbish of fantasy readers were youths when I was, and read The Eye of the World when I did.

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  • 75

    Interview: Jan 12th, 2013

    Question

    What happened to the fourth boy from the Two Rivers?

    Harriet McDougal

    Jim originally had good plans for him later on, but when convinced to eliminate him, he realized how easy it was to kill off that story line.

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  • 76

    Interview: Feb 21st, 1990

    Terez

    This press release was obtained and graciously provided by "kafmerchant", a Wheel of Time collector.

    kafmerchant

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  • 77

    Interview: Feb 21st, 1990

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                                        Contact:  Eleanor Lang
    Publication date:  February 21, 1990



    THE EYE OF
    THE WORLD



    ADVANCE PRAISE FOR THE EYE OF THE WORLD

    "This intricate allegorical fantasy recalls the works of Tolkien because of its intensity and warmth."

                                                               --Publishers Weekly



    THE EYE OF THE WORLD (A Tor book distributed by St. Martin's Press/February 21, 1990/$12.95, trade paperback) is a powerful saga of fantasy that focuses on the age-old conflict between good and evil.  Author Robert Jordan has created a world so exceptional and magical, with characters and settings so voluminous, readers will feel that they are part of the tale, becoming caught up in the villagers [sic] fear of the hideous Trollocs.  Once thought to be mythical, the Trollocs are carnivorous monsters set out to destroy the villagers and -- perhaps even the entire world.  The only one to be trusted is Moiraine, a powerful witch whom all have misgivings about.  It is she who reveals the only plan of redemption -- a plan that will involve the lives of three very different young men, only one who is destined to be the hero.  THE EYE OF THE WORLD is the first volume in what is sure to be an important new series.



    ABOUT THE AUTHOR
    Robert Jordan is a graduate of the Citadel and served in Vietnam.  Before becoming a writer he was a physicist and nuclear engineer.  He lives in Charleston, South Carolina.

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  • 78

    Interview: Jan 8th, 2013

    Question ()

    What about the main character that was removed from The Eye of the World?

    Harriet McDougal

    He didn't do anything until book 4. So he got cut.

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  • 79

    Interview: Jan 10th, 2013

    Question

    What is your best or maybe most important memory to you through the entire process of working the books?

    Harriet McDougal

    Well, I'll never forget when my husband handed to me the first section of The Eye of the World—it was about a third of the book—and it knocked me off my perch. And I'll tell you, I called Tom Doherty, and said, "Tom, you'll have to read this one," and he said, "Why?" [laughter] When he founded Tor, he said he wanted a company where he could always read everything that he published, and Jim said, "It's not going to be long before he said, 'I want to read all the "read" books that I publish.' " And he had been—at that point, Robert Jordan had been writing Conan the Barbarian, which were not significant record-breaking novels. They were very good, but they were what we call midlist. [?] I said because either after—I've forgotten what it was; seven years of marriage?—"Either after seven years of marriage, I have fallen into the 'wife trap' and can't tell whether it's good or not, just cause I've married Jordan—and either that, or this thing is wonderful. That's why."

    And so, he did read it, and I started—he was my working [?] publish it, but he did support the book. And as it went on, he was giving it to me in [?], and at one point I said to him, "Now, when we get to Tar Valon...." He said, "We don't get there in this book." [laughter] I said, "Okay." And then, when they go to Rhuidean—that surpassed the beginning....[?]....just absolutely gorgeous, gorgeous writing. So that was high. And in one of the books—and I've honestly forgotten which one it was—I said, "Honey, this is a boring section. You've got talking heads, talking heads, talking heads. Can't something happen?" So somebody gets killed. [laughter]

    Footnote

    Harriet has told this story before here.

    Brandon Sanderson

    And you know, Tom once told me—this is the guy who founded Tor, Tom Doherty, and it was his company all through the 80s—he once told me he sold the company in order to get the capital after reading The Eye of the World, that he thought, "I need money to promote this book, to make it a best seller." And that was one of the main things, he said, that convinced him to sell the company.

    Harriet McDougal

    I never knew that. That's a hell of a story. Anyway, he did do a splendid job in publishing it. There used to be something called the American Booksellers' Association, and there was a huge convention in the spring. He had gone to Dallas to hand out previews to booksellers, which was common in those days, but what was not common in those days is that he had done a double, full-color cover on the book. Nobody did that—they had those gray covers, with plain type—and that startled all of them. It just really did; he just did what he does better than anybody else, and he did it with The Eye of the World. He was just a wonderful publisher all through the series.

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  • 80

    Interview: Jan 4th, 2013

    Petra Mayer

    What was your first encounter? Did he read you a little bit of it? Did he show you a manuscript?

    Harriet McDougal

    He showed me the first half of The Eye of the World, and I read it. (laughs) You'll love this—as I was reading it, I said, "Well, when they get to Tar Valon . . ." He said, "They don't get there in this book, Harriet." And I just looked at him. (laughs) But by that time, I had called Tom Doherty. I was at that point editorial director of Tor Books, and Tom was the publisher and founder. I said, "You've got to read this one." He said, "Yeah, why?" I said, "Because either after eight years of marriage, I've fallen into the 'wife trap,' or this book is absolutely wonderful." So he did read it, and the second half came toddling along, and Tom did a wonderful job of publishing it. Really, when we talk about 'going the whole hog,' well, Tom Doherty went the whole hog and all the piglets to launch the series. And the rest, I guess you'd say, is history.

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  • 81

    Interview: Jan 4th, 2013

    Petra Mayer

    So what was your role? I know you picked the chapter titles, but describe for our listeners your role in sort of the creation and editing of the series.

    Harriet McDougal

    Well, in The Eye of the World in particular, in the beginning there were four boys leaving the village, but one of them didn't have anything to do. And my husband said, "Well, I had plans for him for the fourth book." And I said, “If you bore people, then there never will be a fourth book. Cut that boring kid out.” So he did.

    Petra Mayer

    Yeah. There are only three, in the final.

    Harriet McDougal

    Yes, that's right. The original cover art—the kind of brownish cover art that was on the inside cover—does show four, which is rather ghostly.

    And another thing . . . Nynaeve . . . I helped him develop her by saying, "Why on earth is she always riding up there to talk to Moiraine? She doesn't seem to have anything to talk about." And I said, "Maybe she's trying to show her that she knows her way around herbal remedies." So a major piece of Nynaeve's character slid into place with that.

    Petra Mayer

    Oh, that she was the Healer and the Wisdom.

    Harriet McDougal

    Yes, the village Wisdom—for people who haven't read the books, we're getting into some detail—but you might be interested that the village the main characters come from has a mayor and a Council, who are all men. But the village Wisdom (laughs) is the wise woman of the village, and generally represents the power of women. It's a very egalitarian world as far as gender is concerned.

    Petra Mayer

    I did notice that, yeah.

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  • 82

    Interview: Feb 1st, 2013

    Question

    Androl is like your character, so as far as that, how much of that was kinda fought by the rest of Team Jordan as far as his gateway talent and stuff?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Let me start by saying that if they hadn't been happy, it wouldn't be in the book. But anything where you work with an editorial team, you'd show them a scene, and they may say that's great, or they may say that it doesn't feel right or wouldn't be a good fit for the story. And sometimes you'll say "I'll change it" or "let me finish this draft, and we'll see what it looks like at the end". As far as the gateways, I felt it wouldn't be realistic otherwise. I've wanted to do with gateways since I was a kid, doing things like I showed in the book. If I had them, what would I do with them? I asked this when I was a kid, so there was a lot that I wanted to do with gateways that were in my own notes that I wanted to do that I couldn't do in my own books, so I stayed away from things that the Wheel of Time had done. So when I got to write WoT I broke out those files. The gloves were off; it was time to do things that I wanted to do but didn't want to rip off the Wheel of Time. At the end of the day, I convinced them to do it. They kept saying "they're all over the place!" so I said "if you could use them, you'd use them a lot". I didn't intend it to be a shout out of any kind, it's things I've wanted to do with gateways for like 15 years. It wasn't a shout out to the fandom. It's been an interesting experience. A lot of people think that I just wrote what the fans thought, but it's things that I felt the characters and the world would do, and if the fans happened to have talked about it, it's because it's what I thought would happen. In fact, as I wrote the books, I read very little of the fandom in order to prevent those exact thoughts from taking root.

    Chris W

    During and after the signing, we had the discussion with Brandon about Dannil Lewin. Originally, Dannil had actually gone with Rand, Perrin, and Mat from the Two Rivers on their journey, and played a major role in events of book 3 or 4. In the end, Harriet convinced RJ that it may be better without Dannil, so some of Dannil's comments in A Memory of Light are a shout out to that of sorts. Just a fun story I thought you all might find interesting.

    Footnote

    Dannil is on the inside cover of The Eye of the World.

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  • 83

    Interview: Apr, 2003

    Galgóczi Móni

    Let's assume that you are reading your first novel right now, for the first time. Would you be satisfied, or would you make changes?

    Robert Jordan

    The first book was published thirteen years ago. As far as the story is concerned, I am perfectly happy with it; it is likely the same story that I would write now. But I have problems with the prose now, because now I can write a lot better. Otherwise, if there were no deadlines, I would probably rewrite the same book over and over.

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  • 84

    Interview: Feb 11th, 2013

    Question

    With the changeover from the young adult and the adult version, how much do you have to cut out for you to [say it's] appropriate for young children?

    Harriet McDougal

    None. What was done was that there was a forward, I guess you'd say, or a prologue written by my husband for the first volume of The Eye of the World in the YA version.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yeah, but they didn't actually cut anything out; they just split the books into smaller volumes to entice the young readers into reading them. (laughter)

    Harriet McDougal

    That's right. And they got bigger type.

    Footnote

    The split version of The Eye of the World consists of From the Two Rivers and To the Blight. The extra prologue is called "Ravens"; it's an Egwene POV from when she was a child.

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  • 85

    Interview: Feb 7th, 2013

    DomaniSway

    When editing both Robert Jordan and Brandon Sanderson, were there any scenes that needed to be cut because they were "too ridiculous"?

    Harriet McDougal

    No, for either of them. They are fabulous storytellers and did not show her ridiculous scenes. One scene of Brandon's she cut for pacing reasons. She did have some disagreements with Robert Jordan, different opinions. Some scenes that he absolutely loved, she did not like, and vice versa. She emphasized the importance of having your editor as a trusted first reader.

    Brandon mentions Dannil, the fourth Two Rivers boy, and Harriet explains that he was cut because he had nothing to do in The Eye of the World and he was boring. Robert Jordan said that he had big plans for him in the fourth book, and Harriet's response was that if you bore your readers now, there won't be a fourth book. Later, Robert Jordan admitted "how easily he [Dannil] unzipped out of the book."

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  • 86

    Interview: Mar 18th, 2013

    Tom Doherty

    I like the Fallon books. I like the Conans he wrote. But when I read The Eye of the World, I just thought, boy, this is just wonderful. This is special.

    Harriet McDougal

    Yeah.

    Tom Doherty

    Harriet and I decided we were going to make this a bestseller. We did it in trade paper because we were afraid we couldn't get enough out of a fat hardcover book. Trade paper wasn't anywhere near as big then as it is now, but we thought that's good, too, because it will call attention to itself. It'll be different. So we did it in trade paper and sold 40,000 copies, which was huge for trade paper in those days, for the first of a fantasy series.

    Harriet McDougal

    When I called you the first time, I was about halfway through reading the partials Jim was handing me. I said: "Tom, you've got to read this one." He said: "Yeah, why?" [To Irene Gallo] You know Tom. I replied: "Because either I've fallen into the wife trap after seven years of marriage, or this book is wonderful." I sent it to Tom, and you didn't just go the whole hog, you did the whole hog and all the piglets. A truly magnificent job of publishing.

    Tom Doherty

    Oh, we had so much fun with that. You know, it's funny. People think that, when you get a success like that, you don't want to mess with it. The second book doubled the sales of the first in trade paper. So when we got to the third book, we decided to do it in hardcover, and sales just screamed. People asked: "Why would you do that? Look how wonderfully it's growing where it is." And that was our first book to hit the bestseller list.

    Irene Gallo

    Really?

    Tom Doherty

    Yeah, it hit the New York Times, not high up, but it did. And from then on, always up. How about you, Irene? You've been working on the covers for a lot of years.

    Irene Gallo

    It's hard to say. I came on in '93, when Maria [Mellili, former Art Director for Tor Books] was here. It was already the big book of the year. Many of the cover decisions were set. My earliest memories were that the production schedules were set by hours, not days.

    Harriet McDougal

    Really?

    Irene Gallo

    There would always be four different versions of the production schedule, based on what day it came in. Contingency plans on top of contingency plans.

    Harriet McDougal

    For one of the books, Jim and I stayed at the Murray Hill Hotel, with twin laptops. He'd do a chapter and give it to me, I'd read and edit it, and then I'd bring a disk in. I had a terrific carryall I'd bought at the Morgan Library, but it was not up to carrying my laptop and gave up the ghost in the middle. That was, I think, the craziest.

    Irene Gallo

    I remember Jeff Dreyfus, our production manager at the time, spent the days walking back and forth from the office to the hotel.

    Harriet McDougal

    And Jim ended up having to stay up here to proofread. It was going to take a week or more, and I had to go back and deal with stuff at home. That's funny about the production schedules by hour, though. I'd never heard that.

    Irene Gallo

    They would set up four of them: if it comes on Monday, it's this, but if it comes in late Tuesday, it's this.

    Tom Doherty

    But hey, you know, it worked. We did a book each year, and each book built. By the time we got to the fourth book, we were selling the first book in mass market paperback. It was hooking people and bringing them in. Then the next book would grow, because people wouldn't want to wait.

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  • 87

    Interview: Mar 18th, 2013

    Harriet McDougal

    I get a lot of questions about Dannil, the character who was cut out of The Eye of the World. Dannil sort of figures in that cover painting. [Referring to a painting of an Eye of the World poster in Tom Doherty's office.] There's an extra character in there. He has a ghostly life.

    Tom Doherty

    Darrell Sweet was doing many of the biggest fantasies in the 1990's.

    Harriet McDougal

    Yes, using his work was a big expense for a little company. It was one of the ways in which you did such a superb job of publishing. Also, what's so nice about the gorgeous Michael Whelan cover for the last book is that it's obviously a Michael Whelan, but he very tactfully made it so that when you rack them all out, they look like family. That was a lovely thing he did.

    Irene Gallo

    It is. He did a good job. The palette and compostion really works with the other covers. I didn't envy him the job and he turned it into a nice tribute as well as a conclusion.

    Harriet McDougal

    And Sam Weber is so nice. I keep trying to call him Sam Weller because of Dickens. He said Whelan called him once and asked: "What's a ter'angreal?"

    Looking at The Way of Kings, I had an extraordinary coincidence. A friend of mine's former wife is a curator at the Phillips Collection in Washington. She's a descendent of John Martin, an English painter also known as Mad Martin. He was the highest paid artist in Great Britain in the 1840's, and then he sank into total obscurity until a couple of war refugees rediscovered and resurrected his works after World War II. One of his paintings is the cover of The Way of Kings, except that there's a big pantheon where the guy is in the distance.

    Irene Gallo

    I'm going to look that up.

    Harriet McDougal

    His skies are very much like Michael Whelan's. He was doing all that stuff way back then. I don't know if Whelan's ever looked at him, but it looks as if he has. Those fabulous skies of Whelan's.

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  • 88

    Interview: Apr, 2013

    Question

    One that I can't ever get an answer on: How did Thom know Padan Fain? In The Eye of the World, he says he recognized Fain and he scornfully says Fain "is always one to carry bad news quickly, and the worse, the faster. There’s more raven in him than man." This implies more than a passing knowledge of the man.

    Maria Simons

    Both Padan Fain and Thom Merrilin made their livings by traveling from one small village to another in a reasonably small area. They had simply been in the same village at the same time on multiple occasions. Add to that Thom's proclivity for collecting information, and you have a very simple explanation.

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  • 89

    Interview: Apr, 2013

    Question

    What was the Ring of Tamyrlin—could it have been the twisted stone ter’angreal?

    Maria Simons

    The Ring of Tamyrlin was defined in the expanded glossary included in To the Blight (the second half of The Eye of the World repacked for YA readers); it was a legendary ring, believed mythical by most people, worn by the leader of the Aes Sedai during the Age of Legends. Stories about the Ring of Tamyrlin include that it was an angreal or sa’angreal or ter’angreal of immense power. It supposedly was named after the first person to learn how to tap into the Source and channel the One Power, and in some tales, was actually made by that man or woman. It was definitely not the twisted stone ter’angreal.

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  • 90

    Interview: Apr 20th, 2013

    Terez

    Why does Mordeth suddenly fall back in the room under Shadar Logoth (in The Eye of the World)? Was it because Mat picked up the dagger, or was it something different?

    Maria Simons

    I don't know.

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  • 91

    Interview: Apr 20th, 2013

    Terez

    Brandon has said that Rand killed Aginor. (It was also in the BWB.) I think he was kind of iffy on it, but I tended to think that Rand killed him; some people say that Aginor overdosed, but I always thought that it was Rand taking the Power of the Eye from him that killed him, you know? It's like the shock of having it taken away...do you know?

    Maria Simons

    I don't know. I always thought it was Rand too, but I don't know.

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  • 92

    Interview: Apr 20th, 2013

    Terez

    The thick black cord that was attached to Ishamael at the Eye of the World (technically it was at Shayol Ghul or in Dreamland) that Rand saw...is that different from the black wires?

    Maria Simons

    I don't know.

    Terez

    I asked Brandon about that one too.

    Maria Simons

    I would have to really look at it and check the notes; it's not something that I know right off the top....

    Terez

    It's described a little bit differently. I thought maybe one was a connection to the True Power, and the other was protection from the taint, but RJ couldn't decide if that was the same thing or not.

    Maria Simons

    I recently saw something about that in the notes, but I'm not remembering exactly what it said.

    Terez

    Do you happen to know anything about Ishamael's plan with the Eye, because it seems like he was trying to lead them there; why did he keep mentioning the Eye? Did he have a dream about it or something? You don't know?

    Maria Simons

    No.

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  • 93

    Interview: Apr 20th, 2013

    Terez

    RJ said that Fain was responsible for the fly trap thing; it's in The Great Hunt, in that little village...

    Maria Simons

    He did?

    Terez

    Yeah. Because a lot of people thought it was Lanfear, and RJ said it was Fain.

    Maria Simons

    *looks surprised*

    Terez

    So I guess you don't know the answer to that question. (repeats self) ...and that kind of blew everyone's theories out of the water...

    Maria Simons

    Yeah, because I thought it was Lanfear.

    Footnote

    It's possible Maria is right that it's Lanfear; we only have paraphrased reports of RJ saying it was Fain: two reports from the same signing in 2005 that might actually be written by the same person.

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  • 94

    Interview: Apr 20th, 2013

    Terez

    In The Dragon Reborn, Perrin sees Ishamael, Rahvin, and Be'lal in a place that looks like the Ways—and of course we see that place in The Eye of the World, in the boys' dreams too—is that a construct that Ishamael makes in Tel'aran'rhiod?

    Maria Simons

    I am assuming so, but again, I don't know.

    Terez

    I got the impression (because of this conversation) that Brandon kinda tried to explain that one.

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  • 95

    Interview: Nov 6th, 2012

    Question

    In the prologue it sounds like Lews Therin balefires himself, and then is reborn as Rand al’Thor.

    Brandon Sanderson

    He does not balefire himself, so I can answer that. He does not.

    QUESTION

    So it’s just something that sounds a lot like balefire?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Yes- well there’s various interpretations of what happens there. He um- yeah there’s various interpretations of what actually killed him. If you go look and read closely, what actually killed him may be- could be subject to some debate.

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  • 96

    Interview: Apr 4th, 2013

    Brandon Sanderson

    Irene at Tor also sent me this beautiful poster (the scale may not be obvious in the photo, but the frame is about 22" by 30") with a long quote from chapter 4 of The Eye of the World. Robert Jordan truly was a master at making a story come alive before our eyes.

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  • 97

    Interview: Feb 13th, 2013

    Question

    So, at the end of The Eye of the World, the all caps voice? Will we ever find out who it was, or what they were looking for?

    Brandon Sanderson

    The all caps voice at the end of Eye of the World makes an appearance in A Memory of Light.

    Question

    What about what wasn't there?

    Brandon Sanderson

    What's that?

    Question

    What about what wasn't there?

    Brandon Sanderson

    What do you mean, what wasn't there?

    Harriet McDougal

    [laughter]

    Brandon Sanderson

    Maybe it'll be in the encyclopedia. I can still RAFO things, Harriet is working on an encyclopedia of The Wheel of Time, which is coming out maybe in two years or so.

    Harriet McDougal

    Yeah.

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  • 98

    Interview: Aug 21st, 2013

    Brandon Sanderson

    I remember those little half books of The Eye of the World. I was already a fan by then, but those became collectors' items among the fans.

    Tom Doherty

    We gave away over a million of them. I figured anybody who read that couldn't stop.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Wow. A million of them? Really. That's a lot.

    Tom Doherty

    It was. It wasn't quite half of the novel. It was a natural break that Harriet agreed on.

    Brandon Sanderson

    It was Shadar Logoth, I seem to recall. Wow. A million. That's crazy. I mean, most authors don't have a million books in print, and Robert Jordan had a million of his promo books in print. That's just crazy. You did that right around the third book, wasn't it?

    Tom Doherty

    Yeah. The first book sold 40,000 trade paperbacks. We launched it as a trade paperback, because not many people were doing major promotions on trade paperbacks in those days. We ended up selling 40,000 of the trade.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Which is really good.

    Tom Doherty

    Which was very good, yeah. I had the hardest time with the sales force when, on the third book, I wanted to make the major promotion in hardcover. They said, "Well, you've got such a winner. Why would you want to change?"

    Brandon Sanderson

    See, as a reader, when I picked up The Eye of the World, I picked it up in mass market paperback. My bookstore first got it in mass market. I was just a new reader, and all the books that I had read up to that point had been series in progress that people handed to me, like David Eddings. Fantastic stuff, particularly for a teen boy. And Tad Williams, and Terry Brooks. I found the Dragonriders on my own and loved those, but it was already done. I was on the lookout for something to discover then. I didn't want to always just be handed something that everyone else loves. "Where's my series?"

    When I saw The Eye of the World, I was on the lookout for big, thick books, because you got more bang for your buck. As a kid who didn't have a lot of pocket change, that was an important thing. So I bought The Eye of the World, and I read it, and I said, "There's something really special here. I think this is going to be mine."

    Then my bookstore got the second one in trade paperback, and I said, "A‑ha! I've spotted it!" Because as a kid, that told me that this book was popular enough that my little bookstore was willing to order in the trade paperback. Then, when the third one came out in hardcover, I thought "He's made it, and I called it." I was like the Wheel of Time hipster, right? "From the get‑go, this is my series and I found it, and all you other people didn't see it in the beginning." Even still, I'll go on signings and ask, "Who picked it up in 1990?" and we'll get a cheer for those of us who waited 23 years for the series to end.

    Tom Doherty

    That's great.

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  • 99

    Interview: Aug 21st, 2013

    Brandon Sanderson

    So after Ender's Game, the second Tor book that I can remember reading was The Eye of the World and the other Wheel of Time books. There were all these rumors out there about how many books it was planned to be and what it was originally pitched as. Tom, I think we need to hear it from your mouth: the first-hand witness of that pitch when James Rigney came in. Was it this office right here?

    Tom Doherty

    Well, actually we'd already done three books with him. The Fallon Blood, The Fallon Pride, and The Fallon Legacy. He did them under a different pen name.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Right. Reagan O'Neal.

    Tom Doherty

    They had started out to be one book. He was going to do a big historical novel of the American Revolution, but it ended up being three fat books.

    When he came in and said he wanted to do a big epic fantasy novel, we said, "Well, a big epic fantasy?" He said, "Well, maybe it'll be a trilogy." So I suggested a six book contract, and when he said no I said "Okay, you know if you finish it in three, we'll just do a different trilogy." He said, "Well, all right, if you insist."

    Brandon Sanderson

    Didn't you tell me that, when he gave the pitch on the first book, it really ended where the third book now ends, with the sword that's not a sword being taken from the stone that's not a stone?

    Tom Doherty

    Well, he didn't actually, no. He didn't give me a very detailed outline, but I didn't really need one because he'd done such a great job with the Fallon trilogy and Harriet [McDougal, Robert Jordan's widow and editor] was sold on it. Harriet had edited the Fallon trilogy.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Right. She tells the story that she called you after reading the few chapters of The Eye of the World that she'd read and said, "You need to look into this thing, because either I've fallen into the wife trap after all these years, or this is the best thing I've ever read." [Note: Harriet McDougal told the same story during her conversation with Tom Doherty.]

    Tom Doherty

    I don't remember her saying that, but she did call me and say, "Hey, this is special." And I read it, and it was special. We did some things with those books that were pretty major for a small, independent company.

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  • 100

    Interview: 1984

    Robert Jordan

    Rand al'Thor is, he believes, the son of the widowed farmer and sheepherder, Tam al'Thor, with whom he lives outside a small village, Emond's Field. The village lies in an area bounded on the west by the Mountains of Mist, on the south by the White River [So called because it is full of rapids. Ii {sic} is also broad. In ancient tongue it was called, as still is to the east, Etheralell, waters of the Mountain Home] and on the north by the River Taren. [NOTE: The stream which flows away from Emond's Field, on which the mill stands below the village, is called the Winespring Water. It comes from a spring called Winespring (in the village, in the center of the village green, with a footbridge), the waters of which are so cool and sweet and refreshing as to be as intoxicating as wine.] These two rivers join about fifty miles east of Emond's Field. Emond's Field is isolated from the world, by custom as well as by geography, as are the neighboring villages. Few people leave the district, and fewer still of those return once gone. The area is called by locals Two Rivers, and contains four villages: Emond's Field, Roundhill, Parry Coomb, and Taren Ferry (the smallest).

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  • 101

    Interview: 1984

    Robert Jordan

    NOTE: Moiraine and Lan seem interested in the village and the area, and in all the gossip and talk of the area. They are both very interested in the rumors of the hooded riders, though they try to hide it.

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  • 102

    Interview: 1984

    Robert Jordan

    The story begins early in the morning, practically at first light, with Rand and Tam on their way to Emond's Field with two casks of Tam's pear brandy in their cart, and eight casks of his apple cider, good and hard after winter storing. These are to be delivered to the village tavern, for use during Spring Festival. Tam carries a spear and Rand his bow because there have been several recent attacks on men by wolves, bears and even boars. Rand sees a strange rider, seemingly a man in a hooded black cloak. He sees the rider at a distance, on the edge of some trees, but when he draws Tam's attention to him the rider has disappeared. Tam thinks it was imagination, but something about the figure disturbs Rand, a feel of ill intent and a sense that the rider was staring at him. .

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  • 103

    Interview: 1984

    Robert Jordan

    In Emond's Field we meet some of the village people. Nyneve Bayal, the Wisdom. Owyn al'Vere, the Mayor and tavernkeeper. Eguene, daughter of Owyn al'Vere and the girl Rand hopes to marry one day, though he isn't entirely sure how quickly he wants that day to come. Some of the village and farm boys with whom Rand is friends.

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  • 104

    Interview: 1984

    Robert Jordan

    The villages are all preparing for Spring Festival. The festive mood is occasionally somewhat forced, for all that the people of the district love any chance to have a feast or celebration or party, because there are indications that this Spring Festival may not be so joyous as is hoped. An unusually harsh winter hung on longer than anyone can remember happening before, and though it is two months into what should be Spring the air is still cold. The spring rains are late, foliage is slow appearing on the trees, and the winds out of the Mountains of Mist carry a chill as if they would rather carry snows. On the farms many of the spring lambs are still-born. Wolves, bears and even wild boars plague the region. Some say they have only been driven from the mountains by the harsh winter, but others pronounce ominously that it is as if they were bent on destroying all men between the rivers. Some have even come into the villages themselves, a thing unheard of. Too, there are rumors of strange, hooded men seen in the district, garbed in black, watching yet avoiding all contact with the people of the region, but these are largely ignored because it is believed they were begun by a sour old man who is always predicting disaster. Rand is, of course, among the few who do not dismiss this last. In any case, the village is determined, if almost grimly at times, to forget their troubles with the Festival.

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  • 105

    Interview: 1984

    Robert Jordan

    Everyone in Emond's Field is hoping that despite everything it will be a grand Festival this year. A gleeman [Thom Merilyn] has been brought in from Baerlan, and a peddler [Eward White, though he is somewhat reluctnt {sic} to give his surname], only the second of the new year, is in the village with a high-wheeled wagon pulled by four horses, a larger equippage [sic] than is usual.

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  • 106

    Interview: 1984

    Robert Jordan

    Also, there is an even greater oddity: travelers, a man and a woman. She goes veiled, and is dressed more richly (though not ornately) than anyone remembers seeing in Emond's Field before. He wears scale armor and carries a pair of swords (one long and one short), plus a third, longest of all, tied to his saddle. They arrive on the day of the beginning, causing great wonder, for the road from Emond's Field south leads only to Parry Coomb. They give no reason for their arrival, nor do they say how long they will stay. The woman's name is Moiraine, and the man is called Lan.

    Nyneve is suspicious of them, but they offer to pay in gold, and that is reason enough in Owyn al'Vere's mind to allow them to stay. It is not that he is greedy, but few people come to rent rooms at the tavern. He sees no harm in them. He is a friendly man, always ready to see the best in anyone and often able to bring it out, even from those others thought had no good qualities at all. This is one of the reasons he was chosen Mayor.

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  • 107

    Interview: 1984

    Robert Jordan

    All of the boys are fascinated by the strange man, but there is some argument among them considering him. They have seen armed men before, guards for the grain and wool buyers, but there is something different about this man. Someone suggests he is one of the supposed hooded men, but this is quickly laughed aaside [sic], for only Rand among them believes in the men. Some think he is a Warder, but all of the stories (the only way that any of them knows of Warders) places [sic] these fabulous warriors in the Northern Blight, or occasionally one of the other Blights, where they battle strange and deadly beasts and the evil of the Dark One. Besides, this man's weapons and armor are plain and well worn, while the Warders in the stories always have arms and armor decorated with gold and jewels.

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  • 108

    Interview: 1984

    Robert Jordan

    One of the boys says his father says Warders are just stories for children, and the Blights and the Dark One are just tales to frighten fools. Some of the other boys begin to taunt this one. Rand feels a mounting anxiety, and some of the other boys seem to as well, but the first lad is finally taunted into actually saying Sha'tan's name. All of them, even the boy who said he didn't believe, feel a chill, as if things have gone further than they thought they would. Nyneve overhears the last part of this and is furious, reminding them that the Dark One can hear his name, that calling to him could bring him into the world again. Do they want to bring back the Time of Madness? The boys are all abashed.

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