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Universum
11-21-2010, 04:38 PM
Ok, so apart from anything WOT-related, what are you/have you recently finished/are you going to start reading in the near future, and why?

Due to studies I just finished Shakespeare's Julius Caesar and Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita. During the week to come I will start reading Jane Austen's Mansfield Park.

For fun I am, at the moment, only reading wot. I ain't got the time to read anything else too. I dislike that. Not having the time to read all I want to read. -_-

Jonai
11-21-2010, 04:55 PM
Well...I'm rereading WoT for pleasure actually. I know I know you said besides WoT. :). I'm also rereading Elizabeth Haydon's Rhapsody trilogy. I wonder if the books after Destiny are worth reading. Anyone know? I had completely forgotten its November and all, what with ToM coming out and such. I've got to get my hands on the latest Tad Williams novel. :)

Mam A'Lemur
11-21-2010, 05:13 PM
Well...I'm rereading WoT for pleasure actually. I know I know you said besides WoT. :). I'm also rereading Elizabeth Haydon's Rhapsody trilogy. I wonder if the books after Destiny are worth reading. Anyone know? I had completely forgotten its November and all, what with ToM coming out and such. I've got to get my hands on the latest Tad Williams novel. :)

I've been meaning to finish the Rhapsody books. I read the first (and I think the second one?) when they first came out, then got sidetracked.
I'm re-reading a Patricia Cornwell (non Scarpetta) book in addition to my re-read of ToM.

Weird Harold
11-21-2010, 05:55 PM
Currenty re-reading The Rivan Codex as filler betweent he two library books I just finished and the three library holds that are listed as "in transit"

The two I just finished are Intrigues: a Novel of Valdemar by Mercedes Lackey, book two of the Collegium Chronicles and The Wee Free Men by Terry Pratchett, a Young Adult Discworld Novel and first of four Tiffany Aching books (so far.)

Two of the three other Tiffany Aching books are among the In Transit books and the third in Transit is ToM. The fourth Tiffiany Aching book is also on hold at the library but I'm ninth in line.

dominominic
11-21-2010, 06:07 PM
Ok, so apart from anything WOT-related, what are you/have you recently finished/are you going to start reading in the near future, and why?

Due to studies I just finished Shakespeare's Julius Caesar and Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita. During the week to come I will start reading Jane Austen's Mansfield Park.

For fun I am, at the moment, only reading wot. I ain't got the time to read anything else too. I dislike that. Not having the time to read all I want to read. -_-

Breakfast of Champions by Kurt Vonnegut at the moment. Like it so far, not sure if the primary-school-teacher-esque tone is deliberate or not yet though.

Spasmodean
11-21-2010, 06:27 PM
Re-reading Raymond E. Feist/Janny Wurts Mistress of the Empire books.

I always liked the idea of big magical wasps.

dominominic
11-21-2010, 06:45 PM
Re-reading Raymond E. Feist/Janny Wurts Mistress of the Empire books.

I always liked the idea of big magical wasps.

I killed 11 wasps this summer. Most of them with elastic bands. Those things freak me out when they get in my little shop!

Belazamon
11-22-2010, 12:56 AM
Just got Deepsix and Chindi by Jack mcDevitt (scifi) from the library - I liked the first book in the series, so I'm going for the rest. Also randomly picked up a steampunk novel by George Mann called The Affinity Bridge; don't know anything about the author and never heard of the book, but the cover jumped out at me, so we'll see. Also waiting on my hold for River of Gods by Ian McDonald.

And I just realized all those authors have last names that start with M. Which doesn't surprise me for the planned reads, but is amusing for the one I randomly grabbed.

yks 6nnetu hing
11-22-2010, 02:41 AM
Just finished Freedom's Choice by Anne McCaffrey, which means that the last book of the trilogy will be coming next... am almost done with book 2 of Malazan, which means that I'll probably be getting started on book 3 soon-ish, am thinking of a re-read of Harry Potter before the very last movie comes out. There are also some history books that I keep thinking I should read... who knows, I might actually do it one of these days.

GonzoTheGreat
11-22-2010, 04:12 AM
I'm rereading 1632, mostly because I got a bit exasperated with the History of Philosophy I'm reading. I'd just gotten through Schopenhauer, and immediately the book slammed Nietzsche into my face. I may disagree with Descartes, but I don't think German philosophers are much of an improvement. Does anyone know any Belgian ones I could try?
Technically, I'm also reading the Bible, but I don't think I've progressed even one page during this century, so I'm not entirely sure that counts.

Mort
11-22-2010, 05:05 AM
I'm rereading 1632, mostly because I got a bit exasperated with the History of Philosophy I'm reading. I'd just gotten through Schopenhauer, and immediately the book slammed Nietzsche into my face. I may disagree with Descartes, but I don't think German philosophers are much of an improvement. Does anyone know any Belgian ones I could try?
Technically, I'm also reading the Bible, but I don't think I've progressed even one page during this century, so I'm not entirely sure that counts.

Belgians should stick to what they know, waffles.
The bible, lol.

Not reading anything at the moment. I was gonna start on "Brave new world" but never got around to it. A little swamped in other stuff atm. I'll probably pick something up to read at christmas vacation.

Jonai
11-22-2010, 05:13 AM
Belgians should stick to what they know, waffles.
The bible, lol.

Not reading anything at the moment. I was gonna start on "Brave new world" but never got around to it. A little swamped in other stuff atm. I'll probably pick something up to read at christmas vacation.

Does that mean Swedes should stick to meatballs? ;)

GonzoTheGreat
11-22-2010, 05:31 AM
Belgians should stick to what they know, waffles.They probably did. That would explain why they don't have any notable philosophers.

Davian93
11-22-2010, 07:49 AM
What I've read recently:

Towers of Midnight (probably 4 times total at this point)
The Elenium (just for fun...took 5 days to read all 3 as its a very easy relaxing read)
The Way of Kings (about 150 pgs in...I put it down to read Towers of Midnight and haven't gotten back into it. Its been too hectic to focus on a new indepth novel like that.
Master & Commander
Harry Potter & Sorcerors Stone (easy read along the lines of the Elenium basically)

I typically read some books to just relax before sleep (the easy ones) and others when I actually have time to focus (tWoK type stuff)

Universum
11-22-2010, 07:57 AM
Does that mean Swedes should stick to meatballs? ;)

Swedish meatballs are, however, completely awesome.

yks 6nnetu hing
11-22-2010, 08:00 AM
Does that mean Swedes should stick to meatballs? ;)

but... but... hmm, Kirkegaard was Danish.

There's always Borelius though. Good old J. J. Borelius.

Universum
11-22-2010, 08:07 AM
But Borelius was kinda cool though. When my fiancé has grown old, I totally want him to look like Borelius did when he came to age. http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f6/Borelius%2C_Johan_Jacob_-_portr%C3%A4tt_-_AF.jpg/404px-Borelius%2C_Johan_Jacob_-_portr%C3%A4tt_-_AF.jpg

Friggin' awesome.

Zanguini
11-22-2010, 08:54 AM
Reading ToM currently
Later today I will read some french realism that I dont want to.
I will probably pick up Potter 2 this week sometime.
Ive also the Dresden files short story collection to read.

Belazamon
11-23-2010, 01:30 AM
Swedish meatballs are, however, completely awesome.
Agrees:
http://i91.photobucket.com/albums/k320/jalapenoguy/SwedishChef.jpg

Orc
11-23-2010, 07:59 AM
Belgians should stick to what they know, waffles.

Ok, but how do you read a waffle?

Orc
11-23-2010, 08:03 AM
Just finished Freedom's Choice by Anne McCaffrey, which means that the last book of the trilogy will be coming next...

But there are four books in the series!

I'm reading the Belisarius series by Eric Flint and David Drake currently.

GonzoTheGreat
11-23-2010, 08:13 AM
Ok, but how do you read a waffle?Practice.
Seems to take a lot of waffles, for some reason.

But there are four books in the series!So it's a trilogy in five parts. Not the first of that type, you know.

I'm reading the Belisarius series by Eric Flint and David Drake currently.A good series, that. Flint is very good at collaborations.

yks 6nnetu hing
11-23-2010, 08:37 AM
But there are four books in the series!

I'm reading the Belisarius series by Eric Flint and David Drake currently.

:o yeah, I noticed that last night when looking for the "last" one.

Khoram
11-23-2010, 09:18 AM
I have just finished "Against All Things Ending" by Stephen R. Donaldson.

I'll probably concentrate on school reading for the next couple of weeks, seeing as the smester's ending soon, and exams are coming up.

If I were to start reading something else, though, it'd probably be... Wizard's First Rule? *ducks* joking :D

I don't really know. Maybe re-re-read A Question of Honor (it's about the Kosciuszko Squadron during the Second World War). That or the Bro Code or the Playbook. ;)

Weird Harold
11-23-2010, 02:14 PM
So it's a trilogy in five parts. Not the first of that type, you know.

AFAIK, Piers Anthony is responsible for the current popularlity of that particular bad joke, which he started with the fourth Xanth and has continued through 29 more books with book 34 of the "Xanth Trilogy" (Knott Gneiss)coming soon.

I'm currently reading book 13 of the WOT Trilogy. :D

Khoram
11-24-2010, 12:35 PM
Just started Lady Chatterley's Lover by D.H. Lawrence.

It's the Liberal Artist in me. ;)

Madgod
11-26-2010, 06:38 PM
I finished the first two books of ASoIaF, then read TOM. Haven't had time to read anything since, but am planning to pick up either Don Quixote or Malazan over Christmas break.

Ishara
11-26-2010, 07:24 PM
I'm now on Sourcery and wondering why I waited THIS long to dig into Terry Pratchett.

I accidentally found out that a guy on my team at work is a WoT freak after he was railing at the store not having paperback copies of tGS. I offered him my copy and he traded me for the first 3 Discworld books and it's been GREAT! Of course, now he's been theorizing to me in his spare time. LOL

I told him to check TL out...we'll see how long it takes. ;)

WinespringBrother
11-29-2010, 12:50 PM
I'm now on Sourcery and wondering why I waited THIS long to dig into Terry Pratchett.

I accidentally found out that a guy on my team at work is a WoT freak after he was railing at the store not having paperback copies of tGS. I offered him my copy and he traded me for the first 3 Discworld books and it's been GREAT! Of course, now he's been theorizing to me in his spare time. LOL

I told him to check TL out...we'll see how long it takes. ;)

I started reading Discworld after hearing good recommendations of it by Brandon and Harriet. Still haven't finished the first book though, too many distractions LOL

TankSpill
12-02-2010, 10:47 AM
I've started re-reading the first two books in Tad Williams Shadowmarch series so that I can read the conclusion. I'm also about to force myself to re-read A Game of Thrones again so that I will be prepared for the HBO show, but I'm really not looking forward to this task.

Khoram
12-02-2010, 10:59 AM
Well, the only thing I'm reading right now are my notes for my classes :( - I hate exams. So much. *tear*

ChubbyAiel
12-03-2010, 03:38 AM
I'm reading the Monarchies of God by Paul Kearney. It's a fantasy set in a gunpowder age and has a very heavy nautical theme. Seems good so far. Also reading The Sword of Shadows by JV Jones, but waiting for the paperback of the most recent book.

GonzoTheGreat
12-03-2010, 06:59 AM
Just finished Freedom's Choice by Anne McCaffrey, which means that the last book of the trilogy will be coming next... am almost done with book 2 of Malazan, which means that I'll probably be getting started on book 3 soon-ish, am thinking of a re-read of Harry Potter before the very last movie comes out.

Harry Potter & Sorcerors StoneYou lot may be interested in this (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horror_on_Snape_Island):
The film is regarded by horror fans as being ahead of its time ...Well, I would say, with a title "Horror on Snape Island" in 1972 already.

I was rather surprised when I saw this too, I have to admit.

Orc
12-03-2010, 08:09 AM
Harry Potter & Sorcerors Stone

This just makes me sad.... Apparently American publishers don't think that Americans will know what a philosopher is.

GonzoTheGreat
12-03-2010, 08:29 AM
This just makes me sad.... Apparently American publishers don't think that Americans will know what a philosopher is.They are probably right. Look on the bright side: it suggests that American publishers have at least some knowledge.

Khoram
12-03-2010, 11:31 AM
They are probably right. Look on the bright side: it suggests that American publishers have at least some knowledge.

:eek:

Well, if they didn't have any knowledge, I guess they wouldn't have published WoT, now would they? :rolleyes:

Yellowbeard
12-03-2010, 12:55 PM
have also recently read:

-the pacific

-way of kings

-towers of midnight

about to start one called "with the old breed" by eugene sledge. really looking forward to it.

What Martyn Did
12-03-2010, 01:58 PM
I'm reading Sword of Shannara out loud to my son. A difficult out-loud read, as it has a very long paragraph structure, but not as hard as The Silmarilian, which I read over the Summer. I stink at foreign languages!

I'm reading Guardians of Ga'Hoole, book one, The Capture, to my daughter.

I'm reading Overcoming Dislexia by Sally Shaywitz, MD to myself off and on and just getting into my reread of Crossroads of Twilight.

I'm listening to Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows narrated by Jim Dale in the car when my son is with me.

Khoram
12-03-2010, 02:07 PM
have also recently read:

-the pacific



As in concerning the Second World War, or fiction? It sounds interesting.

The first thing I thought of when I read this was: The Pacific HBO mini-series by Tom Hanks and Steven Spielberg. :D

I'm reading Sword of Shannara out loud to my son. A difficult out-loud read, as it has a very long paragraph structure, but not as hard as The Silmarilian, which I read over the Summer. I stink at foreign languages!

The Sword of Shannara was one of the first fantasy books I read - my dad introduced the series to me, and I really enjoyed each of the book - even the The Scions of Shannara onward.

Very good read.

Crispin's Crispian
12-03-2010, 03:14 PM
I just read ToM, and am now almost done with The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest. From what I understand from Ishara, I'll be wishing a posthumous fourth book was coming out. :/

I have to wait a few months for the next Malazan book and years for WoT, so I may cave to my wife's request and read The Time Traveler's Wife.

I recently read Ghost Ship: The Mysterious True Story of the Mary Celeste and her Missing Crew by Brian Hicks, which was pretty interesting. I dig documentary accounts of famous almost-supernatural mysteries, so I'll have to find some more.

I recently started reading Guns, Germs, and Steel, but got really bored for some reason about 100-150 pages into it. Returned it to the library.

Finally, I'm considering embarking on the Harry Potter series, of which I've only read the first book. My son's a little young for it (he could totally read it, but it might be a little mature), but it would be cool to read it together.

Ishara
12-03-2010, 03:48 PM
LOL@SDog. I think I got confused with The Girl who Played with Fire. I haven't read the last one yet, but the second one made me want to kick someone with its ending. Let me know if it's good!

The Time Traveler's Wife was amazing. I will never, ever read it again, but it was a beautiful read. I found it to be brutally heartbreaking but have been told that I'm oversensitive on the topic of this book. I totally recommend it.

As for HP...well, you know your son best obvs. But they get darker and scarier quickly, so if you start just keep that in mind.

yks 6nnetu hing
12-03-2010, 05:49 PM
I recently started reading Guns, Germs, and Steel, but got really bored for some reason about 100-150 pages into it. Returned it to the library.

Finally, I'm considering embarking on the Harry Potter series, of which I've only read the first book. My son's a little young for it (he could totally read it, but it might be a little mature), but it would be cool to read it together.

Guns Germs and Steel... with that one I kept having to remind myself that the guy was a biologist. I mean, what he does is interesting (and I assume other biologists read Guns like psychologists read any Oliver Sacks book - which are awesome, definitely recommend) but for us mere mortals it can be hard to slog through. The second half picked up quite a bit, once he got more in the ethnographical "mode". Meaning, stories about actual peoples.

Also, Harry Potter rules!

also, also, I'm re-discovering Bernard Cornwell. I really liked his Sharpe series, both the books and the tv-series (young Sean Bean was HOT (http://www.fusiliers.net/gallery/roly/br_sharpe1a.jpg)!!! Although, to be fair, he's not bad at all (http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_AUeLvQH26tA/SYYVhVrWGbI/AAAAAAAABbI/ZbsjDeDSvRM/s400/7.jpg) in the newer series either) let's see what I think of the newest books...

Yellowbeard
12-03-2010, 09:19 PM
As in concerning the Second World War, or fiction? It sounds interesting.

The first thing I thought of when I read this was: The Pacific HBO mini-series by Tom Hanks and Steven Spielberg.

i haven't seen the mini-series yet. hoping for a christmas present...

but the book was written as a companion to the series. hugh ambrose (son of steven ambrose who wrote band of brothers) put it together. i thought the sections that described what e. sledge went thru on pelilieu and okinawa were mesmerizing. and there's also a narrative from a dive bomber pilot's experiences, in particular dive bombing japanese carriers at midway. those sections were amazing.

"with the old breed" was written by eugene sledge and he's one of the guys portrayed in "the pacific" as well. he's memoir is considered the definitive work for those wondering about what it was like to be a marine in the island hopping campaign in the south pacific against the japanese.

"band of brothers" the book was infinitely better than the mini-series, but even the mini-series was quite good too.

when i finish old breed i'm considering rereading HP, but not sure yet.

Khoram
12-03-2010, 10:11 PM
I got Band of Brothers for my birthday last year, and I spent a couple of days watching it in entirety after school finished - it was one of the best tv series (mini-series) I have ever seen - I really got attached to the men of Easy Company. I have the book, and am awaiting a good time to read it.

I, too, am waiting to get The Pacific, hopefull as a gift at Christmas - if not, I'll buy it.

GonzoTheGreat
12-04-2010, 04:21 AM
Guns Germs and Steel... with that one I kept having to remind myself that the guy was a biologist. I mean, what he does is interesting (and I assume other biologists read Guns like psychologists read any Oliver Sacks book - which are awesome, definitely recommend) but for us mere mortals it can be hard to slog through. The second half picked up quite a bit, once he got more in the ethnographical "mode". Meaning, stories about actual peoples.GG&S is an even easier read than the Origin of Species. Of course, Darwin's book is definitely to be recommended, even if he now and then gets carried away by all those flapping* pigeons.

* More appropriate than "flaming", I would say.

Ishara
12-04-2010, 11:23 AM
also, also, I'm re-discovering Bernard Cornwell. I really liked his Sharpe series, both the books and the tv-series (young Sean Bean was HOT (http://www.fusiliers.net/gallery/roly/br_sharpe1a.jpg)!!! Although, to be fair, he's not bad at all (http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_AUeLvQH26tA/SYYVhVrWGbI/AAAAAAAABbI/ZbsjDeDSvRM/s400/7.jpg) in the newer series either) let's see what I think of the newest books...
I haven't read any of the Sharpe series, but fell in love HARD for his Winter King series. It is my all-time favourite rendition of King Arthur and Camelot. Perhaps it is time for a re-read...

I just got The Hunger Games trilogy from a friend and have been told to wait until I have free time as I'll be refusing to put them down. Can't wait!

Khoram
12-04-2010, 11:30 AM
I re-read King of Shadows yesterday - I finished it in about 2 hours (with stopping) - it's only about 189 pages long.

I had read it in Secondary 1 (Grade 7), and I figured I'd read it for nostalgia's sake.

Davian93
12-04-2010, 07:49 PM
I recently started reading Guns, Germs, and Steel, but got really bored for some reason about 100-150 pages into it. Returned it to the library.

Honestly, I read it simply because it was supposed to be really good...and the info/conclusions in it are excellent. However, its very boring...as is "Collapse".

ChubbyAiel
12-07-2010, 04:33 AM
The Sharpe books are all right. The first few are good but then I think they get a bit samey. I haven't read any for nearly ten years, though, so maybe I'm being a bit harsh. I think they're one of the few instances where the TV adaptations/films are better than the books. Sean Bean, Daragh O'Malley and Pete Postlethwaite (when he's in it) were brilliant.

yks 6nnetu hing
12-07-2010, 04:41 AM
The Sharpe books are all right. The first few are good but then I think they get a bit samey. I haven't read any for nearly ten years, though, so maybe I'm being a bit harsh. I think they're one of the few instances where the TV adaptations/films are better than the books. Sean Bean, Daragh O'Malley and Pete Postlethwaite (when he's in it) were brilliant.

true enough. I was always impressed at the level of detail in all the big battle scenes. the research of exactly how the battle formations were, the terrain, obstacles, the personalities of the generals... and so on. And I liked the way the whole army-society was done, where the power lines ran and who got promoted for what. What was considered honourable and what not. Considering the initial premise, the later books indeed got a bit incredible what with Sharpe's promotions and how they always ended up in the thick of all the most important battles, from Trafalgar to Waterloo :p

dominominic
12-07-2010, 05:45 PM
Just started China Mieville's "City and the City".

Good so far!

Belazamon
12-08-2010, 12:19 AM
Just started China Mieville's "City and the City".

Good so far!
I enjoyed that one quite a lot. Still waiting to go back to Bas-Lag, though.

Daekyras
12-08-2010, 02:45 AM
The Time Traveler's Wife was amazing. I will never, ever read it again, but it was a beautiful read. I found it to be brutally heartbreaking but have been told that I'm oversensitive on the topic of this book. I totally recommend it.



A lot of people who have had an similar experience will become over sensitive to anything pertaining to it as they go along.

This raises the question: When did you have an experience with a TIME TRAVELLER!!!? LoL

The Sharpe series was excellent TV. Mrs. Daek loves Sean Bean too. I should be jealous cause he has a house\apartment 5 doors up from us and sometimes I think she's semi stalking him! In our 7 years here though I'd say I've seen him 5 times and only spoken to him once.

The Pacific was not as good as Band of Brothers. Felt too....confused.

I'm physics rather than biology but I found Guns, germs and steel an entertaining read. Can be really slow though.

As for right now- I just finished the Tamuli by David Eddings for the first time in 12 years. Ah, sweet memory plays tricks on us.

Today I'm starting to read some Larry Niven. The mote in Gods eye. Great Sci-Fi just to give myself a fantasy break.

looqas
12-08-2010, 02:52 AM
I got Band of Brothers for my birthday last year, and I spent a couple of days watching it in entirety after school finished - it was one of the best tv series (mini-series) I have ever seen - I really got attached to the men of Easy Company. I have the book, and am awaiting a good time to read it.

I, too, am waiting to get The Pacific, hopefull as a gift at Christmas - if not, I'll buy it.

I bought The Pacific and while it's good, it's not as magical as BoB was. Somehow it's more disjointed and you don't grow so attached to the characters. But it's still good and gets a bit better towards the end.

Golden hint for you! Check out the EP10 end credits and you'll finally put a name to the face of those old timers you can optionally see talking about the events in the current episode.

When I was watching I was itching to know who they were but BOO for Spielberg/Hanks for not naming them when they are telling about it. They just remained any regular joe the marine or a ship's cook as far as you know. Also play the chapters with historical back-ground and you'll get out of the series much more (check all the menus and you'll find this option).

On topic. I'm currently reading Sons of Encouragement by Francine Rivers and after that I got a line of books to read through, e.g. American Assassin by Vince Flynn. It's a series of Jason Bourne-esque type of operative in the War against Terrorism era. It's of course very pro-Bush type of viewpoint and action packed, but it's well written, the Mitch Rapp character is likable and easy to read. It's somehow a feel good book and I can recommend it to any who liked Jason Bourne (both books and the movies). I'm itching of a re-read of ToM, but I'm waiting a bit so that I start forgetting about it.

Mat
12-08-2010, 03:31 AM
Just finished ToM and the re-read of some parts.

I ordered a few books from Herrmann Hesse and will start as soon as they arrive.

I heard good things about The Black Magician Trilogy from Trudi Canavan.
Has anybody read that?

yks 6nnetu hing
12-08-2010, 03:45 AM
Just finished ToM and the re-read of some parts.

I ordered a few books from Herrmann Hesse and will start as soon as they arrive.

I heard good things about The Black Magician Trilogy from Trudi Canavan.
Has anybody read that?

Canavan's good, although maybe a bit simple after you're used to WoT. I liked her Age of the Five trilogy better, you could tell that after the success of the Black Magician, her publishers were willing to give her 1) more space to write in and 2) more leeway in what she wrote. Also, quite aside from the books themselves, I always LOVE the covers of her books. Can definitely tell that she used to be in that business (before she started writing for a living, that is) and has been able to get some excellent ideas into the covers and design.

Hesse's fun, I really liked Siddharta. Don't recommend to read them all in one go though, that's probably why I didn't like Steppewolf as much, the writing style got a bit too similar. Spaced out between other writers though, top notch!

Ishara
12-08-2010, 09:19 AM
A lot of people who have had an similar experience will become over sensitive to anything pertaining to it as they go along.

This raises the question: When did you have an experience with a TIME TRAVELLER!!!? LoL



Well, no. But, the premise of what the time travelling does to the couple, how it affects them - what it ultimately means made me really, really sad. Devestated, actually. I overthink things though.

PEOPLE! Why are we not talking about the Hunger Games?! This trilogy is easily the most riveting read I've had this year - maybe moreso than ToM. (With ToM, I felt like i was hanging out with old friends. Even through I was really excited to hear about them, I knew they'd be around for a while and come back to life if they died, so I wasn't too fussed.) Seriously. Everyone must read it. Dystopic United States, crazy killing games and a really great cast of characters.

Davian93
12-08-2010, 09:26 AM
When I was watching I was itching to know who they were but BOO for Spielberg/Hanks for not naming them when they are telling about it. They just remained any regular joe the marine or a ship's cook as far as you know. Also play the chapters with historical back-ground and you'll get out of the series much more (check all the menus and you'll find this option).



They did the same exact thing on Band of Brothers...did it bother you then too?

Khoram
12-08-2010, 10:06 AM
When I was watching I was itching to know who they were but BOO for Spielberg/Hanks for not naming them when they are telling about it. They just remained any regular joe the marine or a ship's cook as far as you know. Also play the chapters with historical back-ground and you'll get out of the series much more (check all the menus and you'll find this option).

I wanted to know who was talking at the beginning of the episodes, too, but I was pleased that they indicated who was who at the end of the series, after it was all done. It felt good to finally be able to put a face to the names of the men that we got to know over the span of the series.

Davian93
12-08-2010, 10:49 AM
I wanted to know who was talking at the beginning of the episodes, too, but I was pleased that they indicated who was who at the end of the series, after it was all done. It felt good to finally be able to put a face to the names of the men that we got to know over the span of the series.

They do it that way on purpose (not naming them till the end). That way, you're not biased for or against certain guys, etc etc. I had no issues with it at all.

As for the Pacific vs. BoB...Nothing will ever compete with BoB. It is the platinum standard for how a Mini-series and history should be portrayed. However, The Pacific was amazing in its own right. THe first 4 episodes were a bit slow but the final 6 were amazing. Those final 6 were every bit as good as any of the BoB episodes.

IMHO, Why We Fight was the best episode of BoB with Currahee right behind it. I had read the book years before the mini-series and both of those episodes really captured what Ambrose had written about Easy Company.

Khoram
12-08-2010, 11:13 AM
IMHO, Why We Fight was the best episode of BoB with Currahee right behind it. I had read the book years before the mini-series and both of those episodes really captured what Ambrose had written about Easy Company.

Why We Fight was one of my favourite episodes - it's an extremely touching scene.

The Breaking Point, I must say, was another one of my favourites - Spiers is absolutely awesome. And crazy - I can't imagine anybody actually running through the crossfire like that.

dominominic
12-08-2010, 02:19 PM
I enjoyed that one quite a lot. Still waiting to go back to Bas-Lag, though.

I've only read Kraken of his other work. I loved the wild imagination but thought the plot was thin.

I heard City and the City had a more satisfying storyline so I've gone for that next.

Belazamon
12-08-2010, 02:40 PM
I've only read Kraken of his other work. I loved the wild imagination but thought the plot was thin.
I was honestly less than impressed with Kraken. Seemed like he was trying to hard for a Neil Gaiman Neverwhere kind of vibe, and the story didn't really support it.

The Bas-Lag books - Perdido Street Station, The Scar, and Iron Council - are where his imagination really cuts loose.

dominominic
12-08-2010, 04:05 PM
I was honestly less than impressed with Kraken. Seemed like he was trying to hard for a Neil Gaiman Neverwhere kind of vibe, and the story didn't really support it.

The Bas-Lag books - Perdido Street Station, The Scar, and Iron Council - are where his imagination really cuts loose.

I'll get around to those in time. When I saw the amount of awards City and the City got I thought it would be a good one to try.

Have been wanting to read Neverwhere for a while but I only buy ebooks now and it's not available "in my territory" at the moment.

I mean, I'm flattered they think all of Europe is my territory but I'd rather just have the book.

Ivhon
12-08-2010, 04:21 PM
Right now Im in the various middles of:

Man's Search for Meaning - Viktor Frankl
The Boy Who was Raised as a Dog - Bruce D. Perry
Psycheye - Akhter Ahsen
Intimacy & Desire - David P. Schnarch
Raising an Emotionally Intelligent Child - John Gottman

Davian93
12-08-2010, 06:54 PM
Right now Im in the various middles of:

Man's Search for Meaning - Viktor Frankl
The Boy Who was Raised as a Dog - Bruce D. Perry
Psycheye - Akhter Ahsen
Intimacy & Desire - David P. Schnarch
Raising an Emotionally Intelligent Child - John Gottman

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
Master & Commander

Ishara
12-09-2010, 09:34 AM
Have been wanting to read Neverwhere for a while but I only buy ebooks now and it's not available "in my territory" at the moment.

I feel that it may change the way you look at subways forever. Honestly, it's one of my all-time favourites.

Crispin's Crispian
12-09-2010, 12:44 PM
@Ishara--thanks for the inspiration on TTW. ;) Sounds kind of like The Road was for me. Incredible book, but I absolutely do not want to read it again. As for Hornet's Nest...the final one is better than the second one, which ended terribly and was full of complete implausibilities. The final book is also full of such, but it's a better read. ;)

For YKS and re: G,G,&S...I do have a biology degree, so I suppose some of it was obvious and maybe a little too textbookish for me. For whatever reason, the discussion on agriculture was not stimulating. I'm interested in that, so it should have been, but it wasn't. :(

yks 6nnetu hing
12-09-2010, 03:20 PM
For YKS and re: G,G,&S...I do have a biology degree, so I suppose some of it was obvious and maybe a little too textbookish for me. For whatever reason, the discussion on agriculture was not stimulating. I'm interested in that, so it should have been, but it wasn't. :(

did not know that. And weird... I mean, I thought I was supposed to find half of it bewildering and boring.... so I didn't mind. this coming from a person who once did an exam on the history of agriculture. Oral exam, ended up with a question about reindeer herding. (The average reindeer is about 1,4 m tall, weighs up to 400 kg, both the males and females have horns and they eat pretty much anything herbal. They migrate so any herders must migrate with them, hence the complicated border agreements between Finland, Sweden and Norway... and so on)

your sig still makes me laugh:D

dominominic
12-09-2010, 03:39 PM
I feel that it may change the way you look at subways forever. Honestly, it's one of my all-time favourites.

Gak. I might have to read it on horrible, horrible paper if it's really that good!

Crispin's Crispian
12-09-2010, 04:00 PM
did not know that. And weird... I mean, I thought I was supposed to find half of it bewildering and boring.... so I didn't mind. this coming from a person who once did an exam on the history of agriculture. Oral exam, ended up with a question about reindeer herding. (The average reindeer is about 1,4 m tall, weighs up to 400 kg, both the males and females have horns and they eat pretty much anything herbal. They migrate so any herders must migrate with them, hence the complicated border agreements between Finland, Sweden and Norway... and so on)

your sig still makes me laugh:D

What's the difference between a reindeer and a caribou?

Also, where to the Lapps fit in?

yks 6nnetu hing
12-09-2010, 04:06 PM
What's the difference between a reindeer and a caribou?

Also, where to the Lapps fit in?

the Lapps fit in Lapland, obviously.

I think it's just semantics, same species several names...

also, a wikipedia search shows that I remembered a few things wrong. oh, what a surprise!

dominominic
12-09-2010, 04:47 PM
the Lapps fit in Lapland, obviously.

I think it's just semantics, same species several names...

also, a wikipedia search shows that I remembered a few things wrong. oh, what a surprise!

Maybe it is Wikipedia who is wrong!

Crispin's Crispian
12-09-2010, 05:16 PM
Maybe it is Wikipedia who is wrong!

Blasphemy!


Anyway, I was partially serious about the Lapps. I actually don't know anything about Sami politics, but I always assumed they considered themselves rather independent of the countries through which they migrate. I know it's not quite like the Kurds in Iraq and Turkey, but...

Anyway, I was going to make a joke, but I just learned that "Lapp" can be considered derogatory.

dominominic
12-09-2010, 05:31 PM
I just had a thought: anyone who answered the original question with anything other than "this thread" is a liar and probably cheats at Nintendo.

Crispin's Crispian
12-09-2010, 07:24 PM
I just had a thought: anyone who answered the original question with anything other than "this thread" is a liar and probably cheats at Nintendo.Well, if you want to be that way, everyone should have answered with, "I'm not reading anything right now, I'm typing."

Ishara
12-09-2010, 07:53 PM
The Road, eh? I have a policy about not watching/ reading things which I know will upset me overmuch (hence not reading TTW again or ever, EVER watching the Notebook), so it sounds as if I should avoid it as well. Good tip!

dominominic
12-10-2010, 01:28 AM
Well, if you want to be that way, everyone should have answered with, "I'm not reading anything right now, I'm typing."

"Technically correct: the best kind of correct"

-Futurama

yks 6nnetu hing
12-10-2010, 02:50 AM
Blasphemy!


Anyway, I was partially serious about the Lapps. I actually don't know anything about Sami politics, but I always assumed they considered themselves rather independent of the countries through which they migrate. I know it's not quite like the Kurds in Iraq and Turkey, but...

Anyway, I was going to make a joke, but I just learned that "Lapp" can be considered derogatory.

They do and it is. I think the derogatory comes from the fact that reindeer herding makes them migrant, which means that they didn't develop "civilisation" in the Western sense. That, and the fact that when they kill a reindeer, they use every single part of it. And I mean everything.

There are special rules in the Arctic of Scandinavia to allow the Lapps to migrate without visas, customs checking and so on - technically they are bringing a lot of goods from one country to the other but... eh... not in the way or for the same purpose as people nowadays usually do that. That's pretty much the gist of it the way I understood, but it might be better to ask one of our resident Finns or Swedes :)

looqas
12-10-2010, 06:59 AM
They do and it is. I think the derogatory comes from the fact that reindeer herding makes them migrant, which means that they didn't develop "civilisation" in the Western sense. That, and the fact that when they kill a reindeer, they use every single part of it. And I mean everything.

There are special rules in the Arctic of Scandinavia to allow the Lapps to migrate without visas, customs checking and so on - technically they are bringing a lot of goods from one country to the other but... eh... not in the way or for the same purpose as people nowadays usually do that. That's pretty much the gist of it the way I understood, but it might be better to ask one of our resident Finns or Swedes :)


It's not just Sami that get to cross borders without even stopping at the border. I can walk or drive to Sweden or Norway if I want to and all I really need is some kind of ID. I might not be even stopped unless customs flag me down for inspection. The whole Nordic system is kind of Schengen+ scheme and has been there for decades.

Sami people and other people living in the border region go across the border without any problems. They are a small minority and it's not like they are trying to get into country illegally per se. Not much up there except wilderness so who cares if people are moving across the border. Sure smuggling is in the works. But a lot of Norwegians for example go to Sweden and Finland to buy smokes and booze and ham.

Crispin's Crispian
12-10-2010, 11:14 AM
The Road, eh? I have a policy about not watching/ reading things which I know will upset me overmuch (hence not reading TTW again or ever, EVER watching the Notebook), so it sounds as if I should avoid it as well. Good tip!

No, you should read it. It's really good. Just...emotionally challenging.

WinespringBrother
12-10-2010, 11:28 AM
Gak. I might have to read it on horrible, horrible paper if it's really that good!

I hear there was also a TV adaptation, though I never saw it. The book was pretty good however.

dominominic
12-11-2010, 02:58 AM
I hear there was also a TV adaptation, though I never saw it. The book was pretty good however.

I love books but I hate the amount of space they take up. That's why I only buy ebooks now. I used to own thousands of paper books but I gave most of them to a charity shop about 18 months ago.

Khoram
12-11-2010, 04:51 PM
I love books but I hate the amount of space they take up. That's why I only buy ebooks now. I used to own thousands of paper books but I gave most of them to a charity shop about 18 months ago.

There's something about e-books that I don't like - maybe it's the fact that I'll end up reading for too long, and ruin my eyes more than they already are.

I like the feel of having a book in my hands; having an e-book reader will feel too weird to me, I think.

Weird Harold
12-11-2010, 05:14 PM
There's something about e-books that I don't like - maybe it's the fact that I'll end up reading for too long, and ruin my eyes more than they already are.

I like the feel of having a book in my hands; having an e-book reader will feel too weird to me, I think.
Reading a big book like ToM is pain -- for me, literally a pain because I broke my wrist a year or so back and holding any weight at all for any length of time is painful.

An eBook reader would still cause a problem, but it at least would be a consistent problem and I wouldn't have to worry about sticking to short paperbacks or other measures to protect my wrist. :D

Khoram
12-11-2010, 08:30 PM
Reading a big book like ToM is pain -- for me, literally a pain because I broke my wrist a year or so back and holding any weight at all for any length of time is painful.

An eBook reader would still cause a problem, but it at least would be a consistent problem and I wouldn't have to worry about sticking to short paperbacks or other measures to protect my wrist. :D

I can understand the value in an e-book reader (as in situations such as your own) but I don't think I'd ever be able to read a book in such a way.

I had trouble with ToM, too, as I'm sure most, if not all, readers had as well - but I personally enjoy books in such a form, even if it throws my back out when carrying it to school. ;)

dominominic
12-12-2010, 02:19 AM
I can understand the value in an e-book reader (as in situations such as your own) but I don't think I'd ever be able to read a book in such a way.

I had trouble with ToM, too, as I'm sure most, if not all, readers had as well - but I personally enjoy books in such a form, even if it throws my back out when carrying it to school. ;)

A lot of people think that but it's only odd for a while.

After a short time you're just engrossed in the story, just as you would be with a paper book. You forget what you have in your hand.

yks 6nnetu hing
12-12-2010, 01:02 PM
A lot of people think that but it's only odd for a while.

After a short time you're just engrossed in the story, just as you would be with a paper book. You forget what you have in your hand.

This is true. After a while you completely get used to the ebook format. I find myself interested in paper books that are 1) well written 2) really beautifully bound. So that not only what is in the pages but also the pages themselves are art. I once saw this edition of Goethe's Faustus... mmmm... it ws wonderful, with the original etches (reproduced, but still), surperior quality paper, wonderful layout and design. Now that was a Book!

Khoram
12-12-2010, 01:48 PM
This is true. After a while you completely get used to the ebook format. I find myself interested in paper books that are 1) well written 2) really beautifully bound. So that not only what is in the pages but also the pages themselves are art. I once saw this edition of Goethe's Faustus... mmmm... it ws wonderful, with the original etches (reproduced, but still), surperior quality paper, wonderful layout and design. Now that was a Book!

Mmmmm... that sounds great...

I guess I should try it - you never know, maybe I can find the books I need for my classes in e-book format. ;)

If I can, then I'll definitely get an e-book reader!

Madgod
12-12-2010, 04:57 PM
I'm hopefully getting a Nook for Christmas. I love having a real book in my hands and will still buy physical copies of books, but I decided that my dorm room can only hold so many 1,000 page books.

And I'm currently reading A Storm of Swords and doing a quick reread of the Harry Potter series.

Daekyras
12-13-2010, 08:41 AM
This is true. After a while you completely get used to the ebook format. I find myself interested in paper books that are 1) well written 2) really beautifully bound. So that not only what is in the pages but also the pages themselves are art. I once saw this edition of Goethe's Faustus... mmmm... it ws wonderful, with the original etches (reproduced, but still), surperior quality paper, wonderful layout and design. Now that was a Book!

I was very lucky to have a very close friend have a set of books made for me. They cost a small fortune(i'd say) but were amazing. Finest quality leather and bindings and the paper just had that....smell of quality. I love them.

I also like books in general. there is a great catharthis to feeling a book in your hand.

I don't think i could get used to ebooks.

Crispin's Crispian
12-13-2010, 10:39 AM
I'm hopefully getting an e-Reader for Christmas, too. I just decided a few weeks ago that I really wanted one, because I have about two dozen books under my bed thanks to a dearth of bookcase space. And I know I can read electronic text faster, for some reason.

Anyway, I'm excited.

Davian93
12-13-2010, 10:57 AM
I'm hopefully getting an e-Reader for Christmas, too. I just decided a few weeks ago that I really wanted one, because I have about two dozen books under my bed thanks to a dearth of bookcase space. And I know I can read electronic text faster, for some reason.

Anyway, I'm excited.

I love my Kindle...but I also love real books. The Kindle is awesome for travel, reading at work on breaks, etc.

Khoram
12-13-2010, 11:22 AM
I love my Kindle...but I also love real books. The Kindle is awesome for travel, reading at work on breaks, etc.

And real books are perfect for snowy nights, in front of a fire, sitting in a comfortable armchair, with a glass of whiskey (or cognac, or bourbon, etc.), and a pipe... and a dog named Rex. Can't forget the dog.

This all in a sitting room.

Madgod
12-13-2010, 01:11 PM
And real books are perfect for snowy nights, in front of a fire, sitting in a comfortable armchair, with a glass of whiskey (or cognac, or bourbon, etc.), and a pipe... and a dog named Rex. Can't forget the dog.

This all in a sitting room.

Absolutely agreed - but with a cat rather than a dog. Cats are cute. Of course, hard to hide the fireplace and bookshelves in a small room. That is in fact the main asset to an e-reader holds a lot of books in a small space.

Khoram
12-13-2010, 05:13 PM
Absolutely agreed - but with a cat rather than a dog. Cats are cute. Of course, hard to hide the fireplace and bookshelves in a small room. That is in fact the main asset to an e-reader holds a lot of books in a small space.

But big rooms are much more... welcoming, I find. E-readers are too mechanical.

Which is, of course, what they are: machines. But I digress.

Madgod
12-13-2010, 05:52 PM
But big rooms are much more... welcoming, I find. E-readers are too mechanical.

Which is, of course, what they are: machines. But I digress.

They are, but I am living on a college campus nine out of twelve months. That puts a crimp on my living space, so an e-book, while mechanical, is almost necessary. If I ever get my own home a nice large reading space would be high on necessary rooms list, but until then I'm happy with a more mechanical item.

Khoram
12-13-2010, 06:13 PM
They are, but I am living on a college campus nine out of twelve months. That puts a crimp on my living space, so an e-book, while mechanical, is almost necessary. If I ever get my own home a nice large reading space would be high on necessary rooms list, but until then I'm happy with a more mechanical item.

In situations like that, I'll tend to agree.

It's a good thing I don't live on-campus. ;)

Crispin's Crispian
12-14-2010, 04:50 PM
Well, I'm disappointed that Kindle doesn't let you get ebooks from anywhere else. This means that I can't use my B&N membership if I do indeed get a Kindle. Boo.

Khoram
12-14-2010, 06:42 PM
Well, I'm disappointed that Kindle doesn't let you get ebooks from anywhere else. This means that I can't use my B&N membership if I do indeed get a Kindle. Boo.

Just don't get the iPad - as Frank Marino has told me multiple times, they're evil. ;) I mean, what's with the bite out of the apple? What's with the apple!? There's symbolism in this...

yks 6nnetu hing
12-15-2010, 02:03 AM
am now done with The Last Kingdom and just started with the next one by Cornwell (The Pale Horseman? I forget the name of the book...) and as always, the historical background is superbly researched, the writing style echoes the style of the old chronicles, minus the religious hooplah seeing as he made his main character... well... not really a Christian. I really like the laconic style of writing, pretty much just stating the bare facts and yet... the characters are alive and interesting, the plot moves fast and the intrigues are sometimes baffling (to the main character) but in a really understandable way seeing as usually it's the Church that's doing the intriguing.

Recommended reading for Erikson on how one should 1) write indifference to casual violence 2) write casual violence (the imagery of guts trampled in mud, glistening like very large earthworms... lovely) 3) write battles.

Khoram
12-15-2010, 06:48 AM
Just finished Band of Brothers (the book) and am now rereading All Quiet on the Western Front. Amazing book.

yks 6nnetu hing
12-15-2010, 07:58 AM
Just finished Band of Brothers (the book) and am now rereading All Quiet on the Western Front. Amazing book.

That it is. Remarque is far superior to Hemingway, that whiny drunken bastard

Ishara
12-15-2010, 09:28 AM
I hear there was also a TV adaptation, though I never saw it. The book was pretty good however.

Just finished Band of Brothers (the book) and am now rereading All Quiet on the Western Front. Amazing book.

An amazing book - and the movie is a beautiful rendition of it, in my opinion.

So much so that seeing the actor who played Paul as the "bad" guy in so many things over the past 10 years has been jarring. Like my Westley from the Princess Bride. I'm not comfortable with him being evil. :(

Davian93
12-15-2010, 10:40 AM
Just finished A Song For Arbonne (reread) and now its back to Master & Commander I suppose. Maybe I'll pick up tWoK again...I put it down to read ToM and never got back to it as its such a big committment to read a new epic fantasy book that big.

Before Song for Arbonne, I reread the HP series in about a week...very enjoyable read the 2nd time around actually.

Ishara
12-15-2010, 12:19 PM
PEOPLE. I cannot stress enough to you how The Hunger Games must be the next thing you read! At the very least, if you have a teenager who likes to read at ALL, give them this book (or series if you like them). It's 3 books, they're less than 250 pages each and they are full of awesome and epic win.

Davian93
12-15-2010, 12:50 PM
PEOPLE. I cannot stress enough to you how The Hunger Games must be the next thing you read! At the very least, if you have a teenager who likes to read at ALL, give them this book (or series if you like them). It's 3 books, they're less than 250 pages each and they are full of awesome and epic win.

What is "The Hunger Games" exactly? Is it fantasy? Is it young adult?

Ishara
12-15-2010, 01:47 PM
It's technically YA, but truly, some of the best stuff I've read this year. Really makes you think....

It's a dystopic North America, with all nations gone. There's a big central city called the Capitol and it rules over what was once 13 Districts. There was an uprising in the past, and as retribution for the war, District 13 was bombed and wiped out. As punishment for the other 12 Districts participating in the uprising, they have since been forced to send 2 teenages between 12-18 every year to participate in The Hunger Games, which is a fight to the death of 24 kids. The Games are televised, and everyone is forced to watch. The winners achieve extra food for everyone in their District for a year and are presented with a life of luxury - and danger - that they never knew existed before. And that's where it starts to get CRAZY.

I cannot recommend it enough. Truly. It's social commentary on the reality culture, it's politically thought provoking, it's got military aspects, hunting, crazy violence, and no sex, but lots of subterfuge. It's awesome.

WinespringBrother
12-23-2010, 02:27 PM
Finally finished The Color of Magin, starting The Wandering Fire now, also re-reading The Name of the Wind. I'm psyched about the glowing review for The Wise Man's Fear(to be published in March) on Tor.com.

Khoram
12-23-2010, 05:41 PM
Restarted Sword of Shannara. Felt like reading something fairly easy that I've already read before.

So far awesome. I forgot what it was like, and now I can fully see the parallels between SoS and LotR.

Insane Ducky
12-23-2010, 10:38 PM
It's technically YA, but truly, some of the best stuff I've read this year. Really makes you think....

It's a dystopic North America, with all nations gone. There's a big central city called the Capitol and it rules over what was once 13 Districts. There was an uprising in the past, and as retribution for the war, District 13 was bombed and wiped out. As punishment for the other 12 Districts participating in the uprising, they have since been forced to send 2 teenages between 12-18 every year to participate in The Hunger Games, which is a fight to the death of 24 kids. The Games are televised, and everyone is forced to watch. The winners achieve extra food for everyone in their District for a year and are presented with a life of luxury - and danger - that they never knew existed before. And that's where it starts to get CRAZY.

I cannot recommend it enough. Truly. It's social commentary on the reality culture, it's politically thought provoking, it's got military aspects, hunting, crazy violence, and no sex, but lots of subterfuge. It's awesome.


Wait, a bunch of teenagers are put in a position where they statistically know they are likely to die soon, and no one has sex? I know this is fantasy, but please...a little realism!

nameless
12-23-2010, 11:48 PM
Abstinence only education at work, maybe?

Weird Harold
12-24-2010, 12:00 AM
Wait, a bunch of teenagers are put in a position where they statistically know they are likely to die soon, and no one has sex? I know this is fantasy, but please...a little realism!
It is Young Adult Fantasy -- think 1950's television rules for depicting sex. :D

Terez
12-24-2010, 02:46 AM
It's technically YA, but truly, some of the best stuff I've read this year. Really makes you think....

It's a dystopic North America, with all nations gone. There's a big central city called the Capitol and it rules over what was once 13 Districts. There was an uprising in the past, and as retribution for the war, District 13 was bombed and wiped out. As punishment for the other 12 Districts participating in the uprising, they have since been forced to send 2 teenages between 12-18 every year to participate in The Hunger Games, which is a fight to the death of 24 kids. The Games are televised, and everyone is forced to watch. The winners achieve extra food for everyone in their District for a year and are presented with a life of luxury - and danger - that they never knew existed before. And that's where it starts to get CRAZY.

I cannot recommend it enough. Truly. It's social commentary on the reality culture, it's politically thought provoking, it's got military aspects, hunting, crazy violence, and no sex, but lots of subterfuge. It's awesome.
Sounds kinda like The Long Walk (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Long_Walk).

GonzoTheGreat
12-24-2010, 04:46 AM
It is Young Adult Fantasy -- think 1950's television rules for depicting sex. :DBased on what I was fantasizing about when I was a young adult, I have to agree with those who say that it is rather unrealistic.

Weird Harold
12-24-2010, 05:54 AM
Based on what I was fantasizing about when I was a young adult, I have to agree with those who say that it is rather unrealistic.
So were 1950's era standards and practices rules. :D

Didn't stop Mrs Grundy from trying to "protect the children." :(

Crispin's Crispian
12-27-2010, 02:39 PM
I just finished The Time Traveler's Wife, and I can totally empathize with you, Ishara. It was heartbreaking and uplifting at the same time. For personal reasons and timing, I can say with some confidence that I also never want to read it again. My wife wants to watch the movie now that I'm finally done, so we might check that out. Again...not sure how that will go over.

ETA:

I'm going to download The Hunger Games to my Kindle (!) tonight.

Ishara
01-05-2011, 01:32 PM
I just finished The Time Traveler's Wife, and I can totally empathize with you, Ishara. It was heartbreaking and uplifting at the same time. For personal reasons and timing, I can say with some confidence that I also never want to read it again. My wife wants to watch the movie now that I'm finally done, so we might check that out. Again...not sure how that will go over.

ETA:

I'm going to download The Hunger Games to my Kindle (!) tonight.

I heard the movie was less than awesome. I hope you enjoy it (if you end up wacthing it!).

So? What did you think of Hunger Games?!

Crispin's Crispian
01-05-2011, 01:48 PM
I heard the movie was less than awesome. I hope you enjoy it (if you end up wacthing it!).

So? What did you think of Hunger Games?!

Still working on it. I'm probably 3/4 of the way through the first book, and I love it!

Crispin's Crispian
01-06-2011, 11:46 AM
Still working on it. I'm probably 3/4 of the way through the first book, and I love it!

OK, just finished. Why do I keep letting myself get roped into series??!

Brita
01-06-2011, 12:06 PM
OK, just finished. Why do I keep letting myself get roped into series??!

I was off sick yesterday, and so I curled up with The Hunger Games, and devoured it in a day. What a great story! I cried several times. I can't wait to dive into the next installment.

Ishara
01-06-2011, 12:43 PM
But, at least it's 1) a short series, 2) it's complete. Once you finish Catching Fire, just imagine waiting for over a year for the next installment.

I *loved* the Hunger Games, but I actually loved Catching Fire more. So many amazing new characters.

DeiwosTheSkyGod
01-13-2011, 05:43 PM
Just wanted to chime in on the Hunger Games, too. My cousin randomly gave it to me to read the other day, and I was snowed in today and read it all in one sitting. So good. Going out to get the next one tomorrow...

Spasmodean
03-19-2011, 06:00 PM
The Sookie Stackhouse series of books by Charlaine Harris.

I am a sucker for anything with vampires in it.

Khoram
03-19-2011, 09:27 PM
I am a sucker for anything with vampires in it.

*shudder*

I'm reading God's Bits of Wood by Sembene Ousmane - this is for my African History class - I'm writing a paper on it. Fun -_-

Mort
03-20-2011, 01:58 PM
I just finished two books. Brave new world by Aldous Huxley. A seemingly simple story with a deepness to it. Aren't done reflecting on it.

Also read Player One by Douglas Coupland. Become a big fan of his books. I loved JPod or example. His characters are so awesome and weird at the same time.

Something quite different I read recently is Free by Chris Anderson. The author of The long tail. If you're interested in the internet and it's business models it's quite interesting. As you might expect, "free" is key here :)

Next book I'm gonna look into is probably Generation A by Douglas Coupland or maybe some sci-fi, long time since I read any (if you don't count brave new world that is).

ChubbyAiel
03-21-2011, 05:59 AM
I'm reading Mistborn at the moment. I've borrowed them from my brother. I'm loving the magic system. Seems pretty original to me and I love the fact the Mistborn themselves aren't all-powerful, and the Mistings even less so.

Madgod
03-21-2011, 10:25 AM
Mistborn is really good, you'll probably enjoy it. I'm currently re-reading ASoIaF along with Leigh on Tor.com, and re-reading Malazan also.

jason wolfbrother
03-21-2011, 10:30 AM
Started rereading Malazan while waiting for Crippled God and Stormwielder to arrive. Books finally arrived but I'm only on House of Chains currently. Almost finished but I figure I'll reread the entire series in chronological order. The question is where to put Stormwielder, the third installment from Ian C. Esslemont? I know it takes place after RotCG, which precedes Toll the Hounds, but is it after TtH and before Dust of Dreams or after Dust of Dreams? Or immediately after RotCG?

ChubbyAiel
05-05-2011, 02:55 AM
Finished Mistborn around Easter. You're right Madgod - it did enjoy it very much. Then I read Watcher of the Dead, which is part of JV Jones' Sword of Shadows - anyone reading that series?

Reading "Among Thieves" now. Only a few pages in so not sure what to make of it at the moment. It's a first person fantasy about an underworld enforcer-type thief character.

Crispin's Crispian
05-10-2011, 06:29 PM
Started rereading Malazan while waiting for Crippled God and Stormwielder to arrive. Books finally arrived but I'm only on House of Chains currently. Almost finished but I figure I'll reread the entire series in chronological order. The question is where to put Stormwielder, the third installment from Ian C. Esslemont? I know it takes place after RotCG, which precedes Toll the Hounds, but is it after TtH and before Dust of Dreams or after Dust of Dreams? Or immediately after RotCG?

I'm probably going to pickup Stormwielder tomorrow. Not sure where it fit in either, but I'm done with everything else Malazan, so...

Right now I'm reading the Harry Potter series. I read book one many years ago, and bought the entire series box set once it came out in January. Pretty exciting stuff, though it's not quite as deep as I'm used to.

I downloaded The Alchemist on my Kindle, just because it was cheap and I heard it was really good. I'm only reading it during my son's swimming lessons, though, so it's really progressing slowly...

Ishara
05-11-2011, 06:08 AM
HATED the Alchemist. Am trying to get my hands on the rest of the Percy Jackson books. Just finished a reread of the Warlord Chronicles and it made me sad.

yks 6nnetu hing
05-11-2011, 06:28 AM
I quite liked the Alchemist. However, any other Coelho book (or a re-read of Alchemist) is unbearable because he keeps banging on the same point over and over and over (and over) again.

Weird Harold
05-11-2011, 12:59 PM
Currently Reading Cryoburn: latest in Lois McMaster Bujold's Miles Vorkoskigan saga. I came with a Baen Free Library CD with the rest of the "Vorkisiverse" so I'll probably be re-reading in that universe for a couple of days while I wait for somebody to return 1636: The Saxon Uprising; latest in the Ring of Fire series.

Just finished The Land of Painted Caves, by Jean Auel, and a nearly complete re-read of the Ring of Fire series including the paper editions of the Grantville Gazette and Ring of Fire Anthologies.

I am however missing at least one short story inthe ring of fire series that I know I've read but can't find again: the short story that includes Duke Eberhard willing Wurtemberg to the people of Wurtemberg on his death-bed. One of the main characters from that short stort figures prominantly in 1635: The Eastern Front.

Madgod
05-11-2011, 10:26 PM
I am still working on Malazan Book of the Fallen series. Started GotM in late December, and just started Dust of Dreams last week. That says something about the quality of the work and my amount of free time.

jason wolfbrother
05-12-2011, 11:12 PM
I'm on book 6 (of 7) of The Crippled God. Worked my way through the reread of all things Malazan while waiting for my books to arrive. After reading Stormwielder I would place it concurrent with Toll the Hounds. Definitely before Dust of Dreams and The Crippled God (which are technically one really really really big book ;)).

ChubbyAiel
06-02-2011, 08:22 AM
I'm making a rare foray into non-fantasy and reading Catch-22 at the moment. My brother and a couple of friends rave about it.

yks 6nnetu hing
06-02-2011, 02:19 PM
Started Memory of Ice - so far I'm not as annoyed with it as I was with the first 2 books of the series. We'll see how it pans out.

a very weird combination to that is The Land of Painted Caves - rather unbelievable how much overlap there is in the flintknapping department between these 2 books. bizarre combination, and very funny to think that Erikson might have stolen something from Auel :D

I also recently read the trilogy King Byren's KIn. Fairly standard Fantasy and the writing itself could do with improvement but I really quite liked the atmosphere and pace of the books. If you're looking for action-packed stuff, this is it.

Zanguini
06-22-2011, 01:19 AM
At home I am reading The Shining Ones which is book 2 of the Tamuli by the Eddings'es. after I finish I will plow my way through the dreden files in preparation for the next book coming at the end of next month


At work I am reading book one of the Southern Victory series (special order 192) How few remain. by turtledove perhaps I will actually finish the series this time I would need to buy the rest of the books though.

sandoz12
06-22-2011, 02:12 AM
I have finally got around to reading the Song of Ice and Fire series (a little late I know). One week after starting am already on the fourth book, needless to say I have been going to work very tired and weary eyed.

Am absolutely loving it though I think he has gone to the opposite extreme of Jordan and almost killed too many characters. I feel Jordan never killed enough while at the rate Martin is going the ending will be Shakespearan.

One least thing: please no spoilers past book three. Thanks.

Crispin's Crispian
06-22-2011, 11:25 AM
Started Memory of Ice - so far I'm not as annoyed with it as I was with the first 2 books of the series. We'll see how it pans out.:D Yay!

a very weird combination to that is The Land of Painted Caves - rather unbelievable how much overlap there is in the flintknapping department between these 2 books. bizarre combination, and very funny to think that Erikson might have stolen something from Auel :DWell keep in mind that Erikson was an archaeologist first, so he has some kind of affinity for flintknapping and potsherds. And that stuff is much more prevalent in MoI.
[/QUOTE]


I just finished The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho. Interesting quick read, though a bit heavy-handed in the mystical department. But I guess that's the idea. Lots of cool quotes, though, and good reminders of things I need to apply in my own life.

I just started Anansi Boys by Neil Gaiman on recommendation from a friend. I read American Gods already, so this should be a nice continuation. I heard there making American Gods into an HBO series. That actually sounds awesome.

Terez
06-22-2011, 12:51 PM
I didn't like Anansi Boys so much as American Gods. The scope was much smaller, and the scope was the main thing I liked about AG.

I'm reading Chopin books. Tons of them. Writing a book; it will be good, if it doesn't suck.

sandoz12
06-22-2011, 01:44 PM
I didn't like Anansi Boys so much as American Gods. The scope was much smaller, and the scope was the main thing I liked about AG.

I loved American Gods - would be one of my favourite books yet for some reason just couldn't get into Anansi Boys maybe I will give it another try sometime.

yks 6nnetu hing
06-22-2011, 01:49 PM
:D Yay!

Well keep in mind that Erikson was an archaeologist first, so he has some kind of affinity for flintknapping and potsherds. And that stuff is much more prevalent in MoI. Ah, didn't know that, explains a lot of his historiographical remarks. Anyways, I'm now a bit more than halfway through (it's my commute-book, I read maybe 40 pages a day of it, less if it's raining). I'm still a bit miffed at how great he thinks he is. I mean, seriously, Bernard Cornwell - best known for writing young adult male-oriented stuff such as Sharpe series - is loads better at action, gore and humour. Have I SEEN a scene where the enemy's intestines spill in the mud like large glistening earthworms, writhing as he draws his last breaths? no, I don't think I have. There's lots of blood and gore but it's so... eh... half-hearted. yay that Tattersail's back though. sort of.


I just finished The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho. Interesting quick read, though a bit heavy-handed in the mystical department. But I guess that's the idea. Lots of cool quotes, though, and good reminders of things I need to apply in my own life. out of curiosity, have you read any other Mystical Realists? like Marquez or Hesse?

Aside from Memories of Ice, I'm now reading a collection of articles by Gladwell, called "What the Dog saw", some interesting bits about marketing and first impressions.

Crispin's Crispian
06-22-2011, 03:45 PM
I'm still a bit miffed at how great he thinks he is. I mean, seriously, Bernard Cornwell - best known for writing young adult male-oriented stuff such as Sharpe series - is loads better at action, gore and humour. Have I SEEN a scene where the enemy's intestines spill in the mud like large glistening earthworms, writhing as he draws his last breaths? no, I don't think I have. There's lots of blood and gore but it's so... eh... half-hearted. yay that Tattersail's back though. sort of.
I don't really go for the blood and gore. It has its place as a device, but some authors overdo it for the sake of being...edgy? Erikson does sometimes come off as pretentious, I'll agree, but he hits the mark more often than he misses.

out of curiosity, have you read any other Mystical Realists? like Marquez or Hesse?


I haven't... Well, I read some short stories by Marquez in college, but since they were in Spanish I'm quite sure I didn't get enough out of them other than appreciating the motifs.

I guess what I meant about The Alchemist is that every sentence is a lesson in one way or another. I gets a little annoying.

yks 6nnetu hing
06-22-2011, 03:57 PM
I don't really go for the blood and gore. It has its place as a device, but some authors overdo it for the sake of being...edgy? Erikson does sometimes come off as pretentious, I'll agree, but he hits the mark more often than he misses.

see, normally, neither do I. It has to be well done or not done at all. Jordan for example saves the truly gory stuff for very momentous moments, and even then it's more about the emotional or symbolic than the physical. It has to mean something. Erikson is mediocre at it and it's non-stop... Still though, I'm starting to like the storyline and the mystical elements now, although I still think he's relying much too heavily on Deus Ex Machina crutches. Then again, anything goes in Fantasy.

I haven't... Well, I read some short stories by Marquez in college, but since they were in Spanish I'm quite sure I didn't get enough out of them other than appreciating the motifs.

I guess what I meant about The Alchemist is that every sentence is a lesson in one way or another. I gets a little annoying.
hehe, that's my experience too. he gets way preachy. But, if you liked Alchemist, I think you might like Herman Hesse's Siddhartha or Alessandro Baricco's Silk (I haven't seen the movie so I don't know if it did the book justice. frankly I doubt it considering that the book is barely a hundred pages long). They're not as preachy, quite short novels, I also found them more layered, deeper than Coelho's stuff.

Khoram
06-22-2011, 04:31 PM
I'm reading Chopin books. Tons of them. Writing a book; it will be good, if it doesn't suck.

As is with most books, methinks.


I'm currently reading The Hound of the Baskervilles. Always loved Sherlock Holmes. :D

Madgod
06-22-2011, 07:19 PM
Does watching a movie of Hamlet count?
In terms of more . . . solid books, I'm currently reading both Knight of Knives by Ian Esselmont and Otherland by Tad Williams, and starting my re-read of WoT. Try keeping all of those straight in your head.
And Khoram, yeah, Hound of the Baskervilles was actually my favorite book as a kid. Just the right mix of scary while actually being interesting. Now I'm gonna have to dig that up wherever I have it hidden.

Terez
06-22-2011, 08:58 PM
As part of my Chopin research, reading the letters of Abélard and Heloise. Good stuff.

Ishara
06-22-2011, 09:47 PM
:D Yay!

Well keep in mind that Erikson was an archaeologist first, so he has some kind of affinity for flintknapping and potsherds. And that stuff is much more prevalent in MoI.



I just finished The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho. Interesting quick read, though a bit heavy-handed in the mystical department. But I guess that's the idea. Lots of cool quotes, though, and good reminders of things I need to apply in my own life.

I just started Anansi Boys by Neil Gaiman on recommendation from a friend. I read American Gods already, so this should be a nice continuation. I heard there making American Gods into an HBO series. That actually sounds awesome.[/QUOTE]

Ugh. Hated the Alchemist. Preachy was the perfect word.

But Marquez...oh, I loved, loved loved One Hundred Years of Solitude. Love in the Time of Cholera as well.

I don't think I've read American Gods, but really liked Anansi Boys, so I guess it's on the list now?

Am now Reading Furious Love (the Liz Taylor/ Richard Burton biography) - it's fascinating. And an interesting counterpoint to the letters of Abélard and Heloise. ;) Ooh, and just finished the Percy Jackson series, which was quite good actually.

I'd really like to read Les Miserables, given that I love Hugo, but it's so big and unwieldy I'm tempted to get an eReader for that alone!

Terez
06-22-2011, 09:50 PM
Am now Reading Furious Love (the Liz Taylor/ Richard Burton biography) - it's fascinating. And an interesting counterpoint to the letters of Abélard and Heloise. ;)
Lol. Not sure what the connection is, but this quote is downright trippy:

Never, God knows, did I seek anything in you except yourself; I wanted only you, nothing of yours. I looked for no marriage-bond, no marriage portion, and it was not my own pleasures and wishes I sought to gratify, as you well know, but yours. The name of wife may seem more sacred or more worthy but sweeter to me will always be the word lover, or, if you will permit me, that of concubine or whore. I believed that the more I humbled myself on your account, the more I would please you, and also the less damage I should do to the brightness of your reputation. You yourself did not altogether forget this in the letter of consolation I have spoken of which you wrote to a friend; there you recounted some of the reasons I gave in trying to dissuade you from binding us together in an ill-advised marriage. But you kept silent about most of my arguments for preferring love to wedlock and freedom to chains. God is my witness that if Augustus, Emperor of the whole world, thought fit to honour me with marriage and conferred all the earth on me to possess for ever, it would be dearer and more honorable to me to be called not his Empress but your whore.
Especially as it relates to Chopin and his lover, whom he referred to as 'Abélard' sometimes when he was wroth. Or 'Count Ory'.

maacaroni
06-23-2011, 09:01 AM
The Last Kingdom by Bernard Cornwell for me. I finished mistborn, it was alright, nowt special, though...the word I would use is 'earnest'.

I have a soft spot for his writing, I agree with earlier posters thoughts on his action writing...he could teach Erikson a few tricks.

And regarding Erikson, am I the only one who had a crossroads of twilight moment after TCG?

I thought 'is that it?'

No big reveal, no big justification for anyone's actions, no nothing.

Terez
06-23-2011, 09:08 AM
I didn't read the last two Malazan books yet, but I never expected anything close to a traditional ending for those books.

Crispin's Crispian
06-23-2011, 12:25 PM
Does watching a movie of Hamlet count?
In terms of more . . . solid books, I'm currently reading both Knight of Knives by Ian Esselmont and Otherland by Tad Williams, and starting my re-read of WoT. Try keeping all of those straight in your head.
Night of Knives is an easy, fun read if you like Malazan stuff.

Otherland...where's Bela? I read the entire series several years ago. For the most part, I liked it, but found the middle books to be quite a slog. When you finish the last one, come back and we can discuss the ending. :)

And regarding Erikson, am I the only one who had a crossroads of twilight moment after TCG?

I thought 'is that it?'

No big reveal, no big justification for anyone's actions, no nothing.


Probably shouldn't say too much right here. There is a thread about TCG elsewhere in the forum with spoilers. I will say that I disagree somewhat with your "no big justification," and also that the revelations were carefully doled out. Yes, not everything was explained, but I'm putting my faith in the upcoming ancillary novels about Karsa and the Tiste Andii.

Terez
06-23-2011, 12:34 PM
Night of Knives is an easy, fun read if you like Malazan stuff.
Easy read, yes. Fun? Not so much.

maacaroni
06-27-2011, 06:39 AM
Night of Knives felt like what it was, a first novel.

As for the last two books, Terez, it is pretty standard practice to have the big reveal after ten books. I understand that SE does not like to conform to normal literary tropes, however, to not do this felt like he was going down the 'literary' trap: art for the sake of art - f*ck the plot.

I'll give ICE his due, he explains where SE intimates. Of course, SE is the better writer.

Madgod
06-27-2011, 08:58 AM
Otherland...where's Bela? I read the entire series several years ago. For the most part, I liked it, but found the middle books to be quite a slog. When you finish the last one, come back and we can discuss the ending. :)


I got a couple chapters in Otherland, but it had to be returned to the library. I thought about renewing it, but I'm not going to have library access for 3 weeks, and it would be due in 2. So, it's going to have to be restarted in a couple of weeks I guess.

Finished Knight of Knives, and thought it was ok. I personally preferred Steven Erikson's work, and didn't really have any problems with the last two books. While things weren't like a traditional epic fantasy series in the ending, it made for an interesting read.

Terez
06-27-2011, 11:41 AM
Night of Knives felt like what it was, a first novel.
Several people said RotCG was worse.

As for the last two books, Terez, it is pretty standard practice to have the big reveal after ten books. I understand that SE does not like to conform to normal literary tropes, however, to not do this felt like he was going down the 'literary' trap: art for the sake of art - f*ck the plot.
I agree he took it a little too far in some aspects. One person on Malazan got pissy with me when I suggested that his main goal in writing the series was to do something non-traditional, but I can't help but see it that way.

Crispin's Crispian
06-27-2011, 01:19 PM
Night of Knives felt like what it was, a first novel.I liked it, actually. I thought it was better than RotCG, but probably just because it was self-contained and short. There wasn't much room for scope creep, which is what RotCG felt like.

As for the last two books, Terez, it is pretty standard practice to have the big reveal after ten books. I understand that SE does not like to conform to normal literary tropes, however, to not do this felt like he was going down the 'literary' trap: art for the sake of art - f*ck the plot.
I don't understand what big reveal you were expecting. He didn't explain every detail, but that was never really going to happen. The final scenes were pretty epic and final, but there weren't any major plot twists to be had. Is that all it is--you were expecting a "holy shit now I understand it all!" moment?

maacaroni
06-28-2011, 05:17 AM
Is that all it is--you were expecting a "holy shit now I understand it all!" moment?

Er yes.

Or at least the majority of it.

I think it is ever-so-slightly infuriating to read ten books (plus three outriders) and be none-the-wiser as to what the point was in the series. Sure, I have some inkling, but beyond that I have no definitive idea as to what the point of the story arc is. When people are mass-debating (see what I did there?)the meaning of not minor nuances but major plot elements, you have to ask whether he is as good a writer as we all think?

I do not think it is too much of a stretch to have at least a partial reveal after ten bleedin books!

Terez
06-28-2011, 12:58 PM
Malazan has always been more like an extended RPG than a true story.

Davian93
06-28-2011, 01:40 PM
I could never get into Malazan and these comments are making me wonder if I should even bother. I do own the first 3 books of the series but I've never gotten more than 200 pages into GotM before losing interest/getting sidetracked with something else.

Maybe, just maybe I'll sit down and force myself to slog through it but I just have so many other books I could read at this point.

I am really looking forward to Dance which is finally coming out in a week or so. I look forward to buying that the day it comes out and taking it with me on vacation to Maine as my vacation book. AFter that, it will be books 2 & 3 of the Hunger Games and then maybe I'll glance at Malazan again.

Terez
06-28-2011, 01:57 PM
Erikson is a really fantastic writer, and I think he starts to hit his peak of awesomeness with books 7 and 8. But that's also where the details started to disappear from my brain (6 was a new book when I started), so I had to quit pending reread. I can't vouch for the story as a whole, but he does tell good stories within each book that are each worth reading as a standalone (in fact, some of them like book 5 just really don't require you to read the other books at all).

Crispin's Crispian
06-28-2011, 05:16 PM
Hmm. I'd say the final book is itself the reveal about the whole plot.


The point of the story is compassion, and how so many of the gods were working together to free the Crippled God despite his apparent evil.

The point is also sacrifice, which you're hit over the head with in Books 9 and 10. The whole "unwitnessed" thing, which admittedly wasn't fleshed out enough, speaks to doing your duty and being compassionate in the face of your own doom.

Then there are a bunch of other smaller things.

Truth be told, I wasn't all that happy with the ending as it was explained either, but I did get the point. I just think some explanation of how everyone knew what was going on (Tavore in particular) would have been good.


I think he starts to hit his peak of awesomeness with books 7 and 8Hmm. I found book 8 to be really boring, except for the last quarter or so. I don't really remember book 7, but I think it was slightly more exciting.

I actually thought Books 2,3, and 5 were the best by far. A lot of people didn't like 5 because of the departure, but I thought it was very well done. And I hated book 2, but every time I go back to read it I'm stunned at how good much I enjoy it.

sandoz12
06-29-2011, 12:29 AM
I am really looking forward to Dance which is finally coming out in a week or so. I look forward to buying that the day it comes out and taking it with me on vacation to Maine as my vacation book.

I'm looking forward to it too. Did you hear how Amazon Germany fucked up and sent a few hundred copies out early? So right now some people are already reading it.

Terez
06-29-2011, 12:49 AM
Hmm. I found book 8 to be really boring, except for the last quarter or so. I don't really remember book 7, but I think it was slightly more exciting.
Goddammit, I had to blindly delete all those spoilers when replying. Anyway. I was talking about pure prose; I can definitely see why some would have a hard time reading book 8; some parts were unbelievably boring, up until the awesome ending. What I enjoyed about the book as a whole was the narration aspect, which helped (in my mind) to propel things along even when they were boring. If he hadn't done so much random philosophizing...well, some of that was good too, but mostly it was boring and depressing. But I tend to think that's because of his frame of mind when he was writing the book.

Madgod
06-29-2011, 07:05 PM
I really enjoyed Toll the Hounds,through my first read-through it was one of my favorite books in the series. I'll see if that holds up when I eventually do a re-read.
While Dance does look like an interesting book, since I figure that I'll have another 5 years to read it, I don't need to get it as soon as it comes out.

Davian93
06-30-2011, 11:13 AM
So, I picked up Catching Fire yesterday when I was playing hooky from work, ahem, Sick, yes I was sick. ~cough, cough~. I certainly did not wake up to a beautiful early summer day and call out so my fiancee and I could go out for the day shopping/exploring central & southern Vermont. That would be irresponsible. So, we went out early for breakfast around 9 am (way later than my typical 6 am work arrival time though), went shopping in several quaint VT towns and in one small VT bookshop, I bit the bullet and bought Catching Fire for the full cover price of $17.99 (ouch). I'm about 75 pages into it so far and its easily the equal of Book 1. Other than the high praise on the back cover from Stephanie Meyer, its a fun little read.

I also found a hardcover copy of the Barbara Tuchman classic August 1914 at a used book store for $2...just had to snatch that up too. Haven't read it in years but I've always loved all of Tuchman's histories...great historian that is somewhat forgotten these days. Especially if you are a big WWI history guy like myself. My fiancee saw me reading Castles of Steel by Massie a couple days ago and just rolled her eyes after reading over my shoulder for a couple minutes. She simply cannot get why I find it all so fascinating.

On a side note, if you ever decide to travel to Vermont and want some pointers on great places to go, feel free to hit me up on the non-Wot board or by PMing me. There are lots of hidden gems in the state and we have a TON of great artists if you are in the market for good, even affordable artwork. I'm looking at getting a couple oil paintings for my house right now along with a really nice sculpture (I'm distant friends with a local sculpture who does fantastic work in soapstone, alabaster and even granite but has very affordable prices. She even does commissioned pieces on occasion at a very reasonable rate). Original artwork is so much nicer than getting the same model home crap prints that everyone else has from Ikea or Kohls.

Yes, I go on tangents occasoinally.

Ishara
06-30-2011, 11:20 AM
So, I picked up Catching Fire yesterday when I was playing hooky from work, ahem, Sick, yes I was sick. ~cough, cough~. I certainly did not wake up to a beautiful early summer day and call out so my fiancee and I could go out for the day shopping/exploring central & southern Vermont. That would be irresponsible. So, we went out early for breakfast around 9 am (way later than my typical 6 am work arrival time though), went shopping in several quaint VT towns and in one small VT bookshop, I bit the bullet and bought Catching Fire for the full cover price of $17.99 (ouch). I'm about 75 pages into it so far and its easily the equal of Book 1. Other than the high praise on the back cover from Stephanie Meyer, its a fun little read.



LOL - I know, right? Not even on the same stratosphere as Meyer. Glad you're enjoying it. Finnick is one my all-time favourite characters in that series. Love him oh so much. But if I could provide you with a small piece of advice? I'd buy book 3 before you finish Catching Fire. You'll be pissed if you don't.

Davian93
06-30-2011, 11:24 AM
LOL - I know, right? Not ven on the same stratosphere as Meyer. Glad you're enjoying it. Finnick is one my all-time favourite characters in that series. Love him oh so much. But if I could provide you with a small piece of advice? I'd buy book 3 before you finish Catching Fire. You'll be pissed if you don't.

I take it that the book ends on a major cliffhanger or something?

Ishara
06-30-2011, 11:39 AM
I take it that the book ends on a major cliffhanger or something?

Maybe...

Weiramon
07-03-2011, 12:27 AM
What I've read recently:


Master & Commander

he should be court-martialed. If he can take a Spanish xebec-frigate, he can do more than surrender without firing a shot.

Best he be relegated to command a battery of rusty cannonades on an east indiaman. If he can't fight off a scurvy privateer, he can dress in bloomers and hide among the passengers.

maacaroni
07-05-2011, 05:36 AM
scurvy privateer

Of course, by privateer, you mean American.

:)

Davian93
07-05-2011, 09:57 AM
LOL - I know, right? Not even on the same stratosphere as Meyer. Glad you're enjoying it. Finnick is one my all-time favourite characters in that series. Love him oh so much. But if I could provide you with a small piece of advice? I'd buy book 3 before you finish Catching Fire. You'll be pissed if you don't.

So...SPOILERS from finishing Books 2 & 3...















It was a bit of a surprise to see Finnick die to say the least. I thought he'd survive. Prim was a bit rough too but I kinda figured that was gonna happen for some sick reason. Gale is a huge POS and I dont get any of the attraction between Katniss and him. He's pretty much a really evil bad guy when you get down to it. Overall, I felt Book 2 dragged a bit and I was a bit disappointed that they went back to the Arena but it worked out in the end. The "District 13 is just as bad as the Capitol" plotline wasn't a surprise and, if anything, they seemed worse than the Capitol with their complete Nazistic regimentation and militarized society. Good for Katniss to deal with that little problem.

Overall, solid trilogy.

Weiramon
07-05-2011, 03:33 PM
Of course, by privateer, you mean American.

:)

If there are any doubts, "scurvy" should allay them.




Although the Bellone was French. Not to be confused with the Bellone in The Mauritius Command, also French.

yks 6nnetu hing
07-06-2011, 09:16 AM
for Malazan... it waxes and wanes. I think the most frustrating thing about it is summed up in a blog post (http://www.dianagabaldon.com/2010/12/jamie-and-the-rule-of-three/) by Diana Gabaldon:
Almost everybody understands that you have to have _something_ at stake for a story to be good. And way too many thrillers and sf/f novels assume that nothing less than the Fate of the Known Universe will do {g}, these authors mistaking scale for intensity. No matter what the background may be, a story that focuses on the impact of events on one or two individual _lives_ will be–generally speaking–much more engaging and emotionally intense than one where everyone is just rushing around trying to save a planet or get their hands on the fortunium bomb that could Destroy Everything!!

*that* is one of the main reasons why the Da Vinci Code was horrible, why the later books of Auel tended to suck (and not in the good way), why McCaffrey and Asimov books are still really nice to read even though it's been 40 years or more since they were first published and some/most of the social commentary no longer applies, that's why Ender's Game was AWESOME but the follow-ups... not so much and that's why RJ is the king of all Good Stuff.

Sure, worldbuilding is really important and you've got to have a strong plotline. But if the reader doesn't care about the characters, the whole excercise is pointless. Might as well write statistics.

GonzoTheGreat
07-06-2011, 09:21 AM
Might as well write statistics.On average, that doesn't make very good reading, I've noticed.

Weiramon
07-06-2011, 03:24 PM
On average, that doesn't make very good reading, I've noticed.

You don't really mean that.

Ishara
07-06-2011, 08:33 PM
So...SPOILERS from finishing Books 2 & 3...















It was a bit of a surprise to see Finnick die to say the least. I thought he'd survive. Prim was a bit rough too but I kinda figured that was gonna happen for some sick reason. Gale is a huge POS and I dont get any of the attraction between Katniss and him. He's pretty much a really evil bad guy when you get down to it. Overall, I felt Book 2 dragged a bit and I was a bit disappointed that they went back to the Arena but it worked out in the end. The "District 13 is just as bad as the Capitol" plotline wasn't a surprise and, if anything, they seemed worse than the Capitol with their complete Nazistic regimentation and militarized society. Good for Katniss to deal with that little problem.

Overall, solid trilogy.

Am happy you liked it. I thought the ending was very brave of Collins. It didn't end the way I wanted it to, and it didn't necessarily end on a positive note. Actually, I recall being so numbed out and drained of emotion from being SO upset that I actually needed some good alone time after finishing. I hated the seemingly unending Katniss feeling sorry for herself portion of the book after Prim's death. And will be honest and say that Catching Fire was my favourite out of all 3 of them. Going back into the arena the way they did with the intrigue and ending was phenomenal for me. I was always, always, always on Team Peeta. Gale - he just wasn't that guy for me. But Finnick, oh boy! LOL

What do you think of the casting now? I'm SOOO excited to see the movies (because it seems as if (unlike Meyer) having Collins' involved will be akin to Jo Rowling being involved in the HP movies - elevates them. But the casting of the boys is making me supremely nervous.

Davian93
07-06-2011, 08:41 PM
Am happy you liked it. I thought the ending was very brave of Collins. It didn't end the way I wanted it to, and it didn't necessarily end on a positive note. Actually, I recall being so numbed out and drained of emotion from being SO upset that I actually needed some good alone time after finishing. I hated the seemingly unending Katniss feeling sorry for herself portion of the book after Prim's death. And will be honest and say that Catching Fire was my favourite out of all 3 of them. Going back into the arena the way they did with the intrigue and ending was phenomenal for me. I was always, always, always on Team Peeta. Gale - he just wasn't that guy for me. But Finnick, oh boy! LOL

What do you think of the casting now? I'm SOOO excited to see the movies (because it seems as if (unlike Meyer) having Collins' involved will be akin to Jo Rowling being involved in the HP movies - elevates them. But the casting of the boys is making me supremely nervous.


For me, the ending of the books is what took it from moderately good YA sci-fi to "Wow, that was really well written". Collins didn't wimp out with the mega super happy ending and I really respect that.

I agree on Peeta over Gale...Gale was a prick from the start. He showed his true evil as the books went on.

Personally, I think Coin was the biggest villain of the books. At least Snow was honest about his evilness. Coin was a complete hypocrite. Picking a side between the Capitol and District 13 would be like picking Nazi Germany or Stalin's USSR.


As for the casting, I have no idea. I've never really seen any of the things all 3 have been in. The girl wasn't exactly how I pictured Katniss but she seems like a good young actress so there's that.

Ishara
07-07-2011, 09:27 AM
I agree about the ending, and was happy that the older version of Katniss really did have a hard time imagining herself with children, and couldn't ever really let go of the past. Her ending was what elevated it and one of the reasons I can wholeheartedly recommend the trilogy to everyone and anyone I know.

I thought Coin was deliciously evil. Very single-minded and scary. I actually liked the conversation that Katniss had with Snow. It didn't humanize him per se, but it did prove that he at least was self-aware of his own monstrosity. I do have to admit to still being squicked out by the smell of roses though. Poor, poor Finnick...

Davian93
07-07-2011, 12:34 PM
Killing off Finnick was just evil...Booo to Suzanne Collins for doing it...BOOOOO!!!!

But it was a well written scene and it fit with the ending.

Coin was one of those people that thinks they are justified to be evil because "The other guy is too!" Its okay to bomb civilians and children simply because "Snow is evil". Yeah lady, you're the one deliberately targeting civilians and little kids but its the other guy that's bad...riggghhttt. She's basically going with the Shadar Logoth approach to attacking evil. I absolutely despise that type of approach. I can at least respect Snow because he was open about it. Yeah, I'm a bad guy...deal with it. Instead of putting down rebellions repeatedly, he used a brutal tribute system that kept the districts in line. Brutal and efficient...and it kept the level of bloodshed down overall. Granted, he's no Brandin but he's at least open about what he is and does.

The epilogue made the book for me...great look at the older Katniss and the actual lasting effects of the Hunger Games on her and Peeta.

jana
07-10-2011, 10:02 PM
Theoryland

sandoz12
07-11-2011, 01:42 AM
Hopefully will be reading Dance with Dragons in about 5 hours time. Depends on whether Amazon will release it to me at midnight NZ time or midnight California time - a small matter of 19 hours difference.

I don't suppose anyone knows how this works? Did anyone perhaps buy the Kindle version of ToM in a non-Californian timezone?

WinespringBrother
07-11-2011, 10:17 AM
Hopefully will be reading Dance with Dragons in about 5 hours time. Depends on whether Amazon will release it to me at midnight NZ time or midnight California time - a small matter of 19 hours difference.

I don't suppose anyone knows how this works? Did anyone perhaps buy the Kindle version of ToM in a non-Californian timezone?

I bought the TofM prologue and I think I was able to download it before midnight PST.

Good luck!

Jonai
07-11-2011, 10:27 AM
I'll get Dance whenever 2 days shipping gets in onto my doorstep. It's a pity I'm only on book 2 of my reread. Still trying to decide If I be a good boy and finish the reread, or tell reading comprehension to go to hell. haha

Davian93
07-11-2011, 10:38 AM
I'm gonna buy it at lunch tomorrow...and maybe start reading it tomorrow night.

sandoz12
07-11-2011, 05:17 PM
Looks like I am going to have await awhile. Just after 10am NZ time and still not on my Kindle. So guess I am going to have to wait to midnight California time.

Oh well I guess patience is a virtue. Just a shame as I have today off work while am working for the rest of the week.

sandoz12
07-14-2011, 04:59 PM
Well I have got just over 10% of the way into ADWD and so far are feeling very under whelmed. Hopefully will improve as at the moment it is feeling more like AFFC than SoS.

Saw the other thread but didn't want to head in there and get spoiled.

Khoram
07-14-2011, 07:46 PM
So after what, 3 months? I have finally finished Sword of Shannara for the 2nd time, and I figured I'd continue on to the Elfstones of Shannara - I'm about halfway done that one. Maybe I'll continue the series, or continue my WoT reread.

Res_Ipsa
07-15-2011, 02:37 AM
So after what, 3 months? I have finally finished Sword of Shannara for the 2nd time, and I figured I'd continue on to the Elfstones of Shannara - I'm about halfway done that one. Maybe I'll continue the series, or continue my WoT reread.

If its your cup of tea that is fine but I got tired of the whole series when I realized (at least to me) he just kept rehashing the plot. Feel free to educate me beyond the first few books because that is all I stayed for.

Davian93
07-15-2011, 07:35 AM
If its your cup of tea that is fine but I got tired of the whole series when I realized (at least to me) he just kept rehashing the plot. Feel free to educate me beyond the first few books because that is all I stayed for.

I dont mind Shannara...What I do mind is how Tolkien stole all of it for his pathetically derivative so-called Lord of the Rings.

Ishara
07-15-2011, 07:42 AM
LOL

ChubbyAiel
07-15-2011, 07:59 AM
I'm rereading The Dragonbone Chair by Tad Williams. I read it a few years ago but can't remember too much about it. Thought I'd give it another go and then read the rest of Memory, Sorrow and Thorn, which I never got round to the first time.

yks 6nnetu hing
07-26-2011, 03:40 AM
I've finished Memory of Ice.

and I don't think I'll be going back to that Malazan pile of crap any time soon. The book was fairly ok until about the last 40 pages when Ericson managed to remind me exactly why I found the Deadhouse Gates so despicable. Hint: everybody dies but there are about 168 deus ex machina moments tightly compressed into 5 sentences.

It is Fantasy that I'm reading so I normally don't mind so much the things that have to do with timelines or magic structure or whatnot: it's magical, after all. but seriously, there is a difference between (seemingly) out of the blue events because it's all "magic" (a la Harry Potter) and the author having no idea what to do next so he'll just kill off everybody and then resurrect them all, and oh by the way, there's a blue leprechaun in your pocket. While all the while pretending to be Teh Bestest Writtur Of All Time. Of All Tiem!

Davian93
07-26-2011, 08:05 AM
Deus Ex Machina was the main character of Harry Potter...though they were very well written for childrens/young adult books so I dont mind it.

The comments make me not want to even bother with Erickson.

yks 6nnetu hing
07-26-2011, 08:43 AM
Deus Ex Machina was the main character of Harry Potter...though they were very well written for childrens/young adult books so I dont mind it.

The comments make me not want to even bother with Erickson.

Eh. The writing style is highly personal. I just happen to get a violent reaction to his particular style. I know of plenty of people who don't mind at all and even like his style. So that particular comment you can take with a large grain of salt.

as for deus ex machina devices, as said, I really don't mind as long as the story itself is coherent and the author obviously knows where she/he is going with the whole thing. And would be very nice if these devices wouldn't repeat almost verbatim from book to book. I mean... is that really that much to ask?

Ishara
07-26-2011, 09:34 AM
Deus Ex Machina was the main character of Harry Potter...though they were very well written for childrens/young adult books so I dont mind it.


I completely disagree!

Sarevok
07-26-2011, 10:20 AM
The comments make me not want to even bother with Erickson.
I believe the Malazan books are a case of "love it or hate it". There isn't really much middle ground.

Deus Ex Machina was the main character of Harry Potter...though they were very well written for childrens/young adult books so I dont mind it.

I completely disagree!
With the Deus Ex Machina part, or the not-minding part of his statement?

Davian93
07-26-2011, 12:15 PM
I completely disagree!

To which part. I mean, I really like the HP books but Rowling definitely did use it fairly often...though it was more of a "You weren't aware of this type of magic as a student/child" type of method. It was always coherrent though.

In Deathly Hallows, there were a few of them that were borderline including but not limited to:

1. Ron saving Harry in the pond out of nowhere.
2. Dumbledore's brother saving them in the basement of the Malfoy mansion

Ishara
07-26-2011, 12:35 PM
See, I knew you'd bring up both of those examples, and they were clearly explained, with pre-established concepts.

Deus ex machina is a plot device whereby a seemingly inextricable problem is suddenly and abruptly solved with the contrived and unexpected intervention of some new event, character, ability, or object.

1. Ron saving Harry in the pond out of nowhere.
Ron was provided the Deluminator at the beginning, and the Delumintor has been established almost since the first page of the series. Now admitedly, the "carry a light within you" function was new, but reasonably explained. The fact that Ron had been following them and shouting for them had also been explained earlier in the book.

2. Dumbledore's brother saving them in the basement of the Malfoy mansion.
The concept of the mirror had been pre-established since book three, as well as the function. That Aberforth had the other mirror is no surprise either. I don't see this one as fitting either.

Davian93
07-26-2011, 01:19 PM
That Aberforth had the other mirror is no surprise either.

Why? Mundungus could have sold it to anyone...its a pretty far fetched bet that he sold it to Aberforth of all people and that Aberforth had access to send Dobby to help immediately.

I mean, yeah you could use that it doesnt violate the rules of the universe and isn't technically Deus Ex Machina (definitely not at the level of Terry Goodkind anyway) but its pushing it.

The Unreasoner
07-26-2011, 01:50 PM
Rereading Fools Die by Mario Puzo, one of my favorites.
Main character is an author, and he mentally deconstructs situations and dramatizes scenarios. A lot of cool lines of thought. Interesting storylines too. Mostly about corruption, the war of the sexes, and fate/design.

sandoz12
07-27-2011, 02:20 AM
Rereading Fools Die by Mario Puzo, one of my favorites.
Main character is an author, and he mentally deconstructs situations and dramatizes scenarios. A lot of cool lines of thought. Interesting storylines too. Mostly about corruption, the war of the sexes, and fate/design.

I love Fools Die. Read it twice and it's a great book. The Sicilian and The Godfather are also great by Mario Puzo. Yet Omerta and The Family are both absolutely terrible - though they were both published after his death and I have a suspicion were not actually written by him as they are so bad.

Sarevok
07-27-2011, 03:55 AM
Why? Mundungus could have sold it to anyone...its a pretty far fetched bet that he sold it to Aberforth of all people and that Aberforth had access to send Dobby to help immediately.
Was it ever stated he bought it off Mundungus? Couldn't it be he confiscated it once he recognized it for what it was? The Boar's Head would be one of the places he'd go to try and sell it.

The Unreasoner
07-27-2011, 05:39 PM
I love Fools Die. Read it twice and it's a great book. The Sicilian and The Godfather are also great by Mario Puzo. Yet Omerta and The Family are both absolutely terrible - though they were both published after his death and I have a suspicion were not actually written by him as they are so bad.

Excellent book. Cully was my favorite character, I was pissed at Gronevelt at the end. He must have paid off that judge.

But still, almost a perfect ending. "You can't beat the percentages"

sandoz12
07-27-2011, 06:12 PM
Excellent book. Cully was my favorite character, I was pissed at Gronevelt at the end. He must have paid off that judge.

But still, almost a perfect ending. "You can't beat the percentages"

Exactly. I think that was the whole point in Gronevelt paying off the judge. Cully took a gamble against the percentages and lost. As a keen poker player (any Americans on here can you please tell your President to give my money back) I really appreciate this moral.

My favourite character was actually Merlyn. The one part of the book I didn't appreciate so much was his whole Hollywood sojourn as it was obvious he was going to get fucked over and never really got into his relationship with that bisexual chick - almost felt like filler to me.

The Unreasoner
07-27-2011, 06:21 PM
I loved Merlyn. Who couldn't? I mean, all of those little dramatizations he does, the way he sees things-very thought provoking. But his character is kind of, as several of the characters say: a son of a bitch. Gronevelt I liked too. Those were probably my top three, the three survivors of the Baccarat showdown.

Which President owes you money? (and more interestingly, for what?)

The Unreasoner
07-27-2011, 06:24 PM
A book I had to buy used was Puzo's Inside Las Vegas. Non-fiction, fascinating stuff. Not sure it's printed anymore though.

sandoz12
07-27-2011, 06:33 PM
Which President owes you money? (and more interestingly, for what?)

Obama (though it probably not directly his fault but since he in charge I still blame him). I played on a US based site poker site and had several hundred dollars on it. The feds shut the site down and seized all funds including from international players such as myself who were not committing any illegal activity (online gambling is perfectly legal in New Zealand like most western countries) - the site has pleaded for players such as myself to have their money returned but govt. has refused to cooperate. And so now I am several hundred dollars out of pocket. I had heard the US Govt. was short of money but didn't think they would stoop to stealing foreigners money.

sandoz12
07-27-2011, 06:37 PM
A book I had to buy used was Puzo's Inside Las Vegas. Non-fiction, fascinating stuff. Not sure it's printed anymore though.

That sounds really cool - I should try to track down a copy if I can.

Amazon have copies so that may well be one of my next book purchases.

Davian93
07-28-2011, 07:51 AM
Obama (though it probably not directly his fault but since he in charge I still blame him). I played on a US based site poker site and had several hundred dollars on it. The feds shut the site down and seized all funds including from international players such as myself who were not committing any illegal activity (online gambling is perfectly legal in New Zealand like most western countries) - the site has pleaded for players such as myself to have their money returned but govt. has refused to cooperate. And so now I am several hundred dollars out of pocket. I had heard the US Govt. was short of money but didn't think they would stoop to stealing foreigners money.


Imperialism FTW!!!

The Unreasoner
08-06-2011, 09:25 PM
Mark Winegardner got the rights to continue the Godfather saga. I don't think he has the chops. The Godfather Returns felt like some fan-fiction shit. But I never read the Godfather's Revenge, so I may be being unfair. Sandoz, you ever read it?

Zanguini
08-07-2011, 03:09 AM
Currently I am reading

Dresden Files Grave Peril
On my way through to get to Ghost Story

and
Star Trek Titan: Orion's Hounds
Its a typical Star Trek book. The Titan series follows Captain Riker on his first command.

and
Star Trek: New Frontier Requiem
Which is from the best series of Star Trek books about halfway though the to the end of the series.

and
The Great War: A Walk Through Hell
This is a Turtledove series in which WWI is fought, had the South won the Civil War. Actually I am not reading this on yet as I dont have it but I know where copies are I just havnt had the time to go and get them.

Zanguini
08-07-2011, 03:16 AM
Bush Jr Owes me money. One I saved his sorry ass from a Severe Thunderstorm when he was about to land in Paris.(in the process making the French look silly) and the guy sent me to Afghanistan for my trouble where I participated in Opperation Anaconda I never did get hazarous duty pay nor did I get Combat pay though my record of my time there clearly shows I fired my weapon in a combatlike situation.

GonzoTheGreat
08-07-2011, 03:57 AM
Bush Jr Owes me money. One I saved his sorry ass from a Severe Thunderstorm when he was about to land in Paris.(in the process making the French look silly) and the guy sent me to Afghanistan for my trouble where I participated in Opperation Anaconda I never did get hazarous duty pay nor did I get Combat pay though my record of my time there clearly shows I fired my weapon in a combatlike situation.You survived, so obviously you never were in any real danger. Further evidence: none of those who did not survive complain about being denied hazardous duty pay, do they?

Mort
08-07-2011, 06:46 AM
I never did get hazarous duty pay nor did I get Combat pay though my record of my time there clearly shows I fired my weapon in a combatlike situation.

Combatlike situation? Did a snake get into your tent or what? :D

Zanguini
08-07-2011, 11:17 PM
No I was walking from where they served meals to the Tower, with 3 others when this c130 takes off and taliban in a hill a ways away from the flightline starts shooting at the plane. From out of no where this Marine sgt runs up to us and orders us to shoot at the hill. So I do but the hill was at least a mile away... there was no chance of me hitting anything especially since i couldnt even see anyone ... and there was very little chance that they would be able to hit me... But I did fire my weapon at something other than a range target... I assume that means i am supposed to get combat pay

Sukoto
08-09-2011, 11:47 AM
I just finished reading GRRM's latest book, and now I'm back to the Malazan books. I'm on book 9, Dust of Dreams.

As fascinating as Erikson's world and characters are, I just don't care about the story that much. It's a bit too ADHD for me to love it.

Ishara
08-09-2011, 12:02 PM
Watching all 3 of Peter Jackson's vlogs on the making of The Hobbit, followed by obsessive linking to all th epics of the dwarves amde me need to re-read The Hobbit. It was awesome, in case you wondered.

The Unreasoner
08-12-2011, 05:24 PM
No I was walking from where they served meals to the Tower, with 3 others when this c130 takes off and taliban in a hill a ways away from the flightline starts shooting at the plane. From out of no where this Marine sgt runs up to us and orders us to shoot at the hill. So I do but the hill was at least a mile away... there was no chance of me hitting anything especially since i couldnt even see anyone ... and there was very little chance that they would be able to hit me... But I did fire my weapon at something other than a range target... I assume that means i am supposed to get combat pay

Wait this was in Paris? How was this not all over the news?

Ishara
08-12-2011, 06:13 PM
Just finished Night Watch by PTerry, and it was phenomenal. Easily the best of the entire series, for me anyways.

Kimon
08-12-2011, 08:30 PM
Just finished reading A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini. An excellent novel, if quite disturbing, especially considering that the happy ending is no longer looking so happy...

Birgitte
08-12-2011, 10:54 PM
Just finished Night Watch by PTerry, and it was phenomenal. Easily the best of the entire series, for me anyways.

It's one of my favorites too. :D I heart Vimes.

redhairedking
08-14-2011, 06:35 PM
Currently I am reading A Game of Thrones

sandoz12
08-19-2011, 07:19 PM
I'm currently reading Azincourt by Bernard Cornwell. Never read a book by him before despite seeing countless ones. Enjoying it so far - even though I know how it's going to end (unless it suddenly diverges into alternate history).

jason wolfbrother
08-20-2011, 06:59 AM
Slowly working my way through Dance of Dragons. Surprising how much I had forgotten from the previous 4 books, and even more surprising how much I had remembered. :cool:

sandoz12
08-23-2011, 02:43 AM
Am onto The Black Dahlia by James Ellroy. Pretty good so far. I loved American Tabloid which was written by the same author.

Figbiscuit
08-25-2011, 08:26 AM
I have nearly finished House of Chains, and can happily report that mostly it's meant as little to me as the first three books in the Malazan series. They really batter my head :confused: I shall persevere on tho...

And I heartily concurr Ishara, Night Watch is easily one of the best Discworld books he's written :cool:

maacaroni
08-25-2011, 08:42 AM
I'm currently reading Azincourt by Bernard Cornwell. Never read a book by him before despite seeing countless ones. Enjoying it so far - even though I know how it's going to end (unless it suddenly diverges into alternate history).

The French lose. Badly.

GonzoTheGreat
08-25-2011, 09:00 AM
The French lose. Badly.That's just a ruse. In reality, they're probably buying time, to regroup, so that eventually they will be able to throw the English off the Continent. Those French are sneaky, you know.

Figbiscuit
11-15-2011, 09:06 AM
*bump*

Is no-one reading anything at the moment then?

Recently I have read the following books (that I can remember, plus others that I can't, and some thrillers which I don't count...)

Feel free to make any comments you wish..

Snuff - Terry Pratchett
One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest (having only just watched the film for the first time)
Whit - Iain Banks
The Dark Side of the Sun - Terry Pratchett (I got let loose in Waterstones when Snuff was released...£53 later = happy Fig)
The Thousand Autums of Jacob de Zoet - David Mitchell
The Night Circus - Erin someone, maybe Morgenstein?


I also have waiting to be read:
KPax
Science of the Discworld II
Home - Bill Bryson
Excession - Iain M Banks (plus another one of his fiction novels which I can't just remember the name of)

and I'm currently reading another Iain M Banks - The Use of Weapons. I am a huge fan of both his sci-fi and his standard fiction (if you can call him standard, not really but anyone who is familiar will know what I mean), and am working through the Culture novels from the beginning although not in a straight run. I like to keep them on the shelf for when I feel like some good Sci-Fi :)

Davian93
11-15-2011, 09:28 AM
Is no-one reading anything at the moment then?



If you want to talk books, go to a book discussion site...you damn hippy!


Seriously though, I'm reading the following right now:

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
Hirohito and the Making of Modern Japan

In the hopper is:

Mistborn: Alloy of Law (assuming I ever go buy it)
Memory Sorrow and Thorn Series by Tad Williams (assuming I can find it at my local B & N...they didnt have it last time and I'm too lazy to Amazon it).

Sarevok
11-15-2011, 10:05 AM
I've recently finished: The Alloy of Law.

currently rereadin: The Way of Kings.

After that, I really should get back to my WoT reread...

WinespringBrother
11-15-2011, 10:33 AM
recently finished:

Fuzzy Nation by John Scalzi
The Alloy of Law by Brandon Sanderson
The Black Prism by Brent Weeks
The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch
The Desert Spear by Peter Brett
The Heroes by Joe Abercrombie
A Dance with Dragons by GRRM
The Light Fantastic by Terry Pratchett

Currently reading (whether or not I will finish):
The Unremembered by Peter Orullian
Red Seas Under Red Skies by Scott Lynch
The Scar by China Mieville

Khoram
11-15-2011, 11:04 AM
Currently reading: class notes on German and on the Modern Middle East. Fun stuff. :(

I want to get back to the good ol' days where I don't have to worry about reading a book that I want to. I just want to get back to fantasy and lose myself in that. Or historical fiction... Yeah... That'd be good... :D

yks 6nnetu hing
11-16-2011, 05:54 AM
Just finished Rebels and Traitors by Lindsey Davis. Very good historical fiction set in the English Civil War and beginning of Cromwell's protectorate, as far as I could tell thoroughly researched and I found the story interesting. People always forget that the English beheaded a king a good 150 years before the French. Then were so unhappy with the whole situation (because religious fanatics took over) they called the monarchy back. Sadly I found the end of the book quite disappointing.

Also finished the Kingdom of Gods trilogy by N(somethingsomething) Jemisin fairly recently.

How far back are we going? because I'm now in my re-read of WoT so have more or less recently finished books 1-7 of Wheel of Time.

Currently reading Path of Daggers and just started The Edge of the World by Kevin J Anderson.

Waiting are: the 3rd book in the Shadowmarch series, Alloy of Law, Hunger Games series and that Rothfuss book everyone loves.

Ishara
11-16-2011, 07:26 AM
*bump*

The Night Circus - Erin someone, maybe Morgenstein?


Did you like this? I've heard really good things.

Currently reading My Life in France by Julia Child. Just finished Thud and Making Money (I'm not sure what I'll DO when I reach the end of the series so far...how sad!), and have a historical fiction set in Rome in the hopper (can't remember what it's called, but I'll be breaking out the pics from the honeymoon for ambiance). Um, oh and I also just finished a non-fiction book on Genghis Khan that was ... less good than I would have wanted. Interesting, for sure, but it sort of fizzled. I guess sort of the way that his Empire did...

GonzoTheGreat
11-16-2011, 08:01 AM
I'm not sure what I'll DO when I reach the end of the series so far...how sad!There is the Science of Discworld trilogy. Which, admittedly, is only three books, for some reason.

SauceyBlueConfetti
11-16-2011, 11:30 AM
I have the following sitting on my nightstand waiting to dig in:

1. Black Company - heard lots of good stuff
2. Dance with Dragons (put it down after 12 pages, haven't picked back up) pfffffffft no motivation on this AT ALL
3. The Way of Kings - big, so leaving until I finish the WoT reread

I am currently flipping between my WoT reread ---up to Crossroads, random bits of Erikson's Malazan and a biography of Thomas Jefferson. Basically I read what I can reach when I have spare moments, and various stuff is all over the house. :D

Mort
11-16-2011, 07:04 PM
Just finished The Final Empire by Sanderson, moving on to the Well of Ascension now. Pretty decent so far.

Figbiscuit
11-21-2011, 09:27 AM
Did you like this? I've heard really good things.

Currently reading My Life in France by Julia Child. Just finished Thud and Making Money (I'm not sure what I'll DO when I reach the end of the series so far...how sad!), and have a historical fiction set in Rome in the hopper (can't remember what it's called, but I'll be breaking out the pics from the honeymoon for ambiance). Um, oh and I also just finished a non-fiction book on Genghis Khan that was ... less good than I would have wanted. Interesting, for sure, but it sort of fizzled. I guess sort of the way that his Empire did...

I really enjoyed it. Really really. One of those books I didn't want to end. It didn't get amazing reviews from what I have seen, but I can't help if book reviewers have no taste. I have pronounced it a keeper and will definitely be reading it again. I think on twitter I described it as 'darkly fantastical', if that is any incentive.

Thud is one of my all time favourite DW books EVER. Further to Gonzo's post I am also now reading the Science of the DW books, in my desperation for any new DW material, and am finding them very entertaining and amusing, without being overly baffling with the science parts. They actually make me feel like I understand it, even if I then promptly forget it again as soon as I put the book down :rolleyes:

SauceyBlueConfetti
11-21-2011, 10:18 AM
I really enjoyed it. Really really...

I think on twitter I described it as 'darkly fantastical', if that is any incentive.

Wow, wouldn't have thunk that of Julia Child bio

:rolleyes:

Davian93
11-21-2011, 10:33 AM
Wow, wouldn't have thunk that of Julia Child bio

:rolleyes:

What happens in the kitchen STAYS in the kitchen.

Davian93
11-21-2011, 10:35 AM
I'm reading Alloy of Law right now. I was gonna buy it from B & N but saw it was $24.99 for less than 300 pages so I got it for Kindle instead for half the price. I'm about 2/3 through it now...seems decent so far.

Figbiscuit
11-21-2011, 10:41 AM
Erm...I was replying to the question about The Night Circus, not Julia Child. No idea who she is?

I'm reading Alloy of Law right now. I was gonna buy it from B & N but saw it was $24.99 for less than 300 pages so I got it for Kindle instead for half the price. I'm about 2/3 through it now...seems decent so far.

Book killer :(

(Although granted, that would have been a very expensive very short book).

Davian93
11-21-2011, 10:46 AM
Erm...I was replying to the question about The Night Circus, not Julia Child. No idea who she is?



Book killer :(

(Although granted, that would have been a very expensive very short book).

Julia Child is/was a world famous, although apparently not that famous, American chef who brought French cooking techniques into the average American home back in the 1950s/1960s up through the 1990s before she passed away. Before her, many French recipes had never been translated into English and were thus inaccessible to American cooks. Of course now nobody ever cooks anymore but for those of us that do, her cookbooks are fantastic and a must own for any serious foodie.

As for being a book-killer...$25 is too much for a book the size of a YA novel. I was expecting at least 500 pages when I went to the store and was shocked to see how thin it was.

Figbiscuit
11-21-2011, 10:52 AM
Oh, OK. Nope, never heard of her, but can't imagine her bio would be THAT interesting.

Certainly not as good as the Night Circus ;)

Davian93
11-21-2011, 11:01 AM
Oh, OK. Nope, never heard of her, but can't imagine her bio would be THAT interesting.

Certainly not as good as the Night Circus ;)

I would imagine it would be pretty interesting actually. She was in the OSS (future CIA) during WWII and her life in France was supposedly pretty interesting as well. Her husband was also an OSS agent IIRC.

SauceyBlueConfetti
11-21-2011, 11:04 AM
Oh, OK. Nope, never heard of her, but can't imagine her bio would be THAT interesting.

Certainly not as good as the Night Circus ;)

Oh, I beg to differ
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ohiUbQyDhk