PDA

View Full Version : The Wheel Weaves, the Pattern Wills


New Futurist Man
09-23-2011, 01:59 AM
The theory:

Sometimes, in Ages gone by, in Ages yet to come, the Pattern has served “the Destroyer” - AKA the Shadow Champion, Moridin, and he has dutifully served it. With this theory I'm attempting to prove the existence of a "Third Force" operative in the multiverse: the Pattern itself.

In order to prove this, the theory will:

1) seek to logically extend the understanding we have of the Pattern and the nature of its power and suggest its own neutrality vis--vis the battle between Shadow and Light;

2) question the Dragon’s relationship with the Pattern, suggesting (with some confidence) that Channellers (ultimately) stand above the causative, cyclic nature of the Wheel because they share in the very Principle which drives it;

3) refine Moridin’s own purpose, and show how his understanding of it is skewed in this Age;

4) will offer Hawkwing’s enigmatic remark at Falme as proof of the theory, revealing as it does testament that the Heroes of the Horn have fought the Dragon in Ages past, as well as show that the Heroes of the Horn are the Pattern’s in-built defence mechanism, and thus serve neither Light nor Shadow;

*

The Problem: Moridin’s incessant attempts in the early books to convince the Dragon he once served the Shadow in Ages past - is, and remains, considering what we‘ve learned of the Dragon‘s true nature - a puzzle. What’s most puzzling is that the Nae’blis seems genuinely convinced of it. If we discount Moridin’s possible insanity, then we can genuinely ask: in what manner have these two men fought?

“Oh, I know the name you use now, Lews Therin. I know every name you have used through Age after Age, long before you were even the Kinslayer..[..]..I know you, know your blood and your line back to the first spark of life that ever was, back to the First Moment. You can never hide from me. Never! We are tied together as surely as two sides of the same coin….” [..]
“Father of Lies!” Rand managed. [..] “You lie, and lie, and even when you tell the truth, you twist it to a lie.”’
The Great Hunt, Kinslayer, page(s) 242-243

Ishamael offers a lot of detail in this quote for it all to be merely a fancy of his imagination. However, according to Verin:

“In all [..] worlds, whatever their other variations, a few things are constant. One is that the Dark One is imprisoned in all of them.”
The Dragon Reborn, page 239

If the Dark One is now and always has been "imprisoned" in all worlds, then doesn't this strongly suggest that although Moridin and the Dragon have fought countless times - that the Dragon has always won? Possibly. But another reading is that Verin is being coy with the truth. Her statement doesn't negate the Dark One's victory in Ages past, what it does is leave room for the Dark One's victory by employing the term "world" as a product solely of the Creator's handiwork. In other words: whatever comes after the Dark One's victory may be a 'something', but its not a "world" in the accepted sense.

That's one explanation of the Ishamael quote. Another explanation - the one I'm attempting to prove - is this: Moridin and the Dragon's war was often a war which didn’t have as prize the freeing of the Dark One and the termination of the turning of the Wheel. Sure, Moridin has always been "the Destroyer" - and yeah, he and the Light’s champion have fought countless times throughout the Ages, but - and this is the twist - however much Moridin may detest the fact: sometimes he was the ‘good guy’ (relatively) and the Dragon was the ‘badguy‘.

Hard one to swallow, isn’t it?

What is the Pattern?

[Verin: ]“The Wheel weaves our lives to make the Pattern of an Age, but the Ages themselves are woven into the Age Lace, the Great Pattern. Who can know if this is even the tenth part of the weaving, though? Some in the Age of Legends apparently believe that there were still other worlds — even harder to reach than the worlds of the Portal Stones, if that can be believed — lying like this.” She drew more lines, cross-hatching the first set. For a moment she stared at them. “The warp and the woof of the weave. Perhaps the Wheel of Time weaves a still greater Pattern from worlds.”
The Dragon Reborn, A World of Dreams, page(s) 238-239

This admission from Verin has staggering implications, and as we can attribute her with knowledge which surpasses the average Aes Sedai, Brown Ajah or otherwise, encompassing as it does not just the erudition gleaned from the libraries of the Westlands, but also what her time spent as a member of the Black Ajah taught her, we can accept it as revealing something of the incredible breadth of the Pattern. To put it simply: the Pattern, the Great Pattern, is a huge construction, that weaves the countless souls who people the worlds together in something resembling harmony - I say ‘resembling’ as the warp and weft is so huge no one can really know if indeed it is a harmony.
But is it accurate to call the Pattern ‘good’? If yes, by who or what’s standard? And relative to what?
Maybe better to simply say: the Pattern functions. Simple as.

[Moraine:] “The Creator is good, Perrin. The Father of Lies is evil. The Pattern of Age, the Age Lace itself, is neither. The Pattern is what is. The Wheel of Time weaves all lives into the Pattern, all actions. A Pattern that is all one color is no pattern. For the Pattern of an Age, good and ill are the warp and the woof.”
The Dragon Reborn, Within the Weave, (page 378)

According to Moraine also, the Pattern simply is. In other words, although it may have originally been invested with enough benevolent impetus by the Creator, it itself possesses no sentience, thus makes no judgement as to good or evil.

However we do see it defend itself in the persons of the Heroes of the Horn who, you could say, represent the Pattern’s defence mechanism. When the Pattern is threatened - they are mobilised. As Hawkwing asserts:

“I have fought by your side times beyond number, Lews Therin, and faced you as many more. The Wheel spins us out for its purposes, not ours, to serve the Pattern..”
The Great Hunt, The Grave Is No Bar to My Call, page(s) 661

As we’ve also established that the Pattern is not intrinsically good, the above means Hawkwing’s declaration poses an interesting - and necessary - possibility: That in Ages past the Pattern has had to defend itself not just from the Shadow and its champion - but also from the Light and its champion, namely an incarnation of the Dragon.

Meaning Hawkwing’s assertion that he’s fought against Lews Therin Telamon as often as alongside him doesn’t mean that, what we appropriate as a “darkfriend” in this Age, had the good fortune of blowing the Horn of Valere - the Pattern wouldn’t allow that - nor would the Heroes fight for him once they appeared, as they were quite cogent re propriety at Falme - but rather in past Ages it has been the power of the Dragon and his followers which have threatened to destroy the Pattern and how it operates, forcing the Heroes to fight alongside an incarnation of Moridin’s soul against the Champion of the Light.

Therefore, in such Ages it was the power of the Light which threatened to usurp the causative, sequential operation of the Pattern, to break free entirely of the hold the Pattern has on ‘humanity’. This emancipation would have been led and orchestrated by the Dragon of the Light, He who stands closest to the sheer creative principle embodied in the person of the Creator, a principle which, in these Ages, threatened to negate the temporal and physical laws underpinning the Pattern - as much as the Dark One breaking free would - through absolute mastery of the One Power.

This the Pattern reared up against, activating Moridin and providing him the Heroes to fight against the Channellers. Only this explains the long held assertion of Moridin that he and the Dragon have fought countless times during the turning of the Wheel - and mitigates against the possibility the Dragon has ever served the Shadow, which seems to have been proved by the ‘Borderlander’ prophecy, which underlined the share the Dragon has with divinity.

The Solution:

Isn't it a gross over-simplification to suppose the purpose of the Dragon is to counter the Shadow’s champion and the Shadow generally - and nothing more? In Age’s were the Shadow never threatens, were the Dark One is never discovered, and the soul of, as Lews Therin Telamon put it, ‘the Destroyer’ is content to wile away his days penning doorstoppers on logic, nihilism and the purposelessness of existence - is it possible in Age’s such as this that it is the Light‘s champion which threatens the Pattern? Which, like the danger the Dark One’s chaotic sentience poses to the causative, karmic nature of the Pattern, that it is a perfected Dragon and his followers, with weaves which entirely sublate the fundamental laws of the physical universe that triggers the reaction of the Pattern to mobilise the Heroes and the “Shadow Champion”, aka Moridin?

In every Age its a logical necessity that the fulfilment of each of the Champion's souls' desire is not met - in Moridin’s case this is the termination of the turning of the Wheel; and in the Dragon’s case……?

What exactly is the Dragon’s ultimate purpose...?

Surely the Dragon - the Chosen One - the very physical incarnation of the Light itself! - doesn’t exist and kick about Age after Age as merely insurance against the eventuality the Dark One is discovered and the turning of the Wheel is threatened?

Is it not possible the Dragon has his own entelechy? One which is as dangerous to the Pattern as the Dark One breaking free is?

[Verin:] “The Dark One is the embodiment of paradox and chaos, the destroyer of reason and logic, the breaker of balance, the unmaker of order.”
The Dragon Reborn, A World of Dreams

The description of the Dark One as embodying “paradox and chaos” is mirrored in the description of the Dragon:

'..The breaker of bonds; the forger of chains. The maker of futures; the unshaper of destiny.”
The Dragon Reborn, Commentaries on the Prophecies of the Dragon, Page 9

It can be contended that when these attributes are allotted to the Dark One they refer to his fundamental nature as rupturing the laws underpinning the Pattern, whereas the Dragon’s only specify his reversing custom, toppling kings and queens, and generally upsetting the political applecart. But Rand’s ta’veren power frequently appears to be operative at the same level as the Dark One, albeit in a reverse, benevolent fashion.

Conclusion:

We started with certain points which required proving in order to lend credence to the theory. These were, to:

1) seek to logically extend the understanding of the Pattern and the nature of its power and suggest its own neutrality vis--vis the battle between Shadow and Light;

And secondly, to:

2) question the Dragon’s relationship with the Pattern, suggesting (with some confidence) that Channellers stand above the causative, cyclic nature of the Wheel because they share in the very Principle which drives the Wheel itself;

>>> The Pattern according to the wisdom of Verin and Moraine is morally neutral in human terms, and follows a course that is beyond the ken of human understanding. This provides solid ground for the theory: revealing a Pattern that ultimately doesn't side with human notions of “good” and “evil” but adheres to its own laws, and thus would have no problem mobilising forces at its command to counteract something - Channellers in this instance - which fundamentally negate the laws of its own nature.

3) refine Moridin’s own purpose, and show how his understanding of it is skewed in this Age;

>>> Moridin’s well-documented identity crisis with the Dark One goes pretty far in obscuring the man’s true nature both to himself and to others, which, although it bears striking analogies with the Dark One, is - in a multiverse were all possible variations exist - simply the perfect extreme to the liberating quality of the Light, which thus makes it an ally with the Dark One - and NOT a product of It/Him.

4) will offer Hawkwing’s enigmatic remark at Falme as proof of the theory, revealing as it does testament that the heroes have fought the Dragon in Ages past, as well as show that the Heroes of the Horn are the Pattern’s in-built defense mechanism, and thus serve neither Light nor Shadow;

+++ The evidence is over-bearing that the Pattern has, in Ages past, moved against the Champion of the Light. To once more quote Hawkwing:

“Only a few are bound to the Wheel, spun out again and again [I]to work the will of the Wheel in the Pattern of the Ages.”
The Great Hunt, The Grave Is No Bar to My Call, (page(s) 661)

“I have fought by your side times beyond number, Lews Therin, and faced you as many more. The Wheel spins us out for its purposes, not ours, to serve the Pattern. I know you, if you do not know yourself….”
The Great Hunt, The Grave Is No Bar to My Call, (page(s) 661)

In Ages past its entirely possible Hawkwing and the other Heroes have stood before Moridin, where Hawkwing says something almost identical as he did to Rand:

“I know you, [even] if you do not know yourself...”

The Wheel weaves, the Pattern wills.....

kabkaba
09-26-2011, 02:32 PM
Very interesting theory, well written and reasonable.

New Futurist Man
09-27-2011, 05:08 PM
Thanks Kabkaba.

I think the theory has merit considering the evidence, but is, unfortunately, impossible to definitively prove.

Perhaps one of the outriggers RJ planned on penning would've featured Moridin as the book's hero? Using the True Power for the good of the Pattern....!?

Minaeve
10-07-2011, 06:22 AM
WoW! certainly gets you thinkin that one!

fdsaf3
10-07-2011, 07:29 AM
Sorry to do this, but you should check out the interview database on what RJ has to say regarding the Pattern and the soul of the Dragon.

I don't have time to write up an appropriate response right now, but I encourage you to look into those resources. Some of your questions have definitive answers.