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ashley1falls
12-15-2010, 10:52 PM
It's been years since I read book twelve and I've decided to wait until the final book is released then go back and read all fourteen in one marathon.

That said, I'm wondering how you all feel the Brandon Sanderson books measure up compared to Robert Jordan's works?

I loved the first seven Wheel of Time books but found that RJ's storytelling began to wain during book eight. The cleansing of saidin in Winter's Heart was a pretty momentous occasion for the series but I never really thought anything substantial happened after that. Did it really have to take three books for Perrin to rescue Faile?

It was a terrible tragedy after such a brilliant beginning. When I was reading "The Shadow Rising" I really thought that this series was the best thing that had ever happened to fantasy. I suspect his failing health had a lot to do with the lack of action in the writing. Still, I look forward to seeing how the whole thing ends (and to seeing Moirraine again).

Juan
12-16-2010, 04:16 PM
There are other threads that widely talk about this topic and there are many discussions on them.

General consensus among WOT fans seems to be that Brandon does measure up to RJ. His writing style is quite different from Jordan's, and the plot moves along at neck-breaking speeds. There is a thread on this forum that compares both books written by Brandon and many liked the Gathering Storm better than Towers of Midnight, but still agreed that Towers of Midnight was a great book in itself. So that said, the two books written by Brandon do measure up to RJ and in many's opinion (including mine) they're better than RJ's long books of Perrin and all that (although believe it or not, the detailedness and descriptiveness of those books begins to pay off now, later in the series).

Definitely continue on; you won't be disappointed.

morat'corlm
12-16-2010, 06:15 PM
It's impossible to achieve consensus about personal opinions.

I'm not a fan of Sanderson's contributions to the series, but both are better than what I consider the worst book of WOT, The Eye of the World.

Juan
12-16-2010, 06:41 PM
I said general consensus. Meaning overall most people seem to have liked the books written by Sanderson. Doesn't mean all.

Isabel
12-17-2010, 12:10 AM
That people have liked the Sanderson books, doesn't mean they think he measures up to RJ or that his books are better.....

Terez
12-17-2010, 12:01 PM
Some do, though, and in general those fans who fell away from the series during 8-10 seem to prefer Brandon's style. There are some exceptions, obviously.

Nafro
12-17-2010, 12:13 PM
I have now ready many Sanderson books and I like his writing style better than RJ's. If I had to describe RJ's writing style in one word, I would call it "Conceited". He has a great story and world, but in the later books I think he got too wrapped up in thinking he was some literary master (which he was), but this resulted in little plot progression and way too much description. If you haven't done so already, read Brandon's WoT books. You won't be dissapointed. But even better is The Way of Kings. Best fantasy book I have read to date.

Terez
12-17-2010, 12:16 PM
I don't think it was conceit so much as a response to the online fandom and our love for the mystery aspect of the series. He did a lot of character development and intrigue-building in the slow books, as opposed to action.

Nafro
12-17-2010, 12:19 PM
I don't think it was conceit so much as a response to the online fandom and our love for the mystery aspect of the series. He did a lot of character development and intrigue-building in the slow books, as opposed to action.

I enjoy the intrigue, probably more than most, but there is no excuse for PoD. That book was dreadful.

Terez
12-17-2010, 12:39 PM
It was pretty awesome, actually. It had a dreadful chapter or two when the Bowl was used, but Rand's campaign against the Seanchan was good stuff, as were Egwene's chapters, the prologue, etc.

The Angry Druid
12-18-2010, 11:20 PM
First off, one should remember that there is indeed some RJ in both tGS, ToM, and will likely be more in aMoL.

Having said that, I'd think most WoT fans would point to one of the following as their favorites:

Most liked: Great Hunt, Shadow Rising, Fires of Heaven, Lord of Chaos.

Crossroads of Twilight is probably the least liked (no plot advancement). And many also do not like Winter's Heart or Path of Daggers much either.

I'd think most would put Eye of the World, The Dragon Reborn, A Crown of Swords, New Spring, and Knife of Drams somewhere in the middle. With some putting EoTW or DR up with the top ones, and some putting aCoS with the disliked ones.

I'd say most have put the two Sanderson efforts at least in the middle tier, if not the top.

For me:

Best: tGH, tSR, tFoH, LoC.
Next: EoTW, tGS.
Middle: tDR, NS, ACoS, tPoD, WH, KoD, ToM.
Worst: CoT

FelixPax
12-19-2010, 04:39 AM
I loved the first seven Wheel of Time books but found that RJ's storytelling began to wain during book eight. The cleansing of saidin in Winter's Heart was a pretty momentous occasion for the series but I never really thought anything substantial happened after that.

That makes two us. Well, I at least once felt this way too.

Since the cleansing of saidin, many little things have slowly created a situation where Mat Cauthon will most likely become "King" of the Westlands, in the final book of the series, AMoL . A re-born Artur Hawking's soul, perhap Mat Cauthon is?

During your re-reading, I'd suggest renewed focus on everything touching or surrounding Mat Cauthon's storyline. Be it "the raven", Perrin thinks of when he views "Arthur Hawkwing's statue's eye" in tEotW book, to the interactions between Mat Cauthon and almost every single Da'shain Aiel descendent group in the Westlands: Aiel, Sea Folk, Showfolk (e.g. Valan Luca), Tuatha'an et la. To even the "Gardeners" below Mat Cauthon and Egwene al'Vere, during a scene in the Stone of Tear, in TSR Chapter 8 'Hard Heads'.

Mat Cauthon and Tuon's growing and changing relationship is one theme following after the Cleansing of the Taint, in Winter Heart book.

If LoC ends with Rand al'Thor as the acknowledged Dragon Reborn, ACoS is the beginning a story where Mat Cauthon starts a journey to become the Prince of Ravens. Mat buys a "ring", at ACoS Chapter 14, which symbolizes one fulfillment of one damane's foretelling of Tuon's future. If Rand's a destroyer of the old, Mat's a bringer together of its remnants, to create something a new once again.

What is this something a new come once again?
Valan Luca and re-creation of 'the People', out of its remnants.
Who is to lead this re-creation of the 'the People'?
Mat Cauthon, as the Aelfinn once claimed.

Should I go home to help my people?” he asked finally.

Three sets of slitted eyes lifted from him—reluctantly, it seemed—and studied the air above his head. Finally the woman on the left said, “You must go to Rhuidean.”

The Shadow Rising, Chapter 15 "Into the Doorway" -- Mat Cauthon point of view; with the Aelfinn

“What fate?”

The three were on their feet atop the pedestals, and he could not tell which shrieked which answer.

“To marry the Daughter of the Nine Moons!”
“To die and live again, and live once more a part of what was!”
“To give up half the light of the world to save the world!”

The Shadow Rising, Chapter 15 "Into the Doorway" -- Mat Cauthon point of view; with the Aelfinn

Jordan's is tricky in his use of language, as one can interpret the bold section of a sentence above in multiple ways. What do the Aelfinn mean when they claim to Mat, "and live once more a part of what was!”

What is "what was"? What place in time, do the Aelfinn mean?

I think they meant to hide the truth from Mat Cauthon, as much as possible... yet, they told the truth. Rhuidean was once the home for the Jenn Aiel, who were among the last survivors of the Da'Shain Aiel way of life. Mat Cauthon is to re-create what once was, the Da'Shain Aiel as a culture, a society, a group with role in the world has a broader meaning. A seeker of a lasting peace, of conflict with a resolution in sight, because of who Mat Cauthon is becoming as a man.


General consensus among WOT fans seems to be that Brandon does measure up to RJ.

No. No way.
That comparison isn't fair to Robert Jordan, nor to Brandon Sanderson.
Each will stand or fall on their own.

Brandon had a following of his own, before Harriet called....
Harriet's call and offer though has given Brandon a great opportunity to gain a new broader audience. Besides a surer financial footing. ;)

Crossroads of Twilight is probably the least liked (no plot advancement).

That's bull--"no plot advancement" in CoT.
CoT was far superior, what follows in TGS or TofM.

Hell, even Brandon Sanderson has claimed, in a video interview with another author present in a Hotel room, that Robert Jordan became more descriptive and a stronger writer in later books including WH, CoT, KoD.

If one doesn't understand the later books in the series, that's mostly a reader's fault. Jordan claimed that position in multiple interviews, across the years.


Some do, though, and in general those fans who fell away from the series during 8-10 seem to prefer Brandon's style. There are some exceptions, obviously.

Chuckles, I guess that puts me in an exception category:


as I tend to dislike Brandon's writing style as found in Warbreaker, TGS, ToFM books;
as I fell away from WoT after reading ACoS book years ago, only to re-read the series again after a strong recommendation from a cousin and his family, who all claimed the series became stronger in WH, CoT, KoD books. :)


I did not like who Rand al'Thor become as a character in ACoS (and later in TPoD)... yet reading years ago at the time, I didn't grasp why the author needed to write those books in the way he did. Now I seeing those books as a counter-balance, to what is to come.

If you haven't done so already, read Brandon's WoT books. You won't be dissapointed. But even better is The Way of Kings. Best fantasy book I have read to date.

I picked up Warbreaker and read the first 125 pages, then dropped like a dead rat. Why? No one like-able character to care for, nor an interesting enough plot to grab my attention. Thus, I was disappointed by one of Brandon Sanderson non-WoT books. :(

I'd hope for Brandon's literary career sake 'The Way of Kings' is superior to his prior works, and his own literary writing within the Wheel of Time series. I missed Robert Jordan's style of writing, it's dense details and thick descriptions, found in WoT.

Brandon's efforts so far, simply does not measure up to Robert Jordan complete published works thus far. I'd glad he's attempted to complete WoT series, but it is noticeably awkward, be it TGS or TofM books. In essence, it feels like plain old fan fiction. Sigh. Or perhaps, I'm tired of Brandon's IKEA-esque styling?

Why do I want to finish reading this series, even with the Halo of IKEA-esque awkwardness embedded by influence of Brandon's 'plain chant' writing style? Because the very first book in the series grabbed me, in a way Warbreaker did not. Jordan created a set of characters which one can feel for, in "The Eye of the World".


Whereas, in both TGS and later in TofM books, Brandon just cannot seem to grasp who these characters are, what they're gone through, how they're changed over time, and why they're decided to change. Be it, Mat Cauthon sense of humor in TGS, or grasping Elayne's character in ToFM. Yes, Elayne's character unfortunately felt off in TofM book--it's a screw-up, from my perspective for 'Team Jordan'. At times, it feels at if the world of the wheel of time has been stripped of thick foretelling descriptions or details... which were found all across the series, before Brandon took up the challenge of writing the original AMoL book.