PDA

View Full Version : Asphalt


Khoram
12-08-2011, 04:31 PM
So... I've been hired to fill in some potholes in a parking lot (I already work for these people with snow removal, so I don't mind the extra work, seeing as I don't have much else to do right now) and I have ABSOLUTELY NO IDEA WHAT TO DO!

What I'm getting at is, how much would you recommend for one gigantic, and other smaller holes, any specific ways to go about this in the cold North, and what type would you recommend?

Luckily, there hasn't been much snow lately, and I only referee at night, so I was planning on going tomorrow to the good ol' Canadian Tire to pick up some bags of asphalt and (hopefully) finish the work in the early afternoon.

It's easy, right? Please tell me I'm not in over my head! :(

There's one major pothole that I estimate to be about 1.5 ft. long, 1 ft. wide and about 5 in. deep - it's a damn big hole. The others are minor compared to that Leviathan of a hole.

Davian93
12-08-2011, 05:16 PM
They have this stuff called "hot patch" that works as a temporary asphalt patch...though it will rip up after maybe 1 season. You just pour it in and pound it down with a landscaping tool.

Other than that...um, good luck.

Sei'taer
12-08-2011, 05:21 PM
So... I've been hired to fill in some potholes in a parking lot (I already work for these people with snow removal, so I don't mind the extra work, seeing as I don't have much else to do right now) and I have ABSOLUTELY NO IDEA WHAT TO DO!

What I'm getting at is, how much would you recommend for one gigantic, and other smaller holes, any specific ways to go about this in the cold North, and what type would you recommend?

Luckily, there hasn't been much snow lately, and I only referee at night, so I was planning on going tomorrow to the good ol' Canadian Tire to pick up some bags of asphalt and (hopefully) finish the work in the early afternoon.

It's easy, right? Please tell me I'm not in over my head! :(

There's one major pothole that I estimate to be about 1.5 ft. long, 1 ft. wide and about 5 in. deep - it's a damn big hole. The others are minor compared to that Leviathan of a hole.

I'm guessing you just are being asked to do a temporary fix. Here we have something called cold mix that we use as a temp fix for potholes. It'll be hardpressed to make it thru the winter though. Any type of permanent fix and I'd say you're in over your head unless you have an asphalt saw, an asphalt roller with water tank and dripper, a spreader and access to hot mix.

I can tell you how to do it, but it's like telling someone how to make a 7/10 split and them actually doing it.

Davian93
12-08-2011, 05:42 PM
I'm guessing you just are being asked to do a temporary fix. Here we have something called cold mix that we use as a temp fix for potholes. It'll be hardpressed to make it thru the winter though. Any type of permanent fix and I'd say you're in over your head unless you have an asphalt saw, an asphalt roller with water tank and dripper, a spreader and access to hot mix.

I can tell you how to do it, but it's like telling someone how to make a 7/10 split and them actually doing it.

That's the crap I was thinking of...thought "hot patch" sounded wrong.

Crispin's Crispian
12-08-2011, 05:53 PM
That's the crap I was thinking of...thought "hot patch" sounded wrong.

Close. Hot vs. cold. Fix vs. patch.

Hot patch sounds like a jazz club.

Davian93
12-08-2011, 06:19 PM
Close. Hot vs. cold. Fix vs. patch.

Hot patch sounds like a jazz club.

LOL...yeah.

I dont have a ton of experience using the stuff...just once with a friend's driveway. As Taer says, I recall its just a temporary fix. I have a gravel driveway (crusher run mix) so I just use old wood/coal ash to patch holes. My coal stove ash seems to work really well actually.

Khoram
12-08-2011, 10:41 PM
Thanks, guys for the help.

I'll try this stuff I found at Canadian Tire - it's called Black Knight Pot-Hole Filler - based on what I've been reading about it, it seems fairly simple to use, and it's cold asphalt, so I don't have to worry too much. ;)

I'll let you know how it turns out - hopefully it doesn't go horribly wrong. :O *knock on wood*

Ivhon
12-09-2011, 12:12 AM
I'm guessing you just are being asked to do a temporary fix. Here we have something called cold mix that we use as a temp fix for potholes. It'll be hardpressed to make it thru the winter though. Any type of permanent fix and I'd say you're in over your head unless you have an asphalt saw, an asphalt roller with water tank and dripper, a spreader and access to hot mix.

I can tell you how to do it, but it's like telling someone how to make a 7/10 split and them actually doing it.

I hit a 7/10 split for the first time on Sunday night.

Sei'taer
12-09-2011, 09:59 AM
I hit a 7/10 split for the first time on Sunday night.

I've done it once too!


Thanks, guys for the help.

I'll try this stuff I found at Canadian Tire - it's called Black Knight Pot-Hole Filler - based on what I've been reading about it, it seems fairly simple to use, and it's cold asphalt, so I don't have to worry too much.

I'll let you know how it turns out - hopefully it doesn't go horribly wrong. :O *knock on wood*

I looked it up and that's basically the same stuff I was talking about. I can't stress enough about compaction. Beat it in with your shovel, jump on it, drive over it, anything you can do to compact it. There's no such thing as too much with cold mix. The better you get it in there the longer it'll last. One tip, get a board that is wider than the hole (technically it's called a screed board) and use it to slide across the patch to even the patch, then tamp it, put some more in and screed it again and tamp it until you get it full. A 2x4 standing on edge is a great screed board.

Watch this guy, he's using a vibrating screed on concrete, but it's the same basic idea. Overlap on both sides and pull towards yourself to get the stuff level and then compact.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRK3wqYAoDo

Davian93
12-09-2011, 10:53 AM
http://www.homedepot.com/Outdoors-Garden-Center-Garden-Tools-Diggers-Tampers/h_d1/N-5yc1vZbx7o/R-202054873/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053

This is what we used...seemed to work okay.

Zanguini
12-10-2011, 01:24 AM
I wouldnt trust them if they lie about bowling who knows what they will lie about.

Khoram
12-10-2011, 09:26 AM
I wouldnt trust them if they lie about bowling who knows what they will lie about.

So what would you say I do, Zan? :D

Khoram
12-11-2011, 11:15 PM
So here's (http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150504402875804&set=a.10150504402765804.419058.598025803&type=3&theater) the major pothole... I wrote a bit about it in the description.

And here's (http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150504406605804&set=a.10150504402765804.419058.598025803&type=3&permPage=1) the "finished product". Obviously it could use more work, and I'll be going back in on Wednesday to fill in other, smaller potholes (it's supposed to be nice). The tamper I was using ended up breaking on me, so I had to get in the car and drive over multiple times. I could tell when I was going over it by the feel, but it's wasn't too bad, and I even stopped on top of the pothole, just to use the weight of the car to help it settle; I thought it might work. :D

The pictures aren't the best quality, and the second one looks crappy because of the different angle and the fact that it's brighter outside. Like I said in the description, I think that the entire area should be completely turned over and repaved, but that isn't for me to decide.

ETA: Sei - I couldn't figure out how I'd be able to screed the hole - the stuff I was using was all molded together and would either stay clumped up or completely fall apart in my hands, so I would have screed had I been able to figure out what to do with what I had. So it ain't even, but nobody's complaining about the large pothole in the parking lot anymore, so it's all good with me. :D

Sei'taer
12-11-2011, 11:48 PM
So here's (http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150504402875804&set=a.10150504402765804.419058.598025803&type=3&theater) the major pothole... I wrote a bit about it in the description.

And here's (http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150504406605804&set=a.10150504402765804.419058.598025803&type=3&permPage=1) the "finished product". Obviously it could use more work, and I'll be going back in on Wednesday to fill in other, smaller potholes (it's supposed to be nice). The tamper I was using ended up breaking on me, so I had to get in the car and drive over multiple times. I could tell when I was going over it by the feel, but it's wasn't too bad, and I even stopped on top of the pothole, just to use the weight of the car to help it settle; I thought it might work. :D

The pictures aren't the best quality, and the second one looks crappy because of the different angle and the fact that it's brighter outside. Like I said in the description, I think that the entire area should be completely turned over and repaved, but that isn't for me to decide.

ETA: Sei - I couldn't figure out how I'd be able to screed the hole - the stuff I was using was all molded together and would either stay clumped up or completely fall apart in my hands, so I would have screed had I been able to figure out what to do with what I had. So it ain't even, but nobody's complaining about the large pothole in the parking lot anymore, so it's all good with me. :D

For what you had to work with, I'd say that was a pretty good job. All of that alligatored crap needs to come out and the whole thing repaved. If you pave over the alligatored areas then it will just come back in the new asphalt, it's better to remove it all and start new. From the looks of it, the original asphalt is the wrong mix to begin with...it's pretty far off too, since I can tell just from the pictures of the original hole. Even a parking lot deserves better asphalt than that, but a lot of businesses figure they'll save money on the front end, even if they have to lose it on the back end.

Khoram
12-11-2011, 11:59 PM
And then people complain about how poor the parking lot's condition is, and then they get people like me to fix them temporarily, and thus the cycle continues. I ddn't end up working too long on this - including buying the bags of cold asphalt, I spent 3 hours. I could have easily spent more, but it was cold outside, and I had to get home to study for an exam comin up on Tuesday. XD

Had I completely pulled up those other pieces around the hole, I would have easily spent $100, maybe even closer to $200, on the asphalt alone. And then spent another two or three hours outside working on it. At least I had a car handy to get in if I got too cold. :D

Now that I look at the second picture again, closer to the $500-600 range, which I don't have available to me right now, and closer to spending a couple of days (hours wise) working on this thing. It's a good thin I didn't go any bigger. :/

Davian93
12-12-2011, 09:14 AM
'Taer, you should see the road my house is off of...they did a "cheap, quick fix" paving it before winter and you can already seeing it ripping back up. Instead of repaving the entire road, they just did really big, long patches on each lane side but left the original asphalt in the middle with the yellow lines and a good 4-5 foot gap between the two "patches". They also left the better paved portions and only redid the really, really bad parts. For most of the summer, we would drive in the middle as that was the only decent paved part (its a low traffic road so this isn't an issue) and sometimes we'd drive on the wrong side if there were major potholes on the correct side of the road. Still, you can alraedy see where the plow blades of ripped up pieces where the new asphalt ends and the old asphalt is underneath. The blade is just shaving it off.

So, they'll have to completely repave the road again next summer.

Ishara
12-12-2011, 09:49 AM
Yeah - cold fix patches almost never last the whole season here. Between the constant expansion/ shrinking of the actual asphalt because of weather, the copious amounts of salt they pour on the roads and the snow plows with their plows set just a bit too low that end up catching the leading edge of the fix, those holes are usually bigger come March. LOL

Khoram
12-12-2011, 10:29 AM
Yeah - cold fix patches almost never last the whole season here. Between the constant expansion/ shrinking of the actual asphalt because of weather, the copious amounts of salt they pour on the roads and the snow plows with their plows set just a bit too low that end up catching the leading edge of the fix, those holes are usually bigger come March. LOL

Yeah... I don't plan on being around to fix them then. Besides, I wouldn't have the time - end of school, exams, that sort of thing going on at that time.

Wait...

That's what's going on NOW! :eek:

I still don't plan on being around to repave then. :/

Sei'taer
12-12-2011, 10:49 AM
Asphalts tricky stuff, it doesn't get solid so it expands and contracts and moves constantly (everybody's seen the ruts as you pull up to a major intersection). If you don't get the right mix or do a crummy job of fixing it before a repair then it just moves and cracks and falls to pieces. It was probably one of my least favorite things to inspect because of how easy it is to cheat and use shit instead of what would work best.

Zombie Sammael
12-12-2011, 06:28 PM
Looks a little bitter in the pics. I should sweeten it (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ft1lxiWFbDk).