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View Full Version : The Templars: History and Myth


yks 6nnetu hing
09-09-2011, 08:02 AM
by Michael Haag

it's written in 2008, after yet another set of lovely conspiracy theories in the form of fiction which *some people* still manage to take as Fact (The Da Vinci Code and sequels).

It's quite a good read on the history of the times, the politics of why and how the Templars (and the Hospitallers) were founded, what they contributed and how they were brought down. The one crucial new piece of information handled in this book is the Chinon parchment found in the Vatican archives in the early 2000's. The reason it's so groundbreaking is that it sheds light on how much power struggle between the Pope and King of France there was over the supposed heresy of the Templars. The Chinon parchment is the Pope's verdict, after having heard the testimony of the arrested Templars*. The Chinon parchment declares the Templars absolved. Not innocent, seeing as there were certain rituals that werent' entirely Christian but were more in line with initiation rites, in preparation for the future possibility of being captured and forced to taunt the Cross or whatnot.

Anyways, the book also has a very nice summary of the various best-spread conspiracy theories and when each emerged (from Freemasons to Bonesmen to the New World Order). And the author takes a few wonderful shots at several loony-bin candidates, among them (people who believe) Dan Brown, the Stephanie Meyer of historic fiction.


While I'm reading this, I keep thinking of Whitecloaks, as the Templars were a very clear model for that particular fictional organization. The thing about Whitecloaks that sort of... doesn't add up, especially when compared to the Templars is: where do they get their money? Sure, they practically rule Amadicia but unlike the Templars they don't collect taxes, do they? Are there any bits of land that literally belong to the Whitecloaks?



*in secret, while the King wasn't looking. Because Philip IV of France had had the previous Pope brutally beaten, as a result of which the latter died. The new Pope had to walk a very careful line with the aggressive and greedy king, who was waging an extensive propaganda war against the Templars. The public opinion at the time was not very agreeable. This would be why the Chinon parchment was not published at the time and got misplaced when the Papacy moved from Avignon to Vatican and wasn't found until 700 years after the events.

GonzoTheGreat
09-09-2011, 08:30 AM
Maybe the Whitecloaks have caught on to one of the tricks of the Spanish Inquisition: executed Darkfriends obviously neither deserve nor need their wealth anymore, so the Children of the Light might as well take that. But only after a proper trial, of course.

yks 6nnetu hing
09-09-2011, 08:54 AM
Maybe the Whitecloaks have caught on to one of the tricks of the Spanish Inquisition: executed Darkfriends obviously neither deserve nor need their wealth anymore, so the Children of the Light might as well take that. But only after a proper trial, of course.

er... but not many darkfriends possess a ruby-tipped dagger to confiscate.

GonzoTheGreat
09-09-2011, 09:16 AM
er... but not many darkfriends possess a ruby-tipped dagger to confiscate.So they have to catch a lot of them. Hard work, granted, but they seem willing to do this.