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View Full Version : domains, servers, etc.


Anaiya Sedai
07-13-2009, 08:06 AM
I thought I'd ask you guys for a little advice on this..
I'm looking to buy a domain for our business and find a good webhost.
I have absolutely no idea what to look for, apart from price.
I don't know what all the little numbers and specs mean...

soo, any advice would be greatly appreciated :)

Anaiya Sedai
07-13-2009, 03:21 PM
nobody? :(

Sarevok
07-13-2009, 03:25 PM
nobody? :(
Don't look at me... :o

Anaiya Sedai
07-13-2009, 03:39 PM
*looks at the other 18 people who have viewed the thread without replying*
:p

Crispin's Crispian
07-13-2009, 03:46 PM
Not sure what little numbers or specs mean, but I've used GoDaddy and Network Solutions. NetSol is more expensive.

There are plenty of domain name companies, and probably customer service and prices are really the only differentiators.

What specifically were you looking for help with?

Gilshalos Sedai
07-13-2009, 03:56 PM
I looked, but I have no answer for you.

Zanguini
07-13-2009, 04:09 PM
ask the camel or tam

Anaiya Sedai
07-13-2009, 04:52 PM
well, it's supposed to be for a business, so I don't know if I need anything specific (I need to embed some sort of payment possibility) or certificates of sorts.. uhm.. not sure, really.

Dragon Thief
07-15-2009, 05:20 PM
First question to ask yourself: will you need a Widows host or a Linux/Unix host? The biggest factor for this is what your site will be coded in and what programming features you use, if any.

Things like ASP and .NET need Windows hosting. PHP, Ruby, Perl (shudder) and many others are more common on Linux servers, although they can be ran on Windows as well.

The three most important numbers for webhosts (outside of maybe some review scores or recommendations) are:

Uptime - most guarantee 99.9%. And while that is a vast majority of time, realize that .01% x 365days x 24 hours = 87.6, or just over 3 days of downtime throughout the year by statistics. Never accept a host with less than 99.7, and look for 99.9 unless the cost is prohibitive.

Storage - this is the number of GB (or MB if you get a HORRIBLY crappy host) that you are alloted to store your site's files on. Unless your site is dealing with media (audio/video) or a library's worth of PDF files, you likely won't exceed this, but most hosts offer a few GB of storage anyways knowing you won't get that high.

Bandwidth/Transfer - this is the amount of data your host will send to people browsing your site before they charge you overages (or perhaps shut down your site if you really exceed it). Think of it as minutes on a cell phone plan. For a better example, consider this:

You have a 1MB document. Each time someone downloads that document, you subtract 1MB from your monthly available bandwidth. 1000 people = -1000MB. And it's not just files, this i ncludes images and the actual text and coding that makes up your web pages themselves. Again, outside of media, you typically won't exceed this unless your site becomes crazy popular.

Keep in mind that hosting and your domain, while often packaged together, are separate. Your domain is simply you buying the address of your site - ie, theoryland.com. It reserves that name to you, but otherwise doesn't do anything with it until you have a site hosted that is set to recieve requests for that domain. Typically you pay a yearly fee for domains (depending on if you get hosting or other packages, anywhere from free to $20 per domain is normal, most going closer to the $10-$15 range), whereas hosting can be billed in any sort of cycle - yearly, monthly, quarterly, etc, typically with longer-term packages saving you money but charging the money upfront instead of as a series of payments.

Sarevok
07-16-2009, 02:40 AM
Uptime - most guarantee 99.9%. And while that is a vast majority of time, realize that .01% x 365days x 24 hours = 87.6, or just over 3 days of downtime throughout the year by statistics. Never accept a host with less than 99.7, and look for 99.9 unless the cost is prohibitive.
Uhm, you should get your math right:
99.9% uptime = 0.1% downtime = 1/10th of 1/100th = 1/1000th of 365 days = 0.365 days, not 3.

Dragon Thief
07-16-2009, 11:03 PM
Uhm, you should get your math right:
99.9% uptime = 0.1% downtime = 1/10th of 1/100th = 1/1000th of 365 days = 0.365 days, not 3.

Er, left out a 0 in the decimal for .001 as opposed to .01.

Stupid simple math. Multiple years of calculus ruined me.