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JSUCamel
07-08-2009, 09:04 AM
http://money.cnn.com/2009/07/08/technology/google_chrome/index.htm?postversion=2009070807

NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) -- Google Inc. is planning to hit Microsoft Corp. where it hurts by challenging the software giant's dominance in the world of computer operating systems.

The search firm said late Tuesday that it will begin offering its own operating system, called Chrome, in the second half of 2010.

While Google (GOOG, Fortune 500) already offers a host of products that compete with Microsoft (MSFT, Fortune 500), the new operating system is a direct challenge to Microsoft Windows, which is the most widely used operating system in the world.

"Google really can challenge Microsoft, because the proliferation of Web-based applications makes the operating system much less important," said Zeus Kerravala, analyst at Yankee Group. "As we pave the way towards real Web 2.0, there will be less of a real tie-in to Windows."

The new system will initially be targeted at netbooks, the company said. Netbooks are small, inexpensive laptop computers used mostly for Internet access.

Google said the new operating system will make use of open source programming, which allows third-party developers to design compatible add-ons. (Think of the applications created for the iPhone or Facebook.)

Many netbooks currently run a version of Linux, or Microsoft's old operating system, Windows XP. Microsoft has said its current Vista operating system is too big to run on the scaled-down laptops, but it said netbooks will be able to run its Windows 7 OS, set to debut in late October.

But Google thinks computers need a new operating system solution.

"We hear a lot from our users, and their message is clear: computers need to get better," Google said in a statement. Chrome is "our attempt to re-think what operating systems should be."

The new operating system comes after Google launched its Chrome Internet browser late last year.


Cool. The big question is whether Windows applications will be runnable on Chrome. That's a huge reason why I haven't switched to Linux or whatever.

Brita
07-08-2009, 09:11 AM
Ya, that is the catch. But you would think Google would have to account for that.

Microsoft OS are cumbersome and memory monsters. I would be very happy to have a viable alternative.

Neilbert
07-08-2009, 09:16 AM
Cool. The big question is whether Windows applications will be runnable on Chrome. That's a huge reason why I haven't switched to Linux or whatever.

I tried to switch to Linux and it taught me that switching to Linux on a laptop is far more complicated than switching to Linux on a desktop. :(

From what I've seen of Google's programing, and what I've seen of Microsofts, I would expect Google to be a decent alternative. The only thing that bothers me about this is that Google getting a large chunk of the OS market would be giving them a whole lot of computer power.

Fortunately for now their entire business plan seems to be "get people using the internet to increase internet ad revenues".

JSUCamel
07-08-2009, 09:24 AM
I tried to switch to Linux and it taught me that switching to Linux on a laptop is far more complicated than switching to Linux on a desktop. :(

From what I've seen of Google's programing, and what I've seen of Microsofts, I would expect Google to be a decent alternative. The only thing that bothers me about this is that Google getting a large chunk of the OS market would be giving them a whole lot of computer power.

Fortunately for now their entire business plan seems to be "get people using the internet to increase internet ad revenues".

I've used Linux a lot in the past, but the primary problem is that I spend more time trying to figure out how to do what I used to do in Windows on Linux than I do actually doing what I wanted to do in the first place, which gets very frustrating very fast. And then you have software that just isn't made for Linux and so you have to install Windows on the system anyway using a virtual machine, and then.. why bother, right?

I totally love the idea of Linux and everything that it does, but it's so impractical for everyday use that I can't bring myself to completely switch over. I'm waiting for the day when a job requires that I use Linux and I learn how to do everything I want to do on that machine, and then once I figure out all that, I could more easily switch on my home machine. But for now, I'm stuck with Windows because there aren't any real viable, feasible, easy-to-use alternatives. Besides Mac, and I love my Macbook, but it has some of the same limitations.

John Snow
07-08-2009, 10:20 AM
I've used a lot of OSs, from DOS and CP-M through VSM on Vaxen, and Unix - can't say I'm a big Unix fan, way too geeky for me - that said, there're a couple of essential apps I use that originated on unix - R being the one that leaps to mind immediately (it's a statistical package, essentially free S+)...and unix ports to windows seem to generally turn out ok. I wouldn't mind seeing alittle more competition in the operating system world though, and Google are (maybe - remember their i-Phone competitor?) the folks who can do it.

Gilshalos Sedai
07-08-2009, 10:21 AM
Basically, Windows is going to end up being the equivalent of the horse's ass. Roads are designed the way they are (and the things that use roads) because the original roads were designed to fit two horses' butts side-by-side while pulling a charriot. We're so well-trained to use the interfaces on Windows, that any other program is going to have to imitate that to a certain extent.

123seem
07-08-2009, 10:23 AM
is that the same google chrome that i can get as a web browser free?
:confused:

JSUCamel
07-08-2009, 10:27 AM
is that the same google chrome that i can get as a web browser free?
:confused:

Same company, but different software. The OS will be called Chrome (or Chrome OS). The browser is also called Chrome (but will likely be changed to Chrome Browser or Chrome Web or something).

Neilbert
07-09-2009, 02:36 PM
We're so well-trained to use the interfaces on Windows, that any other program is going to have to imitate that to a certain extent.

Most of Microsoft's graphical user interface was blatantly stolen from Apple. So much so that Apple managed to sue and win, which is really hard to do when it comes to software. Apple users joke that the new features that Apple has will be on Windows in a couple years, and there is a lot of truth to it.

Gilshalos Sedai
07-09-2009, 03:08 PM
Whichever. So then, Apple's the horses' ass?

Zanguini
07-10-2009, 01:14 PM
http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/2038.png

Dragon Thief
07-11-2009, 08:10 PM
Well, from all I've read upon it, the Chrome OS won't have much in the way of native applications - it's being developed as an OS to host web applications, and Google's already 'extended' the offer for MS to make an IE for Chrome OS.

Chrome OS is going to basically make your native web browser - whether that be a standards-compliant version you've downloaded (Opera, Firefox, etc) or the built in Chrome Browser act as the front end for the vast majority of the OS - it won't be an OS as you're used to it.