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Davian93
11-06-2011, 09:35 PM
I'm just gonna throw this out there as I'm looking for insight from others that might have such stoves. We've been shopping for a secondary heat source for our house other than kerosene heaters and our fireplace and we're debating between pellet, wood, or coal stoves. Do any of you have any experience on installation costs of both...assuming a new chimney has to be put in for a wood/coal stove but with a pellet stove, we can just direct vent through the wall of the house.

Here is the coal/wood stove we're looking at:

http://www.morsoeusa.com/Mors%C3%B8-1410-1652.aspx

For pellet stoves, we are looking at something in the 30-45K BTU range but the drawback for them is they need electricity to run and we lose power somewhat regularly so that's a concern.

For fuel cost, anthracite coal is cheaper than wood pellets but if its just a pure wood stove, I have more than enough wood on my property including about 5-6 cords already pre-cut and dried just for this winter (it was a busy summer of spring/summer of cutting, splitting and stacking).

So...anyone have any experience with this?

Sei'taer
11-06-2011, 09:51 PM
I'm just gonna throw this out there as I'm looking for insight from others that might have such stoves. We've been shopping for a secondary heat source for our house other than kerosene heaters and our fireplace and we're debating between pellet, wood, or coal stoves. Do any of you have any experience on installation costs of both...assuming a new chimney has to be put in for a wood/coal stove but with a pellet stove, we can just direct vent through the wall of the house.

Here is the coal/wood stove we're looking at:

http://www.morsoeusa.com/Mors%C3%B8-1410-1652.aspx

For pellet stoves, we are looking at something in the 30-45K BTU range but the drawback for them is they need electricity to run and we lose power somewhat regularly so that's a concern.

For fuel cost, anthracite coal is cheaper than wood pellets but if its just a pure wood stove, I have more than enough wood on my property including about 5-6 cords already pre-cut and dried just for this winter (it was a busy summer of spring/summer of cutting, splitting and stacking).

So...anyone have any experience with this?

I've used a pellet stove before and I really liked it. It didn't use electricity though so I am not sure what you are looking at (brand wise, I mean). Just remember, you might have to install an outside air intake with a pellet stove.

As for the rest, I don't know anything about an oil or coal stove.

Davian93
11-06-2011, 09:54 PM
I've used a pellet stove before and I really liked it. It didn't use electricity though so I am not sure what you are looking at (brand wise, I mean). Just remember, you might have to install an outside air intake with a pellet stove.

As for the rest, I don't know anything about an oil or coal stove.

All the pellet stoves Ive seen so far use electricity for the auger that feeds from the hopper. This, of course, costs significantly more upfront for the stove but it doesnt require a new chimney which is a good savings in itself. The elec

Brita
11-06-2011, 09:58 PM
We put in a Regency high efficiency wood stove several years ago as our main heating source. We use our oil furnace (the heat that was in the house already) as back up.

We have a medium stove, and it easily heats our house (1600 sq feet). We love it, and my husband regularly says it was one of the best decisions of his life (marrying me is of course his first). We had to install a chimney as well, and I think it cost us around $ 5000 when all was said and done. Very reasonable.

Tips-
- get the optional fan, it really moves the heat.
- Get a flat top to heat water and food when the hydro goes out.
- Place it low in your house so the heat rises, naturally filling your house.
- Put the chimney up on the inside of your house, not on the outside. It reduces the cold air draft when starting a cold stove, and keeps more heat inside.

yks 6nnetu hing
11-07-2011, 03:21 AM
dekpending on how much land you have, ground heating (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geothermal_heat_pump) might be an option. it's nice because the same unit can be used for airco in the summer.

Other than that, I'm not familiar with the brands they sell over there but I do know that the type of wood you use for burning has an effect to the kind of heat you get, hardwood is best for a long lasting heat while pine or conifer will give a quick heat and can make the air really dry.

Davian93
11-07-2011, 07:31 AM
Well, we have an oil boiler for our primary heat source and I have a gas range with a propane hookup for cooking in emergencies. We dont have a natural gas line out where I live so I have to have propane delivered for the stove maybe once a year.

Right now, we're leaning very heavily towards the coal/wood combo stove from Morso as coal is a very efficient, cheap heat source and it will likely cut my oil bill in half. Right now I pay about $3400 a year for oil so this stove would likely cut that bill in half as it would cover about 60% of my heating needs at a minimum and it is far more controllable for heat usage. The major upfront cost of it is putting a stove pipe up and through my roof which will likely run me close to $1500-$2000 on top of the stove. Still, I'd probably break even after 2 years.

yks, ironically, the stove we're looking at is Danish, not American...which I assume means it also seconds as a yummy breakfast pastry.

Our oil furnace is about 25 years old so its on its last legs...maybe 3-4 years left on it. Once its gone, its getting replaced with a wood pellet boiler as I want to be oil free (not because I care about the environment but because oil is wicked expensive and wood pellets are cheap.)

Davian93
11-07-2011, 08:23 PM
So...went with the coal/wood combo stove from Morso. The installer is coming out this week to take measurements and our quote for everything (stove, chimney/stove pipes, and labor) is about $3,400.00. Cant wait to start using it.

Ishara
11-08-2011, 10:17 AM
Pretty soon Dav is going to be one of those hippies starting a commune out there in the forest. Just sayin'. ;)

yks 6nnetu hing
11-08-2011, 10:18 AM
Pretty soon Dav is going to be one of those hippies starting a commune out there in the forest. Just sayin'. ;)

farmers, they're called farmers.

or quakers/hermits, depends on your point of view

*hides*

Davian93
11-08-2011, 10:41 AM
farmers, they're called farmers.

or quakers/hermits, depends on your point of view

*hides*

I have a survivalist streak in me. I like to be prepared. Last fall, we lost power for over 4 days and it was brutal. Even with the fireplace going full blast, it hovered around 58-60 degrees in the house and I had to feed the fire constantly. I have wanted a more reliable heating source since then as we live in an area where power outages are simply part of the fun. Looking at the fun Connecticut has been having, it simply reinforced the desire to have a secondary source of heat and to do it this winter instead of waiting any longer. Thus, we are now getting a heat stove.

Also, oil has gotten ridiculously expensive for heating so I want to save some money.

Ishara
11-08-2011, 11:55 AM
And the chickens? :p

Davian93
11-08-2011, 11:57 AM
And the chickens? :p

I like fresh eggs.

Infidel
11-08-2011, 02:18 PM
In the description of the stove you're buying, Dav:

"Morsø 1410 coal is a classic radiant coal stove that will quickly and efficiently heat small living spaces; it features Morsø’s ‘trade-mark’ squirrel relief on both sides."

It seems the Dark Mother is diversifying. Does this make you a minion, or a lackey?

Davian93
12-02-2011, 07:38 PM
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-ORpF-QRJ4wc/TtlvB-6vkaI/AAAAAAAAArc/Exh2Fhx_fsQ/s400/20111202140951.jpg

And it was installed today...and its going full blast now. The coal fire looks a lot different than the one pictured (that's a wood one to build up a nice coal bed for the anthracite to ignite). So far, I'm loving it.

Davian93
12-03-2011, 09:27 PM
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-8KiWh2-vEPA/TtrZYjL-kdI/AAAAAAAAArk/vZvIWNrMTvo/s400/20111203212104.jpg

This is what a coal fire looks like...as I'm guessing most have never really seen one. Its quite different and interesting compared to wood. And anthracite puts off a ton of heat. Its 30 degrees outside, 85 degrees in my sunroom where the stove is and 70 degrees in the rest of the downstairs.

Loving it!

Res_Ipsa
12-03-2011, 09:35 PM
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-ORpF-QRJ4wc/TtlvB-6vkaI/AAAAAAAAArc/Exh2Fhx_fsQ/s400/20111202140951.jpg

And it was installed today...and its going full blast now. The coal fire looks a lot different than the one pictured (that's a wood one to build up a nice coal bed for the anthracite to ignite). So far, I'm loving it.

This pic reminds me of my family's cabins on Lake Lake Laberge in the Yukon territories. Which is to say it makes me think of home and props dude looks very nice and cozy.

Davian93
12-03-2011, 09:44 PM
This pic reminds me of my family's cabins on Lake Lake Laberge in the Yukon territories. Which is to say it makes me think of home and props dude looks very nice and cozy.

Thanks Res. We're going for a country look with our home...which kinda goes considering we're in the woods on a bunch of acres with thousands of acres of forest around us. The whole house is very cabiny/country and its a completely open concept home. The stove is in our finished sunroom...the hallway in the back where you can see a mess and my golfclubs is the old mudroom/closet area that has been finished out along with the sunroom (the new wood floors, the wainscoting, etc. The wainscoting is going to be white and we're still debating our paint colors for the wall of the sunroom. The rest of the downstairs is an open space with a double sided fireplace in the center of the home and hardwood floors throughout. I'm also remodeling the kitchen right now (sanding/painting the cabinets white, putting butcher block counters in, a giant farmhouse sink, a new island (really a butcher block table) etc etc.

Its a work in progress to say the least. Once its done, it will be nice. The stove is great and I love burning anthracite...despite what hippies say, its clean, hot and cheap. And we have about 700 years of it left in the known mines just in PA.