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Khoram
11-11-2011, 12:00 AM
On this day, on November 11th, I would like to thank all those men and women who have served our countries, and those who sacrificed their lives so that we may live with peace and the many freedoms we have. It is through their deaths and sacrifices that we are able to live. For that, I am eternally grateful.

On this day, I will Remember.

Thereís a song here (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WxJf9ZezTZE&list=PL0AD7CF4A762309BE&index=5&feature=plpp_video) that I quite like, and I feel it fits all those who have lost somebody close to them, but in particular those men and women who gave their lives for us. I actually came upon it last year when going through YouTube looking at songs for Remembrance Day, and liked it so much I favourited it XD and lo and behold, I found it again this year; itís just as touching to me now as it was last year.


Please, listen and enjoy, and donít forget to remember. I will keep all of you in my thoughts and prayers. Thank you again for giving of yourself so that we, as civilians, could live in peace.

Thank you.

Cor Shan
11-11-2011, 03:35 AM
Three other songs that get dust in my eyes today:

Green Fields of France (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L_G4eq9Fudc)
Highway of Heroes (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QrkgV5bl7kQ)
And the Band Played Waltzing Matilda (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0lE-YjjZhwc)

ShadowbaneX
11-11-2011, 01:05 PM
I should have headed down town again this year, but no one wanted to go with me. :(

Still, to those that have served and those that have Fallen. Lest We Forget.

Gilshalos Sedai
11-11-2011, 01:13 PM
This is a day to thank all those who have served.

Thank you.

~Wonders if Bryan and Dav will thank each other~

Davian93
11-11-2011, 04:47 PM
YOU'RE WELCOME


Seriously though...remember all those who served today...especially those that made the ultimate sacrifice.

Basel Gill
11-12-2011, 02:19 AM
Formerly known as "Armistice Day". At 11:11am on the date 11/11/1918, millions of people stopped killing each other. That seems to get lost in the sands of time.

:::Hopping off soap box:::

Thank you vets for having the dedication and guts I'd not likely have.

Frenzy
11-12-2011, 02:33 AM
What also gets lost is that Armistice Day was the last day of the War that was supposed to end all wars. Too bad our species is too fucking stupid to learn from its horrific mistakes, and dreams up more horrific ways to kill each other over the stupidest of reasons. And too bad our brothers, sisters, sons, and daughters have to take up arms to defend us and put down the stupidity.

I take the kids to march with their scout friends every year in the local Veteren's Day parade. And as i walk by and look at the faces of Vets from Afghanistan, Iraq, Vietnam, Korea, and even a few from WWII, i can't help but think that we've failed them and doomed the kids i'm marching with to a future riddled with the same stupidity that apparently isn't horrific enough for us to stop being assholes to each other on a geopolitical scale.

But i suppose there's still hope. i certainly hope there is, anyway.

Khoram
11-12-2011, 09:56 AM
But i suppose there's still hope. i certainly hope there is, anyway.

Obviously, there still is, if you're hoping for hope. ;)






Human nature sucks. Period.

ShadowbaneX
11-12-2011, 12:47 PM
Formerly known as "Armistice Day". At 11:11am on the date 11/11/1918, millions of people stopped killing each other. That seems to get lost in the sands of time.

:::Hopping off soap box:::

Thank you vets for having the dedication and guts I'd not likely have.
Perhaps some have lost it's meaning, but then in these days many people only know there's a World War I because something had to come before World War II.

In other places though the Poppy & "In Flanders Fields" are the primary symbols of Remembrance Day and we still understand the reasons why they were chosen.

The entire motto of the affair is "Lest We Forget" and that means all the soldiers that fought and died and the battles and wars in which they fought.

Further, there weren't entirely millions trying to kill each other in the final hours on November 11th, 1918, most were hunkered down, daring to hope that they'd survive, as Frenzy said, The War to End All Wars.

So, yes, please stay down off your damned soap box.

Khoram
11-12-2011, 01:35 PM
So I was on Ancestry.ca, last night, and I found some really interesting info on my great-great-uncle, who was killed in the First World War.

It wasn't much, but I found out where exactly he was killed, that his body was never found, and that his name is on the Vimy Memorial. Now I have even more reason to scout everything out. :D

He died in September, 1916, in the Somme, just East of Courcelette, Picardy, France - that same document also says that he was probably buried in Sausage Valley.

My research on Sausage Valley puts it at Pozieres, which is about 3 km southwest of Courcelette. My thought is that he died in Courcelette, and, seeing as his body was never found, is probably still there. Otherwise, he would have been found. Unless they couldn't identify his body. But then why specify he was buried in Sausage Valley, but killed in Courcelette, and specify that his body was never found? He could very well have been buried where he fell, which, ironically, was also how most of the dead at Pozieres were buried, too. This, of course, just leads to more questions. :confused:

It was not even 6 months later that my great-grandfather, his younger brother, entered the war, and became a stretcher-bearer. I still have to find out where he was posted, though - I don't think anybody in my family remembers. Oh well.

I just found that it was a nice way to end my day, with the finding of the information on my great-great-uncle.

What a way to remember, eh?

Gilshalos Sedai
11-13-2011, 08:30 AM
If it specifies that he was buried in Sausage Valley, that likely means that everyone in Courcelette who's bodies were recoverable were buried there. And since his unit was there, they just count him.

Khoram
11-13-2011, 11:30 AM
If it specifies that he was buried in Sausage Valley, that likely means that everyone in Courcelette who's bodies were recoverable were buried there. And since his unit was there, they just count him.

Probably. It would be nice, though, to find out, but that's pretty much an impossibility, unfortunately. At least, if there's no known final burial site. Still, I'll be able to look for his name on the Vimy Memorial. :)

Ishara
11-16-2011, 08:33 AM
Obviously a bit late here, but Maclean's did a series on the Korean War with the Memory Project where Canadian veterans of the Korean War (also known colloquially as the Forgotten War) got to talk about their experiences. It was a really interesting read.