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Zanguini
07-28-2009, 11:16 AM
NEW YORK -- Michael Vick is back in the NFL. Now all he needs is a team.

Free after serving 18 months in prison for running a dogfighting ring, Vick was reinstated with conditions by NFL commissioner Roger Goodell on Monday. The former Atlanta Falcons quarterback could participate in regular-season games as early as Week 1.
More on Vick
With his decision to conditionally reinstate Michael Vick, Roger Goodell sought to balance the spectrum of views from fans, dog lovers, players, TV and business interests while considering the brand and player, Thomas George writes. More ...

» League VP Anderson: Vick could play Week 1
» Crumpler on ex-teammate: "I know he's sincere"
» La Canfora: Goodell's decision makes sense
» Dukes: Vick not likely to become a Cowboy
» Fantasy: Vick will have little impact on drafts

"This is a step-by-step process that goes up to Week 6; it is not a six-game suspension by any means," Ray Anderson, the league’s executive vice president of football operations, told NFL.com's Thomas George. "If all goes well, he could be playing anytime from Week 1 forward. Roger listened to ownership, NFL employees, friends, relatives, players, counselors, people from animal rights groups. In his typical fashion, he sought input and listened to all before acting."

Vick can immediately take part in preseason practices, workouts and meetings, and he can play in the final two preseason games -- if he finds a team that will sign him. A number of teams already have said they would not.

Once the season begins, Vick may participate in all team activities except games, and Goodell said he would consider the quarterback for full reinstatement by Week 6 (Oct. 18-19) at the latest.

Goodell indefinitely suspended Vick in August 2007 after the quarterback admitted bankrolling a dogfighting operation on his property in Virginia. At the time, Goodell said Vick must show remorse before he would consider reinstating him.

"I accept that you are sincere when you say that you want to, and will, turn your life around, and that you intend to be a positive role model for others," Goodell said in his letter to Vick informing him of the reinstatement. "I am prepared to offer you that opportunity. Whether you succeed is entirely in your hands."

"Needless to say, your margin for error is extremely limited," Goodell said in the letter. "I urge you to take full advantage of the resources available to support you and to dedicate yourself to rebuilding your life and your career. If you do this, the NFL will support you."

Goodell said he spoke to numerous current and former players and coaches as he weighed his decision and that the responses were "very mixed."

"I do recognize that some will never forgive him for what he did," Goodell said. "I hope that the public will have a chance to understand his position as I have."

Vick, once the highest-paid player in the league, said he was grateful for a second chance.

"I would like to express my sincere gratitude and appreciation to commissioner Goodell for allowing me to be readmitted to the National Football League," Vick said in a statement released by his agent, Joel Segal. "I fully understand that playing football in the NFL is a privilege, not a right, and I am truly thankful for the opportunity I have been given.

"As you can imagine, the last two years have given me time to re-evaluate my life, mature as an individual and fully understand the terrible mistakes I have made in the past and what type of life I must lead moving forward."

The announcement came after a busy first week of freedom for Vick, who met with union leaders and Goodell on consecutive days last week. Vick's 23-month federal sentence ended when an electronic monitor was removed from his ankle on July 20 at his home in Hampton, Va.

Vick met with DeMaurice Smith, executive director of the NFL Players Association, last Tuesday and with Goodell on Wednesday at a security firm in Allendale, N.J.

Goodell said Vick agreed to undergo psychiatric testing, which determined that he was capable of returning to the NFL but needed continued counseling.

Goodell said keeping Vick from playing at the start of the regular season wasn't a form of punishment but a chance for the quarterback to gradually transition back into the league.

"I have thought about every alternative, but I think this gives him the best chance for success," Goodell said. "We are not looking for failure here. We are looking to see a young man succeed."

But Vick's issues are far from over, and he needs a team to call his own. So far, the owners of the New York Giants, New York Jets and Dallas Cowboys have said they had no interest in the 29-year-old quarterback. Neither do the Falcons, who officially released Vick in June.

Vick filed for bankruptcy protection last July, listing assets of about $16 million and debts of more than $20 million, and he has a hearing about his plan to repay his creditors scheduled for Friday in Newport News, Va. That plan is built around his ability to make NFL-type money again.

Vick is unlikely to command anything close to the 10-year, $130 million contract he once had with the Falcons or to receive endorsement deals after the grisly details of the dogfighting ring were publicized.

Vick pleaded guilty after his three co-defendants already had done so. They told of how Vick participated in the killing of dogs that didn't perform well in test fights by shooting, hanging, drowning or slamming them to the ground.

Vick's appearances at federal court in Richmond, Va., prompted large groups of protesters to gather outside. Many were with PETA and held signs depicting photographs of pit bulls ravaged in dogfights. Still, there were supporters who wore Vick's No. 7 jersey.

Vick already has taken steps to rebuild his image. He met with the president of the Humane Society of the United States while serving his federal sentence in Leavenworth, Kan. He plans to work with HSUS in a program designed to steer inner-city youth away from dogfighting. He wasn't permitted to work with the program while in custody.

Ed Sayres, president of the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, said the organization hopes Vick "rises to the occasion and proves worthy of the rare second chance commissioner Goodell has granted him."

"Opportunities for redemption are rare -- but that is exactly the opportunity that awaits Mr. Vick," Sayres said.
Vick Article nfl.com (http://www.nfl.com/news/story?id=09000d5d8117f603&template=without-video-with-comments&confirm=true)
Copyright 2009 by The Associated Press


Personally I think he has payed his debt and should be allowed to play. However i've always thought of him as a mediocre quarterback at best and a bad one at worst. Yes he has running ability but his throwing mechanics are so bad its almost not worth the time.

Davian93
07-28-2009, 11:22 AM
I hope someone Joe Theisman's him.

Sinistrum
07-28-2009, 12:15 PM
My worst sports nightmare at this point is a team that I root for signing him. I would immediately write them off and root against them. I don't believe for a second that he is sorry about what he's done. That kind of cruel doesn't wash off with a few years in jail or some public humiliation. The only thing I'm convinced he's sorry about is that he got caught, he's had to pay some penalties, and now he can't do it anymore. I don't want his kind of scum mucking up any team I like and I would hope most sports fans would feel the same.

Gilshalos Sedai
07-28-2009, 12:22 PM
Ditto. After all, as many serial killer profilers can attest, it's a small step from cruelty to animals to cruelty to a human being.

tanaww
07-28-2009, 01:00 PM
I hope someone Joe Theisman's him.

Davian, the image of Joe Theismann's career ending injury is seared into my brain. Let us not speak of it again. I grieve to this day.

I think Vick should be a Viking. I mean he already knows how to party.

Matoyak
07-28-2009, 02:59 PM
The only thing I'm convinced he's sorry about is that he got caught, he's had to pay some penalties, and now he can't do it anymore.
Agreed. (I agree with your whole post, but I trimmed it down for space :D)

Zanguini
07-28-2009, 03:21 PM
Hmm I wonder who will be joining us in Fantasy Football ....and when the draft is ... and how badly i will beat all ya'll

tanaww
07-28-2009, 03:34 PM
Hmm I wonder who will be joining us in Fantasy Football ....and when the draft is ... and how badly i will beat all ya'll

There are eleven teams at this point. I expect the league to fill with 14 (those players are already invited). The draft will be when we're good and damn well ready. And you're on meth if you think you're beating me at Fantasy Football. The Blind Squirrel may have found the nut last year, but that won't happen again.

I'm the Dominating Force for a reason.

Zanguini
07-28-2009, 03:37 PM
I nearly won my league last year it had 16 teams ... i lost in the super bowl by 5 points... grrr... to someone i had already beaten twice.

Frenzy
07-29-2009, 12:40 AM
Davian, the image of Joe Theismann's career ending injury is seared into my brain. Let us not speak of it again. I grieve to this day.
ow ow ow ow ow ow OW OW OW OW OW OW OW OW OW OW OW OW OW OW OW OW
I think Vick should be a Viking. I mean he already knows how to party.
i hear the Raiders may sign him. Their asshole quotient is lagging since Bill Romanowski left. i hear they're looking into signing Terell Owens too. That should push even the Raiders over asshole and into douchebag territory.

Zanguini
07-29-2009, 08:08 AM
T.O. has already signed with Buffalo

tanaww
07-29-2009, 10:03 AM
I think the Raiders deserve T.O. and Mike Vick. That'd be perfect.

irerancincpkc
07-29-2009, 07:57 PM
He served his debt to soceity, and for all we know he could have changed. Everyone deserves a second chance...

Davian93
07-29-2009, 08:50 PM
He served his debt to soceity, and for all we know he could have changed. Everyone deserves a second chance...

I reiterate my Theisman remark.

Sinistrum
07-30-2009, 12:38 AM
Everyone deserves a second chance

No not really. This is especially true for those who prey on the helpless. I will also reiterate my belief that the only thing he's sorry about is the fact that he got caught.

Matoyak
07-30-2009, 01:43 AM
No not really. This is especially true for those who prey on the helpless. I will also reiterate my belief that the only thing he's sorry about is the fact that he got caught.
Agreed. People this cruel don't have anything to truly feel sorry with, their conscience doesn't exist.

tanaww
07-30-2009, 11:34 AM
I reiterate my Theisman remark.

And I have asked you not to speak of the Theismann incident again. God Dammit! Are you trying to rub salt in those wounds? What'd I do? Can't you say "Brady's him" or find some other analogy? Please?

Davian93
07-30-2009, 12:08 PM
And I have asked you not to speak of the Theismann incident again. God Dammit! Are you trying to rub salt in those wounds? What'd I do? Can't you say "Brady's him" or find some other analogy? Please?

Sorry, they should "Napoleon McCallum" him then.

tanaww
07-30-2009, 01:47 PM
Sorry, they should "Napoleon McCallum" him then.

Much better. And it sounds more painful!

Zanguini
07-30-2009, 04:28 PM
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) -The purple No. 4 jerseys with "FAVRE" on the back were already in heavy circulation around the Twin Cities and it seemed almost inevitable that Brett Favre would end his second retirement to join the Minnesota Vikings.

Then Favre dropped the news that surprised many - inside the organization and out - when he called Vikings coach Brad Childress on Tuesday to tell him he was staying retired and would not be joining the Vikings for training camp.

"The writing on the wall was, as long as his arm was healthy he was going to play," Vikings linebacker Ben Leber said. "I thought it was just a contractual deal that was taking so long and I really expected him to be at camp. So I was really surprised."

Now the Vikings are left to pick up the pieces after their summer-long courtship of the future Hall of Fame quarterback ended with a phone call just two days before players are required to report to training camp in Mankato.

"It was the hardest decision I've ever made," Favre told ESPN. "I didn't feel like physically I could play at a level that was acceptable. I would like to thank everyone, including the Packers, Jets and Vikings - but, most importantly, the fans."

Set to turn 40 in October, Favre told Childress that he didn't think his body could withstand a 19th season in the NFL. This after he retired for a second time, was granted his release from the New York Jets and had surgery to alleviate a torn biceps in his throwing arm, presumably to get him ready for one last run at a title.

But after two months of throwing to kids at Oak Grove High School in Mississippi, and a few interviews that seemed to indicate he was leaning toward joining the Vikings, Favre came to the conclusion that he just doesn't have it in him.

"I had to be careful not to commit for the wrong reasons," Favre said. "They were telling me, 'You went through all this, you had the surgery and you've got to finish it off.' But I have legitimate reasons for my decision. I'm 39 with a lot of sacks to my name."

In the end, the player who set nearly every significant passing record the NFL has during 16 brilliant seasons with the rival Green Bay Packers managed to hand the Vikings one more loss.

He turned down a chance to join the defending NFC North champions, a team with a stingy, veteran defense and the best running back in the NFL in Adrian Peterson. Adding Favre would have made the Vikings a stylish pick to win the NFC, but now they will have to go back to their original plan of having Tarvaris Jackson and Sage Rosenfels compete for the job.

"It was a rare and unique opportunity to consider adding not only a future Hall of Fame quarterback but one that is very familiar with our system and division," Childress said in a statement. "That does not detract from the team that we have."

Jackson's agent, Joel Segal, said his client is eager to show the Vikings, and their fans, that they had the right man for the job all along. He will be entering his fourth season in the NFL and took strides at the end of last year before a poor performance in the playoffs contributed to Minnesota's loss to Philadelphia at home.

Segal said the Vikings' pursuit of Favre has not bothered Jackson.

"Tarvaris is very even-tempered," the agent said. "He's got a very calm demeanor. No matter what he's always ready to compete."

This is Favre, of course. Over the past two seasons he has shown a penchant for changing his mind, so it wouldn't be shocking to see him reverse course and try to join the Vikings later in the preseason.

For now, at least, the Vikings seem eager to put the circus behind them and move on.

"I would love to believe him. I would love it if everybody involved could put this thing to bed and have a little respect for the other quarterbacks involved and maybe for the team," Leber said. "Nobody wants this to linger on and be an ongoing distraction. We'll see if he keeps his word. I understand he's a guy that doesn't like training camp. Nobody does."

Leber called it "a relief" to finally have an answer to the drama and Childress said he is content with what he has on his team.

"As we have consistently communicated, we feel good about our team and they have put forth a tremendous effort this offseason preparing for the season ahead," Childress said. "With this behind us, we look forward to getting to Mankato and getting training camp under way."

A couple of days old but in case you didnt know. No Favre, this year. Cheeseheads breathe a sigh of relief.

from cbs sports but im sure you would get the same from espn or fox (http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/story/11998722)

Davian93
07-30-2009, 05:21 PM
Favre was done 2 years ago...maybe now ESPN (which I've stopped watching due to FAVREMANIA and MANNYWOOD get try and regain some of the viewership it has lost due to its round the clock coverage of a washed-up oxycontin addict.

Belazamon
08-02-2009, 12:58 AM
My sister almost ran over Marcus Vick with her car once. I'm not making this up.

Nowadays, we kind of wish she had succeeded.

Davian93
08-02-2009, 01:37 AM
My sister almost ran over Marcus Vick with her car once. I'm not making this up.

Nowadays, we kind of wish she had succeeded.

Lucky he didn't pull a gun on you...he's been known to do that.

irerancincpkc
08-02-2009, 06:16 AM
Agreed. People this cruel don't have anything to truly feel sorry with, their conscience doesn't exist.
The only reason we are talking about Vick's crime is because he is famous. There are hundreds of people murdered every day around the world... not saying killing animals is a good thing, don't get me wrong, what he did was terrible, but he served his punishment. It's impossible for any of us to say one way or another that he did or didn't learn his lesson. We'll see.

GonzoTheGreat
08-02-2009, 06:29 AM
It's impossible for any of us to say one way or another that he did or didn't learn his lesson. We'll see.Actually, it is quite easy for me to say that he did not learn his lesson. I could probably say it in some different ways too. But then, I'm GonzoTheGreat, after all.
Whether or not my assesment is right is something we may see. I hope we won't, considering that the only way to prove me wrong is this is if he refrains from that type of behaviour in the future, and we won't know that he manages as long as he lives. If I'm right, we may learn a whole lot sooner.

Davian93
08-02-2009, 12:33 PM
Ask yourself this: Would another convicted FELON ever be able to go back to his employer and get his job back? The answer is a resounding NO. Thus, he still gets preferential treatment due to his celebrity status.

Belazamon
08-02-2009, 01:29 PM
Lucky he didn't pull a gun on you...he's been known to do that.Nah, she went to Burger King for lunch that day. ;)

irerancincpkc
08-02-2009, 05:20 PM
Ask yourself this: Would another convicted FELON ever be able to go back to his employer and get his job back? The answer is a resounding NO. Thus, he still gets preferential treatment due to his celebrity status.
He isn't getting his job back. The Falcons aren't taking him... he'll be with another team. And I"m sure a convicted felon has gone back to a employer before, there are other people who believe in second chances.