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View Full Version : moonshine. it's not healthy


DahLliA
09-03-2009, 09:04 PM
being on the rebound of a quite bad experience with the aforementioned brew I started wondering who the hell came up with the idea of creating this horrible stuff.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moonshine only explains how to make it and how different countries treat moonshine, but doesn't say anything about the origins.

so my question is if anyone knows where it started :p

also found this comment: "In the documentary film Metal: A Headbangers Journey by Sam Dunn. Vocalist and bassist for Motörhead, Lemmy talked about Norwegian moonshine as "something really awful and the crew wouldn't even drink it." It is also now cited as the cause of his warty appearance."

fills me with a weird sense of national pride :D

Sei'taer
09-03-2009, 10:18 PM
being on the rebound of a quite bad experience with the aforementioned brew I started wondering who the hell came up with the idea of creating this horrible stuff.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moonshine only explains how to make it and how different countries treat moonshine, but doesn't say anything about the origins.

so my question is if anyone knows where it started :p

also found this comment: "In the documentary film Metal: A Headbangers Journey by Sam Dunn. Vocalist and bassist for Motörhead, Lemmy talked about Norwegian moonshine as "something really awful and the crew wouldn't even drink it." It is also now cited as the cause of his warty appearance."

fills me with a weird sense of national pride :D

I've heard stories about the origin but I don't know if they're true. I do know that it's good for you though. My buddy used to say that it tastes like shit and everything that's good for you tastes like shit.

Orc
09-03-2009, 10:22 PM
I've heard stories about the origin but I don't know if they're true. I do know that it's good for you though. My buddy used to say that it tastes like shit and everything that's good for you tastes like shit.

That doesn't logically follow. From your assumptions, there could be things that taste like shit that aren't good for you, and moonshine could be one of them :D

Sei'taer
09-03-2009, 10:27 PM
But, when you go to the doctor and he puts you on a special diet, it usually consists of things that taste like shit, therefore if moonshine tastes like shit, it must be good for you.

Orc
09-03-2009, 10:58 PM
That's the logical equivalent of saying dogs have four legs, my cat has four legs, therefore my cat is a dog.

ShadowbaneX
09-03-2009, 11:02 PM
That's the logical equivalent of saying dogs have four legs, my cat has four legs, therefore my cat is a dog.
you mean that in jest, but I've seen similar logic applied many times on the WoT board...

StrangePackage
09-03-2009, 11:23 PM
Putcheen is probably the oldest incarnation of modern white lightning.

The famous shiner, Popcorn Sutton, lived and died not far from where I live now.

Sei'taer
09-04-2009, 07:38 AM
That's the logical equivalent of saying dogs have four legs, my cat has four legs, therefore my cat is a dog.

yup, it is.

GonzoTheGreat
09-04-2009, 07:49 AM
That's the logical equivalent of saying dogs have four legs, my cat has four legs, therefore my cat is a dog.Which, when you've consumed enough moonshine, is just about the maximum of logic you can handle. So it makes perfect sense.

And, for those who are actually interested, Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distilled_beverages) has some information on the subject.

DahLliA
09-04-2009, 08:53 AM
according to wiki you're half-way right ST

Distilled alcoholic beverages first appeared in Europe in the 12th century among alchemists who were more interested in brewing medical elixirs than in making gold from lead. They first appeared under the name aqua ardens (burning water) in the Compendium Salerni from the medical school at Salerno. The production method was written in code, suggesting that it was being kept secret. Taddeo Alderotti in his Consilia medicinalis referred to serpente, which are believed to have been the coiled tube of a still.

In 1437, burned water (brandy) was mentioned in the records of the county of Katzenelnbogen in Germany.[4] It was served in a tall, narrow glass called a “goderulffe.”

Paracelsus gave alcohol its modern name, taking it from the Arabic word which means "finely divided", in reference to what is done to wine. His test was to burn a spoonful without leaving any residue. Other ways of testing were to burn a cloth soaked in it without actually harming the cloth. In both cases, to achieve this effect the alcohol had to have been at least 95 percent, close to the maximum concentration attainable through distillation (see purification of ethanol).

they did think it was medicine.

wonder who was the first idiot to start drinking it for fun was though :p

Davian93
09-04-2009, 08:59 AM
according to wiki you're half-way right ST



they did think it was medicine.

wonder who was the first idiot to start drinking it for fun was though :p

Shot in the dark...he was Irish.

Sei'taer
09-04-2009, 09:24 AM
Worst hangover ever. That's what moonshine will do for you. And I've had a lot of hangovers. Moonshine was by far the worst.

It some places down here, when you go to a party there are pint jars on a table just inside the door and everyone picks up their pint as they go in. It's also illegal to have, but as long as you aren't transporting it or in possession of large amounts they don't say much (like if you're sitting on the porch having a sip).

Um...has anyone here had absinthe? I've always wanted to try it and supposedly they are going to start selling it in the states. Just curious what it tastes like.

Brita
09-04-2009, 09:45 AM
I do know that it's good for you though. My buddy used to say that it tastes like shit and everything that's good for you tastes like shit.

Shit tastes like shit, and I can tell you that eating shit is not good for you.

Davian93
09-04-2009, 09:48 AM
Shit tastes like shit, and I can tell you that eating shit is not good for you.

Um yeah...you're lucky I'm your Warder because you left the door wide open on that one.

~glares at everyone else~

No Obvious Jokes!!!

Zanguini
09-04-2009, 09:50 AM
I was wondering how you became a brown noser

Brita
09-04-2009, 09:56 AM
LOL!

Who, me or Dav?

Zanguini
09-04-2009, 09:57 AM
does it really matter at this point?

Brita
09-04-2009, 10:01 AM
Ah well, yes, good point.

Ahem...

As a nurse, I have seen my fair share of shit, and I have also seen the microbiology reports concerning the bacteria in said shit. Furthermore, I have seen the infections caused by such bacteria from said shit, and trust me, eating shit is not good for you.

DahLliA
09-04-2009, 11:15 AM
Worst hangover ever. That's what moonshine will do for you. And I've had a lot of hangovers. Moonshine was by far the worst.

so true. I'll go so far as to say you haven't had a real hangover until you've gotten shit-faced on coffee and shine

Um...has anyone here had absinthe? I've always wanted to try it and supposedly they are going to start selling it in the states. Just curious what it tastes like.

one word. don't :p

I've only tried the weak stuff that is legal here(40% and none of the more... colorful ingredients) and even that made us half-crazy and horribly hungover. heard of people who try the real deal(80% and up and close to the original recipe) and all of them regretted it :p

Ivhon
09-04-2009, 11:44 AM
so true. I'll go so far as to say you haven't had a real hangover until you've gotten shit-faced on coffee and shine



one word. don't :p

I've only tried the weak stuff that is legal here(40% and none of the more... colorful ingredients) and even that made us half-crazy and horribly hungover. heard of people who try the real deal(80% and up and close to the original recipe) and all of them regretted it :p

Why is there something sooo appealing to this warning?

Crispin's Crispian
09-04-2009, 12:21 PM
Ah well, yes, good point.

Ahem...

As a nurse, I have seen my fair share of shit, and I have also seen the microbiology reports concerning the bacteria in said shit. Furthermore, I have seen the infections caused by such bacteria from said shit, and trust me, eating shit is not good for you.
As they say down south, "Lord have MRSA!"

Or is it CDiff. Anyway...

I've always wondered how people discovered things like this. I'm guessing some people had some fermented grapes one time, and thought they tasted OK and gave a nice buzz. Then they thought, "well, what would fermented wheat taste like?"

Then they decided they had better distill it to get rid of the nastiness? I don't know. The process for making beer and spirits seems so complicated compared to wine that it seems unlikely to have been just stumbled upon.

GonzoTheGreat
09-04-2009, 12:47 PM
Actually, in the right place, spirits can be quite simple to make: put the wine outside, wait for it to start freezing up, pluck the bits of ice off and repeat.
This probably won't work well in Florida, but in Alaska you could try it (when not gazing at Russia, of course).

DahLliA
09-04-2009, 01:02 PM
Why is there something sooo appealing to this warning?

I have no idea what you're talking about;)

John Snow
09-04-2009, 04:26 PM
Um...has anyone here had absinthe? I've always wanted to try it and supposedly they are going to start selling it in the states. Just curious what it tastes like.

In a word - licorice - it's a lot like that stuff the rural French are so fond of, what is it? pastiche? - which, like absinthe, you mix with water to get a cloudy effect.

John Snow
09-04-2009, 04:33 PM
I've always wondered how people discovered things like this. The process for making beer and spirits seems so complicated compared to wine that it seems unlikely to have been just stumbled upon.

I have a friend at work who's Ethiopian, land of the original coffee....he even gave me a bag of unroasted wild coffee beans...the original stuff, and very nice, once roasted up. He says most Ethiopians don't drink coffee, but will roast the beans and carry a little sack of them out to the fields to work in the morning, and chew on the beans periodically during the day.

But the coffee beans are basically like little apricot pits inside this red sort of berry fruit. Why would you think that's even edible, let alone roast it, brew it, and drink the stuff. How many other plants did people try that with? We'll never know, because a lot of people who did that sort of thing likely had very short lives.

Sei'taer
09-04-2009, 05:02 PM
I did find this, Dahlia (http://recipes.howstuffworks.com/moonshine4.htm). It's more about the US though.


The History of Moonshine
There has to be a good reason to go to all the trouble of making moonshine. Actually, there have been several reasons, but they all boil down to one thing: government control of the alcohol trade.

Moonshining began very early in American history. Shortly after the Revolution, the United States found itself struggling to pay for the expense of fighting a long war. The solution was to place a federal tax on liquors and spirits. The American people, who had just fought a war to get out from under oppressive British taxes (among other purposes), were not particularly pleased. So they decided to just keep on making their own whisky, completely ignoring the federal tax.

For these early moonshiners, making and selling alcohol wasn't a hobby or a way to make extra cash -- it was how they survived. Farmers could survive a bad year by turning their corn into profitable whisky, and the extra income made a harsh frontier existence almost bearable. To them, paying the tax meant they wouldn't be able to feed their families. Federal agents (called "Revenuers") were attacked when they came around to collect the tax, and several were tarred and feathered.

All this resentment finally exploded in 1794, when several hundred angry citizens took over the city Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. President George Washington called for a gathering of militiamen under federal authority. Thirteen-thousand troops dispersed the mob and captured its leaders. This Whisky Rebellion was the first major test of federal authority for the young government.

Despite the failure of the rebellion, moonshining continued throughout the United States, especially in Kentucky, Virginia, the Carolinas and other southern states. Excise taxes on alcohol didn't go away, so moonshiners always had incentive to avoid the law. Gun fights between moonshiners and revenuers became the stuff of legend.

These battles escalated in the 1860s as the government tried to collect on the excise tax to fund the Civil War. Moonshiners and Ku Klux Klansmen joined forces, and many pitched battles were fought. The tactics of the moonshiners grew more desperate and brutal, intimidating locals who might give away the locations of stills and attacking IRS officials and their families. The tide of public sentiment began to turn against the moonshiners. The temperance movement, which sought to ban alcohol, gathered steam as the United States headed into the 20th century.

In the early 1900s, states began passing laws that banned alcohol sales and consumption. In 1920, nationwide Prohibition went into effect. It was the greatest thing the moonshiners could have asked for.

Suddenly, there was no legal alcohol available. The demand for moonshine shot up like a rocket. Moonshiners couldn't keep up with the demand, which led to cheaper, sugar-based moonshine, as well as watered-down moonshine. The distillers would do anything to increase their profit. Organized crime blossomed as speakeasies opened in every city -- these secret saloons had hidden doors, passwords and escape routes in case the "Feds" ever showed up to conduct a raid.

When Prohibition was repealed in 1933, the market for moonshine grew thin. Although moonshine continued to be a problem for federal authorities into the 1960s and '70s, today, very few illegal alcohol cases are heard in the courts. Large commercial distilleries can buy raw materials on such a large scale that, even with the taxes they must pay, their products aren't too much more expensive than moonshine. While some counties in the south and midwest United States remained "dry" (alcohol-free) for decades after the end of national Prohibition, even those localized liquor bans have, for the most part, faded away. That leaves consumers of alcohol little reason to seek out moonshine other than the temptation of buying and drinking something that's "forbidden" and the flouting of government authority. The desire to flout government authority is one of the reasons moonshining exists in the first place.

Crispin's Crispian
09-04-2009, 05:34 PM
All this resentment finally exploded in 1794, when several hundred angry citizens took over the city Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. President George Washington called for a gathering of militiamen under federal authority. Thirteen-thousand troops dispersed the mob and captured its leaders.

Then promptly got roaring drunk on the confiscated goods.

Davian93
09-04-2009, 06:31 PM
I have a friend at work who's Ethiopian, land of the original coffee....he even gave me a bag of unroasted wild coffee beans...the original stuff, and very nice, once roasted up. He says most Ethiopians don't drink coffee, but will roast the beans and carry a little sack of them out to the fields to work in the morning, and chew on the beans periodically during the day.

But the coffee beans are basically like little apricot pits inside this red sort of berry fruit. Why would you think that's even edible, let alone roast it, brew it, and drink the stuff. How many other plants did people try that with? We'll never know, because a lot of people who did that sort of thing likely had very short lives.

Its like cheese. Supposedly cheese was discovered when herders used to transport fresh milk in animal skins. The jostling of the milk in the bags with the rennet from the skin (usually stomachs) while it was being carried by a draft animal caused it to curd and voila! cheese. Then they started experimented with now many different cheeses one could make.

Trial and error basically.

GonzoTheGreat
09-04-2009, 06:44 PM
Inventing cheese was definitely an error. I'll agree with that.

Davian93
09-04-2009, 06:45 PM
Inventing cheese was definitely an error. I'll agree with that.

Without cheese there would be no grilled cheese...and that would be tragic.

Ishara
09-04-2009, 10:46 PM
ROFL

People have been fermenting things to get alcoholic things since as ling as there have been people. So I'm thinking moonshine is pretty old.

Absinthe is legal here in Canada and sold in our provincial liquor stores. Never had it though.

Frenzy
09-05-2009, 01:25 AM
a friend of mine grought back some Kentucky shine. i proceeded to drink another friend of mine under the table with it. He outmassed me by 50+ pounds. Ah, glory days. :p

making your own hooch is a time-honored tradition. And not just for degreasing engines and killing brain cells.

Terez
09-05-2009, 01:26 AM
What's the point of archives if we can still post in them??

GonzoTheGreat
09-05-2009, 04:12 AM
The Wheel of Time turns, and Archives come and pass, leaving cucumbers that become legend. Legend fades to myth, and even myth is long forgotten when the Archive that gave it birth is dug up by some Hero. In one Archive, called the Non WoT Related Discussion 09/08 - 09/09 by some, an Archive long past, an Archive yet to come, a discussion rose around moonshine. The discussion was not the beginning. There are neither beginnings nor endings to the Wheel of Time. But it was a discussion.

Terez
09-05-2009, 05:00 AM
:rolleyes: Go finish reading the chapter, Gonzo. :p