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Davian93
09-08-2010, 06:56 PM
I made stuffed shells for dinner tonight. I kinda made a bit too much (like one entire large glass cassarole dish and another smaller one for just the two of us...we ate the smaller dish but didn't even touch the larger one) though so I'll be eating it for the next 3 days. That said, it turned out great as usual and I tried something new this time: (instead of sour cream, I used Mascarpone cheese to mix with the ricotta. Made it quite tasty actually.

Your turn...

Brita
09-08-2010, 07:22 PM
Coming from Polish heritage, borscht was always served on special occasions. This weekend I made my first Borscht ever, using fresh veggies from a friend's garden. Using my Bapcia's (Grandma in Polish) hints I managed to make it taste almost like hers.

It turned out quite good for a first try, and is great comfort food in this cool weather.

nameless
09-08-2010, 07:40 PM
Mascarpone's a nice touche, but next time try throwing some chevre in there too. It's already the perfect consistency and it adds a really nice tang to the whole mixture.

My most successful dish recently was nectarine chicken fajitas with a tequila glaze. The trick is to turn the heat up right before you throw in the nectarines so they get seared on the outside but stay fresh in the middle.

Davian93
09-08-2010, 07:43 PM
Mascarpone's a nice touche, but next time try throwing some chevre in there too. It's already the perfect consistency and it adds a really nice tang to the whole mixture.

My most successful dish recently was nectarine chicken fajitas with a tequila glaze. The trick is to turn the heat up right before you throw in the nectarines so they get seared on the outside but stay fresh in the middle.

Chevre? I shall have to try it next time.


~has never eaten Borscht...now is curious~

nameless
09-08-2010, 08:30 PM
Goat cheese isn't for everybody. I'd put a little bit on toast and see if you like it before throwing it into any recipes. Personally, it's one of my favorite cheeses.

Neilbert
09-08-2010, 08:56 PM
I baked a loaf of rosemary bread yesterday. It's gone now... :(

Ishara
09-08-2010, 09:19 PM
Mmmm, chevre. I LOVE goat cheese. I keep trying to break up with feta, but alas, it's not meant to be.

Um, we're packing, so the cooking is not so much happening these days, LOL

BUT, we made some pretty kick ass meatballs this weekend!

Sei'taer
09-08-2010, 09:22 PM
last night we had burritos, tonight it was hot roast beef and chips. Been a lazy week of cooking 'round here.

Do you do beet borscht, Brita? Not much of a fan, but I'd give it a shot.

Brita
09-08-2010, 09:43 PM
Do you do beet borscht, Brita? Not much of a fan, but I'd give it a shot.

Yes, I got several beets from a friend. Mine was made q
with beef, but it can be just veggies too. A dollop of sour cream adds just the right touch. It's not for everyone though, tis true.

Mort
09-09-2010, 06:19 AM
One of my favorites is a Taco gratin. Blend philadelphia cream cheese with some creme fraiche (sour cream, about 50/50, maybe slightly more sour cream). Put that as a bottom layer in an oven pan.
Then you fry minced meat (usually do like a pound of meat, usually enough for 4 people, or 3 hungry guys :)) with some Taco spices and some crushed tomatoes, chopped leek, an onion and a chopped bell pepper. Mix it all and put it as the second layer in the oven pan.
Then you finish off by covering it all with grated cheese, the fattier the better. Same with the sour creme, no low fat kinds, that will make it all suck.

In the oven, 225 degrees celsius (435 F) until the cheese has a nice brown color. Let it cool. Indulge with some tortilla chips. Enter heaven. :D

One Armed Gimp
09-09-2010, 07:14 AM
Grilled up some burgers this weekend. Threw diced onions, green peppers and potatoes in with the meat, was quite tasty.

GonzoTheGreat
09-09-2010, 07:29 AM
I made stuffed shells for dinner tonight. I kinda made a bit too much (like one entire large glass cassarole dish and another smaller one for just the two of us...we ate the smaller dish but didn't even touch the larger one) though so I'll be eating it for the next 3 days. That said, it turned out great as usual and I tried something new this time: (instead of sour cream, I used Mascarpone cheese to mix with the ricotta. Made it quite tasty actually.

Your turn...Is it grilled cheese in stuffed shells which you will be eating for three days straight?

Basel Gill
09-09-2010, 10:21 AM
What exactly is in borscht? I've always heard of it, knew it was supposed to have beets, but that's about it. Always love to try new things!

Brita
09-09-2010, 10:37 AM
What exactly is in borscht? I've always heard of it, knew it was supposed to have beets, but that's about it. Always love to try new things!

Create beef broth (simmering beef, 3 litres of water, one onion and dill weed for 1-2 hours). Oh, and make sure to skim the animal fat when the water boils.

Simmer 2 medium beets with 2 large tomatoes (or a can of cubed tomatoes)for one hour. I also cheated and added some OXO. You can add a little water if it's too dry.

Saute carrots and onion in butter. Add to broth. Cook for 5 mins. Add potatoes and/or cabbage. Cook for 10 mins. Add beet mixture and garlic. Cook for five minutes.

Now here is the trick: Add vinegar until it tastes like my bapcia's borcsht. I have had so many bowls of so-called borscht that taste like watery vegetable soup. It is the vinegar that gives it it's unique and delicious taste. My recipe called for 1 tsp of vinegar, but I ended up adding 5 tsp before it tasted right (and my bapcia would say I still need more :) )

Salt a pepper to taste.

Crispin's Crispian
09-09-2010, 12:23 PM
I made a beef stew the other night, since it's starting to feel like autumn. Thinking back, I don't believe I've ever actually made beef stew before, which might explain why it wasn't perfect.

Anyway, stew meat, carrots, cabbage, onion, vegetable broth, and a bottle of Black Butte Porter. It was merely OK the first day. The second day and with a little extra salt it was actually really good. I'm having it for lunch today, so we'll see how even more time affects it.

I wish I had a bottle of the porter to drink at work. ;)

Davian93
09-09-2010, 12:38 PM
I like adding a can of stewed tomatoes to beef stew and some smoked paprika for a bit of kick. I also like adding a small can of corn. I made Beef Stew last weekend and we still have several quarts of it.

fdsaf3
09-09-2010, 12:47 PM
I just bought a blender to make carrot soup, and it was fantastic. I used about two pounds of leftover carrots from my neighbor's garden, and cooked them in an oven for about 30 minutes just when they started to blacken. I sauteed some onion, potato, added chicken broth and cilantro, and then boiled for a while until the potatoes were done. Then I blended everything and got everything else back up to temp, and ate my delicious carrot soup. It was good, although next time I make this I'm going to have to eat it with a thick piece of toast and maybe a dab of sour cream.

The nice thing about making soups is that for an inexperienced and impatient cook like me, they are almost impossible to screw up. I'm almost certainly going to make a stew here within the next week or two, probably around the time of the first frost. Maybe a batch of chili as well. I love fall and winter simply because I have an excuse to eat leftovers for a few days, which is perfect for a bachelor like me!

Basel Gill
09-09-2010, 02:21 PM
Create beef broth (simmering beef, 3 litres of water, one onion and dill weed for 1-2 hours). Oh, and make sure to skim the animal fat when the water boils.

Simmer 2 medium beets with 2 large tomatoes (or a can of cubed tomatoes)for one hour. I also cheated and added some OXO. You can add a little water if it's too dry.

Saute carrots and onion in butter. Add to broth. Cook for 5 mins. Add potatoes and/or cabbage. Cook for 10 mins. Add beet mixture and garlic. Cook for five minutes.

Now here is the trick: Add vinegar until it tastes like my bapcia's borcsht. I have had so many bowls of so-called borscht that taste like watery vegetable soup. It is the vinegar that gives it it's unique and delicious taste. My recipe called for 1 tsp of vinegar, but I ended up adding 5 tsp before it tasted right (and my bapcia would say I still need more :) )

Salt a pepper to taste.

Thanks!
Couple of clarifications....do you leave the beef in it? (maybe a stupid question...) also what is OXO??

bowlwoman
09-09-2010, 02:30 PM
I am attempting to recreate a local restaurant's (Kerbey Lane) tomato pie recipe. They have a summer seasonal menu every year, and I go 2-3 times per week to have the tomato pie.

I made one last weekend, but I overestimated the amount of green onion and fresh basil, underestimated the garlic, and I couldn't ever get the feta to melt on top. Now that I've had it twice this week so far, I've been carefully noting the quantity of stuff, so I'm going to try another pass at it tonight.

If I can get it closer to KL's product, then I'll probably eat the whole darn thing myself. :)

Crispin's Crispian
09-09-2010, 02:54 PM
The nice thing about making soups is that for an inexperienced and impatient cook like me, they are almost impossible to screw up. Hah! I know the anecdote doesn't count, but I once made chicken stew and managed to screw it up. It was edible, but I added way too much black pepper so it completely overpowered everything else.

We were eating for a few minutes, and I said, "Hmm...I think I added a little too much pepper." My father-in-law looked up, chuckled, and said, "Yeah."

:o

Then I kicked him out of my house for insulting the cook.

Davian93
09-09-2010, 04:36 PM
I am attempting to recreate a local restaurant's (Kerbey Lane) tomato pie recipe. They have a summer seasonal menu every year, and I go 2-3 times per week to have the tomato pie.

I made one last weekend, but I overestimated the amount of green onion and fresh basil, underestimated the garlic, and I couldn't ever get the feta to melt on top. Now that I've had it twice this week so far, I've been carefully noting the quantity of stuff, so I'm going to try another pass at it tonight.

If I can get it closer to KL's product, then I'll probably eat the whole darn thing myself. :)

To melt the feta, did you consider tossing it under the broiler for a little bit?

Sei'taer
09-09-2010, 04:51 PM
Big go tonight!!!

We are making fresh guacamole (tomato, onion, garlic, fresh cilantro, avacado, salt and pepper and a drip or two of lemon), frying up some bacon, slicing some fresh farmers market tomato, onion, and some lettuce. I'm going to be toasting bread, sourdough if there's any left, rosemary, basil and garlic if there's not. Then I'm going to take some fresh grated dill havarti and pack it on top with a lotta mayo and go for it. I'll have to dig through the beer fridge and see what sounds good...

Anyway, stew meat, carrots, cabbage, onion, vegetable broth, and a bottle of Black Butte Porter.

Sounds awesome, except I'm not allowed to eat cooked cabbage unless it's a special occasion (like my wife won't be home). Sauerkraut is an absolute "Taer will never be allowed to eat this again" food.

Incidentally, anybody have any advice on how I can get the wax out of my cast iron dutch oven? I got it for Christmas and I've tried everything I can think of short of piling charcoal up on the ground and setting the oven over the top of it. I've had it so hot I was afraid it was going to bend or break and it still has wax in it. All I want to do is season the damn thing. I'm beginning to wonder if I should call the manufacturer and complain about the wax.

GonzoTheGreat
09-09-2010, 05:05 PM
Incidentally, anybody have any advice on how I can get the wax out of my cast iron dutch oven?This may help (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3PycZtfns_U). Then again, maybe not.
Why did you put wax in that oven, anyway?

Sei'taer
09-09-2010, 05:27 PM
This may help (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3PycZtfns_U). Then again, maybe not.
Why did you put wax in that oven, anyway?

This is more what I meant, but it didn't help anymore than the wax on wax off method. (http://whatscookingamerica.net/Information/CastIronPans.htm)

bowlwoman
09-09-2010, 06:24 PM
To melt the feta, did you consider tossing it under the broiler for a little bit?

The feta chunks got nice and toasted on the top (baked at 350 for about an hour), but they never even started melting. I read that feta really doesn't melt unless you possibly mix it with milk. I know that the feta crumbles I got at Whole Foods don't have nearly the amount of moisture that others tend to have, especially the block feta, so I'm thinking that was part of the problem. I'll do a bit of testing on the feta I bought this time, and I might mix some milk or Greek yogurt into the crumbles to help the melting.

Incidentally, anybody have any advice on how I can get the wax out of my cast iron dutch oven? I got it for Christmas and I've tried everything I can think of short of piling charcoal up on the ground and setting the oven over the top of it. I've had it so hot I was afraid it was going to bend or break and it still has wax in it. All I want to do is season the damn thing. I'm beginning to wonder if I should call the manufacturer and complain about the wax.

I read that if your pan is manufactured by Lodge (and it probably is, since I know that's what my assorted family members can find around the area of buy), they use a varnish instead of a wax. Here's what I found:

If your Dutch oven is made by LODGE, the protective coating is a sprayed varnish coating, which must be scrubbed off. Heat the Dutch oven inside your home oven to 225oF. then with a hot pad, lower the oven into hot soapy water, and scrub the Dutch oven with a S.O.S. pad. Scrub the inside and outside of the Dutch oven very well, rinse well, and towel dry. Then place the Dutch oven back into your oven at 225 to dry for about 10 to 15 minutes. The only way to dry cast iron is to dry it completely. I do mine in the oven because; the heat is not concentrated in one spot, as it is on the stove top, which can cause minute cracks.

If your Dutch oven is made by any of the other companies that make outdoor Dutch ovens, the protective coating is dipped paraffin wax, which can be burned off. Do this outdoors in your gas B.B.Q. or, a kettle type charcoal B.B.Q. like a Webber. In a charcoal B.B.Q., use Mesquite charcoal for fuel because it burns much hotter than briquettes. Start the charcoal or light the gas B.B.Q., set on high and pre-heat the B.B.Q. When the charcoal is white, spread it out a little so that is not to close to the cooking grate. Place the oven onto the cooking grate, upside down, and close the lid on the B.B.Q.
Heat the oven to 500 to 550 for 15 minutes. Close the B.B.Q. and cook the Dutch oven for about 1 hour at 500 to 550, or until the oven stops smoking. Cool the scrub the oven and dry as directed above.

It think the key is heat to soften the coating, then a lot of soap, scrubbing pads, and elbow grease. Another website suggested boiling vinegar in the pan, since the vinegar might strip or soften the coating. You could also try scrubbing it out with salt (I use salt to scrub mine out all the time). Good luck. It's a pain the patootie.

Sei'taer
09-09-2010, 06:28 PM
I read that if your pan is manufactured by Lodge (and it probably is, since I know that's what my assorted family members can find around the area of buy), they use a varnish instead of a wax. Here's what I found:



It think the key is heat to soften the coating, then a lot of soap, scrubbing pads, and elbow grease. Another website suggested boiling vinegar in the pan, since the vinegar might strip or soften the coating. You could also try scrubbing it out with salt (I use salt to scrub mine out all the time). Good luck. It's a pain the patootie.

I'll see what happens...

bowlwoman
09-09-2010, 06:41 PM
I'll see what happens...

Here's a method that sounds intriguing...get a steel wool pad for your hand/detail sander (I KNOW you have one), and go to town. No elbow grease required, just a vibrating hand. :)

Crispin's Crispian
09-09-2010, 06:56 PM
No elbow grease required, just a vibrating hand. :)

I...yeah.

bowlwoman
09-09-2010, 07:15 PM
I...yeah.

Exactly. :)

Davian93
09-09-2010, 08:16 PM
Here's a method that sounds intriguing...get...your hand...and go to town. No elbow grease required, just a vibrating hand. :)


Edited for clarity.


ROFLMAO

Brita
09-09-2010, 08:51 PM
Thanks!
Couple of clarifications....do you leave the beef in it? (maybe a stupid question...) also what is OXO??

Yes, definitely leave the beef in. I just use stewing beef. And OXO is a brand of beef bouillon powder.

Davian93
09-09-2010, 09:02 PM
Yes, definitely leave the beef in.

Giggity.

bowlwoman
09-09-2010, 09:18 PM
Edited for clarity.


ROFLMAO

:D I aim to please.

Anaiya Sedai
09-10-2010, 07:15 AM
I made vegetable soup with the bits and pieces that I harvested last week - two leeks, about a lb of potatoes, a cabbage, lb of carrots, a few onions, garlic. All from my garden. Everything chopped really small, then cooked all the vegetables apart from the potatoes in olive oil with some fresh herbs, doused the whole thing in stock (I cheated and used OXO) and added the tiny chopped potatoes, cooked for about 10 more minutes, and that was it.
I made so much though that I added some soup noodles to some of it the next day, and bits of meat to another lot and froze quite a bit of it, because otherwise we'd never stop eating soup.

The cabbage gives it a nice sour note and it's lovely with added creme fraiche :)

And for the first time in a good while I can actually say I feel quite hungry now.

AbbeyRoad
09-12-2010, 10:55 AM
Man all this talk of food is making me entirely too hungry. I can't wait until I'm not a broke med student and can afford spend the money and energy on good food.

Ivhon
09-12-2010, 11:05 AM
I am attempting to recreate a local restaurant's (Kerbey Lane) tomato pie recipe. They have a summer seasonal menu every year, and I go 2-3 times per week to have the tomato pie.

I made one last weekend, but I overestimated the amount of green onion and fresh basil, underestimated the garlic, and I couldn't ever get the feta to melt on top. Now that I've had it twice this week so far, I've been carefully noting the quantity of stuff, so I'm going to try another pass at it tonight.

If I can get it closer to KL's product, then I'll probably eat the whole darn thing myself. :)

Hmm....I haven't had Kerby Lane's tomato pie.

Ill have to try it out before posting my recipe. (Un)fortunately, there is a Kirby Lane 1 block from one of my advisors' office (that is a grammatically challenging sentence, btw).

bowlwoman
09-12-2010, 10:08 PM
Hmm....I haven't had Kerby Lane's tomato pie.

Ill have to try it out before posting my recipe. (Un)fortunately, there is a Kirby Lane 1 block from one of my advisors' office (that is a grammatically challenging sentence, btw).

I love it. I didn't get a chance to rere-create it yet, but it's on the agenda for this week. If you get a chance to try it, let me know what you think.

yks 6nnetu hing
09-13-2010, 06:31 AM
Coming from Polish heritage, borscht was always served on special occasions. This weekend I made my first Borscht ever, using fresh veggies from a friend's garden. Using my Bapcia's (Grandma in Polish) hints I managed to make it taste almost like hers.

It turned out quite good for a first try, and is great comfort food in this cool weather.

yum!

another yummy beet dish is what I know as "summer soup" - because it's served cold. It's mostly beet and potatoes cut up into smal-ish cubes and boiled together, then drained and cooled. Then add small bits of pickles and any other veggies you might like. Some people like fresh red cabbage for the crunch, can also add sauerkraut but in that case it can't be too vinegary and needs to be literally sour, like the name says. When I was a kid, mom would sometimes cut up hot dogs to add some meat, but this is purely a matter of taste. Mix everything together and add cold buttermilk to make it a soup, season with salt and pepper, parsely and dill. Spring onion is also good. Add a freshly (hard)boiled and cut up egg on top.

chevre - yuck! one of the few things that I don't eat. along with lard and manna. And I have been known to make concessions on the lard - the Hungarian kind, with pepper... mmmm....

Anaiya Sedai
09-14-2010, 04:55 PM
I bought a new book a few days ago: 365/Dish a day Plus one for leap years. It's basically a calendar with a recipe every day, and I've decided to stick to it for a while, because it has a bunch of dishes in it that I either normally wouldn't cook, or possibly wouldn't even try because I've never had them before. So far we've had Chargrilled pepper salad and Hot Red Berry pastry nests. Tomorrow it's Chicken breasts with smoked ham and parmesan. Mmmmm :)

I know this is going to (deliberately) be misunderstood by a bunch of people, but I'm going to write it anyway: I like trying new things :D