PDA

View Full Version : Jailbreaking Now Allowed


Matoyak
07-27-2010, 11:38 AM
On your iPhone, that is. (http://2su.de/7iY) (Among other devices)

Quick quote of the first paragraph:
Every three years, the Library of Congress has the thankless task of listening to people complain about the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. The DMCA forbade most attempts to bypass the digital locks on things like DVDs, music, and computer software, but it also gave the Library the ability to wave its magical copyright wand and make certain DRM cracks legal for three years at a time. This time, the Library went (comparatively) nuts (http://www.copyright.gov/1201/), allowing widespread bypassing of the CSS encryption on DVDs, declaring iPhone jailbreaking to be "fair use," and letting consumers crack their legally purchased e-books in order to have them read aloud by computers.


Any opinions out there on this matter? I'd assume at least some of y'all might have one. (or two. Or ten.) I personally do not know enough about the subject to comment, just passing on the info.

Sei'taer
07-27-2010, 04:52 PM
On your iPhone, that is. (http://2su.de/7iY) (Among other devices)

Quick quote of the first paragraph:


Any opinions out there on this matter? I'd assume at least some of y'all might have one. (or two. Or ten.) I personally do not know enough about the subject to comment, just passing on the info.


Yeah, I got something to say about it. What the hell does that mean? I just use my stuff, I don't try to break it.

Ivhon
07-27-2010, 05:13 PM
Yeah, I admit to being confuzzled.

Oatman
07-27-2010, 05:46 PM
My understanding of it, which could be completely wrong, is that jailbreaking involves replacing or altering the original operating system on any particular device so that it can be used in a different way. For example, removing the Apple software from an iPhone and replacing it with a Linux based OS. I personally don't understand doing something like this, I guess some people just resent not being able to personalise a product.\
The other part of it, I think, is talking about security measures stopping people from pirating various media.
Again, could be wrong on both of those things.

GonzoTheGreat
07-28-2010, 03:52 AM
Well, to put it in a slightly different way: should modding your car (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Car_tuning) be illegal?

Matoyak
07-28-2010, 03:55 AM
Well, to put it in a slightly different way: should modding your car (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Car_tuning) be illegal?Good metaphor, for as much as I understand of it.

Another good example would be computers. Should that be more heavily legislated? Why should phones be different?

yks 6nnetu hing
07-28-2010, 07:22 AM
few things:

1) good. Apple is notorious for restricting any non-Apple programs. They still portray themselves as an elite "niche" company but the fact of the matter is, Apple is now worth more than Microsoft (http://www.businessinsider.com/apple-worth-more-than-microsoft-2010-5). Which makes it now The Man, therefore fair game for sticking.

2) You know, I heard a bit of a WOT audiobook just a few days ago, read by a real live person. and I swear, the computer voice on Nokia training material is clearer and much easier to understand, if a little boring after 2 hours (although, to be fair, that last bit might have something to do with the subject matter). I'm sorry if I'm not... attracted to dramatic... pauses every two... words! Also, legally speaking, I think that the restriction on stopping e-books from being read aloud might have been a discrimination of visually impaired people.

Sei'taer
07-28-2010, 08:37 AM
Well, to put it in a slightly different way: should modding your car (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Car_tuning) be illegal?

The funny thing is, a lot of that stuff, while not illegal, will void your warranty. There are some mods that are definitely illegal, such as removing the catalytic converter, some mods on turbo and nitrous and a lot of suspension mods. Even tire mods will get you in trouble in some states. Tint that is too dark, etc. So while you can do some mods on your car there are a lot of illegal mods tyhat you can't make and drive your car on the road or register it.

GonzoTheGreat
07-28-2010, 08:48 AM
Yes, but the illegal ones have to do with road safety. It is not a case of being prosecuted if you happen to install Ford tyres on your Toyota Prius, nor of getting jailed if you plug a sat-nav into your original 1969 Volkswagen Beetle.

Or, perhaps even more to the point: it is not illegal to change your car so that there are different beeps for when you activate your signaling lights for a left turn or a right turn. That would be fairly equivalent to the "speech enabled e-books", I think. Both would be a great help to the visually impaired.

Sei'taer
07-28-2010, 08:53 AM
Or, perhaps even more to the point: it is not illegal to change your car so that there are different beeps for when you activate your signaling lights for a left turn or a right turn. That would be fairly equivalent to the "speech enabled e-books", I think. Both would be a great help to the visually impaired.

Ah, but if you fool with the electronics in your car, then you do void the warranty. Even something as simple as changing the settings in the computer to get better fuel mileage or more torque or change the beeps and dings will make the warranty void if you go through the computer system to do it. On my Mazda (that is now gone) if I changed the tires from low profile to regular tires, I voided the warranty. It's basically the same thing. It's not illegal, you just have to be ready to deal with the consequences of you actions.

ETA: in some states, if you plug a radar detector in your car then it is illegal.

yks 6nnetu hing
07-28-2010, 08:56 AM
The funny thing is, a lot of that stuff, while not illegal, will void your warranty.

That is also true for most of the described jailbreaking methods. Not exactly illegal but if you screw it up, you're not entitled to a refund, fix or a new copy as part of the factory warranty.

GonzoTheGreat
07-28-2010, 09:29 AM
However, the DMCA does make a lot of things illegal, which is a bit more severe (I think) than merely voiding the warranty.

Mort
07-28-2010, 05:33 PM
Wait, what? Is/was jailbreaking the Iphone illegal? Why the hell for? Voiding the warranty has always been the case with jailbreaking the Iphone, and in worst case, bricking it (making it unusuable by mistake, literally making the phone a "brick") but illegal? That's really pushing it too far.

Can't even think of someone who has been convicted of jailbreaking their Iphone...

Nice seeing it's fair use now anyways...

Matoyak
07-28-2010, 05:55 PM
Wait, what? Is/was jailbreaking the Iphone illegal? Why the hell for? Voiding the warranty has always been the case with jailbreaking the Iphone, and in worst case, bricking it (making it unusuable by mistake, literally making the phone a "brick") but illegal? That's really pushing it too far.

Can't even think of someone who has been convicted of jailbreaking their Iphone...

Nice seeing it's fair use now anyways...Well, for the next two years, at any rate. This stuff has to be re-argued over every 3 years, if I understood the article correctly.

Oatman
07-28-2010, 10:21 PM
I think the main issue with the iPhone and other such mobile phones(at least as far as legalities go) is the potential function you can get out of some of the features if you were to use different software. The wifi, bluetooth, and other short range signals emmitted and recieved by the devices give them the potential to be potent short range hacking devices, should they bypass the security measures put into the softeare by the manufacturer.
Of course, I don't know for sure that this is the case, but it sounded pretty cool in my head.

GonzoTheGreat
07-29-2010, 04:35 AM
As far as I know, Oatman, they are not even looking at such privacy angles at all.

The issue is simply that of copyright. Does the consumer have any right at all to try to get around whatever limitations someone who "sells" books or music puts on his ware?

Note: I put "sells" in quotes, because it is not really sale, apparently. If you bought it, then you would be the owner, and you could indeed do with it as you wanted. Instead, you get a lease, the conditions of which can be changed unilaterally by the official owner at any time.

It is as though you buy a chair, but you aren't allowed (by law, which is the whole point here) to put a cushion on it from another supplier than the chair producer, you aren't allowed to paint the chair if you want to, you aren't allowed to put pads underneath the legs to protect your wooden floor (because the chair producer doesn't sell those pads, and you are not allowed to use any other brand).

In short, it is not your iphone at all, but for a couple of years, the government will let you pretend that it is.

Neilbert
07-29-2010, 09:21 AM
Ah, but if you fool with the electronics in your car, then you do void the warranty.

Yes this is the rub. Also, they can "brick" your phone, selectively disable features and make you get them reinstated by a company representative. It is not a lot of protection for modders, but it is some. Also IIRC it protects against that whole buying a cd thing and then ripping it to Mp3.

Brita
07-29-2010, 10:57 AM
I "bricked" two i-pod touches on Tuesday. I left mine in the rain, I washed my son's with his shorts.

I have nothing constructive to add. This thread just brings up anguished memories of my beloved i-pod and I felt compelled to share. Thanks for listening.

Frenzy
07-29-2010, 09:29 PM
I have nothing constructive to add.
Neither do i. i keep reading the thread title and wonder what the hell jailbaiting your iphone means.

Neilbert
07-30-2010, 12:30 AM
It's a myspace thing.

GonzoTheGreat
07-30-2010, 04:15 AM
Neither do i. i keep reading the thread title and wonder what the hell jailbaiting your iphone means.I think it means dressing up your iphone as a school girl and then sleeping with it. One should not be surprised that an American government institution considers legislating the morality of this.

Ishara
07-30-2010, 09:16 AM
I "bricked" two i-pod touches on Tuesday. I left mine in the rain, I washed my son's with his shorts.

I have nothing constructive to add. This thread just brings up anguished memories of my beloved i-pod and I felt compelled to share. Thanks for listening.

That SUCKS! So sorry Brita!!!

Neilbert
07-30-2010, 11:25 AM
If you pop the one you left in the rain and let the internals dry out (maybe a mild heat source) it might survive. The one that went through the wash is screwed though.

Neilbert
07-30-2010, 11:27 AM
I think it means dressing up your iphone as a school girl and then sleeping with it. One should not be surprised that an American government institution considers legislating the morality of this.

No, it is a minor using their phone to send lewd pictures and texts to someone much older. You should know this. ;)

GonzoTheGreat
07-30-2010, 11:28 AM
If you pop the one you left in the rain and let the internals dry out (maybe a mild heat source) it might survive. The one that went through the wash is screwed though.How many iphones did it take to gather enough statistics to make such a pronouncement?

Neilbert
07-30-2010, 11:33 AM
I-Phones?
None.

Other electronic things of mine have been left out in the rain, including cell phones and survived with some TLC. Things that go through the wash are dead dead dead though.

But to answer your question a little more directly: shut up fool, don't judge me!

GonzoTheGreat
07-30-2010, 11:52 AM
But to answer your question a little more directly: shut up fool, don't judge me!You've never been on the Internets before, have you?

Brita
08-02-2010, 08:43 PM
I put both iPods in bags of rice for two days, then charged them for a day and ............ They're ALIVE!!! Both are working, in fact i am typing this on mine right now :)

Neilbert
08-02-2010, 11:38 PM
That's really clever. I'll have to remember that one.

yks 6nnetu hing
08-03-2010, 03:34 AM
water can do weird weird things to electronics. Sometimes, just a sea breeze with a bit of moisture in the air can cause permanent damage and sometimes washing the phone has no effect. A friend of mine once washed her phone, it worked almost fine afterwards, only thing was that it wouldn't ring any more. All the other functions worked fine.

I once heard a "horror story" from a guy who used to work with a phone repair factory. Every now and then when the queues for repairs got huge, they'd get lots of devices back with a note "water damage, no warranty". Which was suspicious... so they investigated and apparently the repair people were opening the phones and spraying them with water to get rid of the backlog.

Glad to hear of the rice trick though :D and glad your iPods are ok :)

GonzoTheGreat
08-03-2010, 04:02 AM
The moisture in a sea breeze can be just a little bit salty. And while salt water works very well with electronics; the reverse is a lot less the case.

Ishara
08-03-2010, 07:52 AM
I put both iPods in bags of rice for two days, then charged them for a day and ............ They're ALIVE!!! Both are working, in fact i am typing this on mine right now :)

Phew - I was going to suggest that. happy it worked!