PDA

View Full Version : Poll: Should Brandon Write the Outriggers?


Davian93
12-22-2011, 08:04 AM
Well, given the stark positions in the other thread, I thought a poll would be interesting...

WinespringBrother
12-22-2011, 08:24 AM
I voted no, because even though I'd like to see outriggers, it seems like Brandon would rather continue the books in his cosmology, which makes sense.

DahLliA
12-22-2011, 08:43 AM
voted no. not sure why, but just doesn't feel like it's a good idea

Davian93
12-22-2011, 08:57 AM
I originally thought about putting a 2nd "No" category with the caveat of "Let Brandon write his own stuff" but decided against it as that was inherent in the other "No" category.

Thom Merrilin
12-22-2011, 09:04 AM
No. I don't think it's right to be honest. Brandon has reservations about it as well. I think most are happy with it ending on aMoL, and the encyclopedia sometime in 2013.

Zombie Sammael
12-22-2011, 09:37 AM
I haven't voted, because as I said in the other thread, I feel like it's something that shouldn't be closed off but maybe ought to be considered in several years time, if there's still demand, if Brandon still wants to do them, and if Harriet feels it's appropriate. Writing them straight away would, I think, be inappropriate to the legacy of RJ and unfair on Brandon who has his own legitimate career outside of WOT, but he is the only writer I would want writing WOT-based fiction. I think they need to leave it for a bit after AMOL and see how everyone feels in a while.

Tercel
12-22-2011, 01:58 PM
1) I felt New Spring was a really awesome work that greatly added value to the WOT series. It helpfully 'filled in' some of the backstory and expanded upon hints and allusions in the main books. If any of the considered 'outriggers' have the potential to do the same, then as a fan of the series, I should dearly love that they be written.

2) RJ clearly didn't want a 'shared' world like Star Trek where every man and his dog writes a book set in his world. The WOT world was RJ's world, and so I think no book should be written in that world unless RJ himself created its plot. There should be no 'money-spinners', ie no random fantasy authors creating their own books that happen to be set in RJ's world and exploit the popularity of his world for their own sales. RJ gave permission for his WOT legacy to be completed by another carefully chosen author. I therefore see the mandate on Brandon as being to complete any WOT books for which RJ left a plot outline. This would be a valid completion of RJ's work, by making his WOT world contain precisely the books he had imagined it would have eventually contained had he lived to write them, and they are RJ's books as he has created the plot and the world in which they are set.

Hence I voted "yes". The outriggers, that were specifically imagined by RJ before his death and for which he has left plot outlines, ought to be written.

Terez
12-22-2011, 06:10 PM
I'm not going to vote. I would like for them to be written some day, but as others have said, it depends on the approach. Obviously Brandon wants to get back to writing his own stuff, but on the other hand, he likes to do different things sometimes to get (or keep) his creative juices flowing. I can see him enjoying taking a trip back into WoT-land between SA books a few years down the road.

Khoram
12-22-2011, 06:32 PM
As much as I would love to see these outriggers written, I voted "no" for many of the same reasons stated above.

However, if they ARE picked up down the line, and by a worthy author (such as Brandon) then I will change my mind. ;)

As it stands now, I am completely satisfied with aMoL and the Encyclopaedia.

GonzoTheGreat
12-23-2011, 02:48 AM
Why isn't there a "Who is Brandon?" option in the poll?

Mort
12-23-2011, 02:59 AM
Why isn't there a "Who is Brandon?" option in the poll?

I got confused about the whole "WoT" part, what the hell is that?

Zombie Sammael
12-23-2011, 04:21 AM
I got confused about the whole "WoT" part, what the hell is that?

What is "writing", and how does one do it? Is there normally a moral element to it?

Terez
12-23-2011, 04:36 AM
Perhaps one of you knows what 'outrigger' means.

GonzoTheGreat
12-23-2011, 04:44 AM
Perhaps one of you knows what 'outrigger' means.
That's part of a ship, isn't it?
Usually you build them, or attach one that someone else has made earlier. I'm not sure an outrigger that is merely written would be solid enough.

Mort
12-23-2011, 09:35 AM
Perhaps one of you knows what 'outrigger' means.

Maybe, but I ain't tellin.

I'm not sure an outrigger that is merely written would be solid enough.

What if you used a really strong font?

jana
12-23-2011, 11:52 AM
I need an undecided. I want them but I don't.

The Unreasoner
12-26-2011, 02:52 PM
I voted no. I want them written, but I just think it could be by someone new. Why can't we see who voted on what?

Seeker
12-26-2011, 03:04 PM
I haven't voted, because as I said in the other thread, I feel like it's something that shouldn't be closed off but maybe ought to be considered in several years time, if there's still demand, if Brandon still wants to do them, and if Harriet feels it's appropriate. Writing them straight away would, I think, be inappropriate to the legacy of RJ and unfair on Brandon who has his own legitimate career outside of WOT, but he is the only writer I would want writing WOT-based fiction. I think they need to leave it for a bit after AMOL and see how everyone feels in a while.

I agree with this statement.

Lupusdeusest
12-26-2011, 07:32 PM
I voted Harriet, but mainly as i believe Harriet should have the final word on it. Other people may write in the seriesm but it is still RJ's and as such contains as much Harriet as RJ.

Tomp
12-26-2011, 09:59 PM
I would say

NO to more books and movies/tv that is other stories than the series as we know it (or will come end of next year).

Maybe YES to video games that take place in other time periods than the one in the book for example during Hawkwings empire or the trolloc wars. These would obviously not be part of the canon of the series.

yks 6nnetu hing
12-27-2011, 01:59 AM
No. for 3 reasons:
1) It feels... wrong to have anyone besides RJ write the outriggers, which (as far as I understand) are in an even less finished state than AMoL was when Brandon started
2) I really like Brandon´s own work and want to read that!
3) the outriggers were going to be about Mat and Tuon. yuck. annnnyone else would be better. Even endless Perrin-Faile escapades. Although perhaps not Elayne's Baths.

Terez
12-27-2011, 02:07 AM
I have always leaned toward wanting the prequels finished, but not the outriggers, partly because the prequels were planned to happen in the middle of the story we already have, so it just seems like unfinished business. The outriggers, not so much. Clearly there are a few things that were planned for it that they'll have to lay out for us in bare-bones fashion, but it's like a whole other story, and we have no idea what it was going to be about (yet - I assume we'll have a clue after reading AMOL). But we have a pretty good idea what the prequels were to be about, and it's more like filling in a hole that RJ left.

Problem is, Tom Doherty wants the outriggers. Why? He's a Mat fan. And so it goes in the publishing business...(and hence we'll probably get neither).

Zombie Sammael
12-27-2011, 07:17 AM
Having just finished Way Of Kings, my answer has changed to "no". Frankly, I want more new and interesting fantasy series far more than I want more WOT.

Seeker
12-27-2011, 08:07 AM
I have always leaned toward wanting the prequels finished, but not the outriggers, partly because the prequels were planned to happen in the middle of the story we already have, so it just seems like unfinished business. The outriggers, not so much. Clearly there are a few things that were planned for it that they'll have to lay out for us in bare-bones fashion, but it's like a whole other story, and we have no idea what it was going to be about (yet - I assume we'll have a clue after reading AMOL). But we have a pretty good idea what the prequels were to be about, and it's more like filling in a hole that RJ left.

Problem is, Tom Doherty wants the outriggers. Why? He's a Mat fan. And so it goes in the publishing business...(and hence we'll probably get neither).

Prequels tend to ruin things. They're almost always a bad idea and, in my opinion, New Spring was no exception. While it avoided contradicting the plot - something that prequels are notorious for - it didn't really add anything new to the series. Turning back-story into actual story is usually boring because the audience already knows how it's gonna go.

Davian93
12-27-2011, 08:11 AM
When prequels go bad...

http://www.411mania.com/siteimages/jake_lloyd_67313.jpg

fdsaf3
12-27-2011, 09:32 AM
I'd say that if they are going to happen (and if they are going to make sense), they should happen sooner than later. Waiting to write them would seem to diminish the impact a bit, in my opinion.

I understand that Brandon is an author who has his own books to write. It's a tough thing to ask someone to continue writing in a voice that isn't entirely his own. Brandon said something to the effect of how he didn't want to imitate RJ's style while writing the WoT books; I feel like the outriggers would be more likely to fall into the imitation category than the main series books simply because they aren't as fleshed out. I feel like they would either be Brandon imitating RJ's writing (bad), or the books being Brandon's writing style using RJ's material. I feel like most fans of the main series books would object to this: they want RJ's "voice". There has been criticism of Brandon's voice being really different than RJ's in the last few books.

I see this as a lose-lose situation for Brandon. If I were him, I'd stay away. He got to finish one of the most epic fantasy series of all time. Go out on a high note and let the WOT series go.

Seeker
12-27-2011, 09:51 AM
When prequels go bad...

http://www.411mania.com/siteimages/jake_lloyd_67313.jpg

Poor Jake Lloyd.

Res_Ipsa
12-27-2011, 10:30 AM
Poor Jake Lloyd.

Poor all of those actors bc George Lucas was the screenwriter.

Immaculate conception. Nuff said George, and Han shot first!

Khoram
12-27-2011, 11:40 AM
Poor Jake Lloyd.

Was he ever in anything else?

GonzoTheGreat
12-27-2011, 11:50 AM
Was he ever in anything else?
RAFO (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jake_Lloyd).

Khoram
12-27-2011, 12:04 PM
RAFO (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jake_Lloyd).

So no.

JOS
12-27-2011, 03:35 PM
Thank You Brandon for finishing the series! While I would enjoy more content, it just doesn't feel right.

Terez
12-27-2011, 05:17 PM
Prequels tend to ruin things. They're almost always a bad idea and, in my opinion, New Spring was no exception. While it avoided contradicting the plot - something that prequels are notorious for - it didn't really add anything new to the series. Turning back-story into actual story is usually boring because the audience already knows how it's gonna go.That's your opinion, and not a very widely-shared one in my experience.

jana
12-27-2011, 09:09 PM
Honestly, as many complaints as I have, I'm glad we have the Star Wars prequels. I'd rather have them with horrible flaws than not have them at all.

But if George Lucas had died before they'd been made, I would have been vehemently against it. The idea is crazy. Especially because before the prequels were made, I still respected him. The Greedo thing is irritating but not as irritating as Padme and Anakin interacting.



That's your opinion, and not a very widely-shared one in my experience.

Agreed, though it's always been hard for me to judge how good New Spring is because two of the characters in it are two of my three favorite characters.

GonzoTheGreat
12-28-2011, 03:52 AM
But if George Lucas had died before they'd been made, I would have been vehemently against it. The idea is crazy. Especially because before the prequels were made, I still respected him. The Greedo thing is irritating but not as irritating as Padme and Anakin interacting.
If only they'd been actually acting. :rolleyes:

jana
12-28-2011, 11:34 AM
If only they'd been actually acting. :rolleyes:

I blame Lucas for that, because I've seen both of them in other movies

Zombie Sammael
12-28-2011, 11:42 AM
The Star Wars prequels are not the be all and end all of prequels. In a sense, The Silmarillion was a prequel to Lord of the Rings (in that it was published afterwards) and is of comparable quality, if heftier in style and subject matter. There are many other examples. What is more worrying to a word-nerd like me is the misappropriation of the term "prequel" to mean anything set before a work, including things actually made before that work. The Hobbit is not a prequel to LOTR, for example.

Seeker
12-28-2011, 08:56 PM
Honestly, as many complaints as I have, I'm glad we have the Star Wars prequels. I'd rather have them with horrible flaws than not have them at all.

But if George Lucas had died before they'd been made, I would have been vehemently against it. The idea is crazy. Especially because before the prequels were made, I still respected him. The Greedo thing is irritating but not as irritating as Padme and Anakin interacting.

I have only one thing to say to you, my friend.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FxKtZmQgxrI

E-mail me if you want a pizza roll. Post a comment on this web-zone if you want a pizza roll.

Zaela Sedai
12-28-2011, 09:06 PM
I just want the other two prequels. It can stop there

Sei'taer
12-28-2011, 10:45 PM
I want Manetheren. Other than this, I really don't care about the others. The only one that might be worth it is the story about the fall of Malkier.




“To the south,” Moiraine said, “lies the river you call the White River, but far to the east of here men call it still by its rightful name. Manetherendrelle. In the Old Tongue, Waters of the Mountain Home. Sparkling waters that once coursed through a land of bravery and beauty. Two thousand years ago Manetherendrelle flowed by the walls of a mountain city so lovely to behold that Ogier stonemasons came to stare in wonder. Farms and villages covered this region, and what you call the Forest of Shadows, as well, and beyond. But all of those folk thought of themselves as the people of the Mountain Home, the people of Manetheren.

“Their King was Aemon al Caar al Thorin, Aemon son of Caar son of Thorin, and Eldrene ay Ellan ay Carlan was his Queen. Aemon, a man so fearless that the greatest compliment for courage any could give, even among his enemies, was to say a man had Aemon’s heart. Eldrene, so beautiful that it was said the flowers bloomed to make her smile. Bravery and beauty and wisdom and a love that death could not sunder. Weep, if you have a heart, for the loss of them, for the loss of even their memory. Weep, for the loss of their blood.”

She fell silent then, but no one spoke. Rand was as bound as the others in the spell she had created. When she spoke again, he drank it in, and so did the rest.

“For nearly two centuries the Trolloc Wars had ravaged the length and breadth of the world, and wherever battles raged, the Red Eagle banner of Manetheren was in the forefront. The men of Manetheren were a thorn to the Dark One’s foot and a bramble to his hand. Sing of Manetheren, that would never bend knee to the Shadow. Sing of Manetheren, the sword that could not be broken.

“They were far away, the men of Manetheren, on the Field of Bekkar, called the Field of Blood, when news came that a Trolloc army was moving against their home. Too far to do else but wait to hear of their land’s death, for the forces of the Dark One meant to make an end of them. Kill the mighty oak by hacking away its roots. Too far to do else but mourn. But they were the men of the Mountain Home.

“Without hesitation, without thought for the distance they must travel, they marched from the very field of victory, still covered in dust and sweat and blood. Day and night they marched, for they had seen the horror a Trolloc army left behind it, and no man of them could sleep while such a danger threatened Manetheren. They moved as if their feet had wings, marching further and faster than friends hoped or enemies feared they could. At any other day that march alone would have inspired songs. When the Dark One’s armies swooped down upon the lands of Manetheren, the men of the Mountain Home stood before it, with their backs to the Tarendrelle.”

Some villager raised a small cheer then, but Moiraine kept on as if she had not heard. “The host that faced the men of Manetheren was enough to daunt the bravest heart. Ravens blackened the sky; Trollocs blackened the land. Trollocs and their human allies. Trollocs and Darkfriends in tens of tens of thousands, and Dreadlords to command. At night their cookfires outnumbered the stars, and dawn revealed the banner of Ba’alzamon at their head. Ba’alzamon, Heart of the Dark. An ancient name for the Father of Lies. The Dark One could not have been free of his prison at Shayol Ghul, for if he had been, not all the forces of humankind together could have stood against him, but there was power there. Dreadlords, and some evil that made that light-destroying banner seem no more than right and sent a chill into the souls of the men who faced it.

“Yet, they knew what they must do. Their homeland lay just across the river. They must keep that host, and the power with it, from the Mountain Home. Aemon had sent out messengers. Aid was promised if they could hold for but three days at the Tarendrelle. Hold for three days against odds that should overwhelm them in the first hour. Yet somehow, through bloody assault and desperate defense, they held through an hour, and the second hour, and the third. For three days they fought, and though the land became a butcher’s yard, no crossing of the Tarendrelle did they yield. By the third night no help had come, and no messengers, and they fought on alone. For six days. For nine. And on the tenth day Aemon knew the bitter taste of betrayal. No help was coming, and they could hold the river crossings no more.”

“What did they do?” Hari demanded. Torchfires flickered in the chill night breeze, but no one made a move to draw a cloak tighter.

“Aemon crossed the Tarendrelle,” Moiraine told them, “destroying the bridges behind him. And he sent word throughout his land for the people to flee, for he knew the powers with the Trolloc horde would find a way to bring it across the river. Even as the word went out, the Trolloc crossing began, and the soldiers of Manetheren took up the fight again, to buy with their lives what hours they could for their people to escape. From the city of Manetheren, Eldrene organized the flight of her people into the deepest forests and the fastness of the mountains.

“But some did not flee. First in a trickle, then a river, then a flood, men went, not to safety, but to join the army fighting for their land. Shepherds with bows, and farmers with pitchforks, and woodsmen with axes. Women went, too, shouldering what weapons they could find and marching side by side with their men. No one made that journey who did not know they would never return. But it was their land. It had been their fathers’, and it would be their children’s, and they went to pay the price of it. Not a step of ground was given up until it was soaked in blood, but at the last the army of Manetheren was driven back, back to here, to this place you now call Emond’s Field. And here the Trolloc hordes surrounded them.”

Her voice held the sound of cold tears. “Trolloc dead and the corpses of human renegades piled up in mounds, but always more scrambled over those charnel heaps in waves of death that had no end. There could be but one finish. No man or woman who had stood beneath the banner of the Red Eagle at that day’s dawning still lived when night fell. The sword that could not be broken was shattered.

“In the Mountains of Mist, alone in the emptied city of Manetheren, Eldrene felt Aemon die, and her heart died with him. And where her heart had been was left only a thirst for vengeance, vengeance for her love, vengeance for her people and her land. Driven by grief she reached out to the True Source, and hurled the One Power at the Trolloc army. And there the Dreadlords died wherever they stood, whether in their secret councils or exhorting their soldiers. In the passing of a breath the Dreadlords and the generals of the Dark One’s host burst into flame. Fire consumed their bodies, and terror consumed their just-victorious army.

“Now they ran like beasts before a wildfire in the forest, with no thought for anything but escape. North and south they fled. Thousands drowned attempting to cross the Tarendrelle without the aid of the Dreadlords, and at the Manetherendrelle they tore down the bridges in their fright at what might be following them. Where they found people, they slew and burned, but to flee was the need that gripped them. Until, at last, no one of them remained in the lands of Manetheren. They were dispersed like dust before the whirlwind. The final vengeance came more slowly, but it came, when they were hunted down by other peoples, by other armies in other lands. None was left alive of those who did murder at Aemon’s Field.

“But the price was high for Manetheren. Eldrene had drawn to herself more of the One Power than any human could ever hope to wield unaided. As the enemy generals died, so did she die, and the fires that consumed her consumed the empty city of Manetheren, even the stones of it, down to the living rock of the mountains. Yet the people had been saved.

“Nothing was left of their farms, their villages, or their great city. Some would say there was nothing left for them, nothing but to flee to other lands, where they could begin anew. They did not say so. They had paid such a price in blood and hope for their land as had never been paid before, and now they were bound to that soil by ties stronger than steel. Other wars would wrack them in years to come, until at last their corner of the world was forgotten and at last they had forgotten wars and the ways of war. Never again did Manetheren rise. Its soaring spires and splashing fountains became as a dream that slowly faded from the minds of its people. But they, and their children, and their children’s children, held the land that was theirs. They held it when the long centuries had washed the why of it from their memories. They held it until, today, there is you. Weep for Manetheren. Weep for what is lost forever.”

Terez
12-28-2011, 11:46 PM
Really, I think that writing a story about Manetheren would diminish the impact of Moiraine story (which was, of course, pure prose genius).

Lupusdeusest
12-29-2011, 07:34 AM
Really, I think that writing a story about Manetheren would diminish the impact of Moiraine story (which was, of course, pure prose genius).

I think it's quite possibly my favourite passage from all the books together. Amazing work.

Seeker
12-29-2011, 02:34 PM
The more suggestions I hear, the more I think it's time to just put WOT to rest and move on to other fantasy.

Prequels would be a horrible, horrible idea. And to satisfy Zombie Sammael, I'm going to define prequels as specifically those stories that take back-story from previously-established books/films and use that as their main plot line.

So, no, The Hobbit is not a prequel to The Lord of the Rings but neither is Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom a prequel to Raiders of the Lost Ark even though the former precedes the latter chronologically. And why? Because the plot of Temple of Doom is not based on back-story that was laid out in Raiders. Meaning that it's a brand-new story that just happens to be set before the original film.

The Star Wars prequels are prequels because they are based on back-story that was used as exposition in the Original Trilogy, mainly the fall of Anakin Skywalker.

Okay, so why do Prequels suck? Well, they suck BECAUSE they are based on previously-established back-story, which means that we in the audience already know how this is going to end. We already know that Anakin is going to become Darth Vader and kill all the Jedi; the question of how he falls is really not worth exploring since nothing the screenwriter can create will live up to the expectations we have in our minds. When Ben Kenobi tells Luke of the "death" of his father, we have a mental image of a great war in which a legendary hero falls into temptation and darkness. And then we see the actual event and it sucks. (Yes, the prequels are objectively bad films but even if they were good films, they still wouldn't live up to our expectations).

So, let's look at New Spring

Okay, on the night before she was raised Aes Sedai, Moiraine hears Gitara foretell the birth of the Dragon.

Yup, we knew that as per The Great Hunt. And the scene really wasn't any different from what I had imagined in the first place.

Then Moiraine takes her test. Haven't seen that before but it's not worth the rest of the book.

She goes to the borderlands to find the baby Dragon. Yup, we knew about that as per her conversations with Lan. She meets Lan and dumps a river on him. We knew about that as well. Once again, it's in the Great Hunt. Seeing it for ourselves doesn't actually add to the comedic effect.

Moiraine meets Cads. We knew about that from some of Cadsuane's musings in Crown of Swords.. And then Moiraine has a channeling battle with some random Black Sister, which - and I'm quoting the book here - would have appeared to any outside observer as merely two women staring at each other.

And none of it matters anyway since we know she's not going to find Rand for another 20 years. So, really, why does this need to be in print?

And really, what's the Tam al'Thor story gonna be?

Tam leaves the Two Rivers.
Tam goes to Illian.
Tam joins the Companions and fights in some of Illian's wars.
Tam goes north for the Aiel War, meets a nice girl and marries her.
Tam finds a baby on the slopes of Dragonmount.

The end.

WE ALREADY KNOW THIS!

Prequels suck.

Don't do them.

In fact, don't do any new Wot. I think it's time to put this series to rest.

Zombie Sammael
12-29-2011, 03:45 PM
I agree with you Seeker, but I have a bit I'd like to add.

The more suggestions I hear, the more I think it's time to just put WOT to rest and move on to other fantasy.

Prequels would be a horrible, horrible idea. And to satisfy Zombie Sammael, I'm going to define prequels as specifically those stories that take back-story from previously-established books/films and use that as their main plot line.

So, no, The Hobbit is not a prequel to The Lord of the Rings but neither is Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom a prequel to Raiders of the Lost Ark even though the former precedes the latter chronologically. And why? Because the plot of Temple of Doom is not based on back-story that was laid out in Raiders. Meaning that it's a brand-new story that just happens to be set before the original film.

This is kinda important to what you say later on about Tam. I would define a prequel as simply a story made after but set before the previous instalment, so Temple of Doom would be a prequel to Raiders, just as (to name a VERY good example of a prequel) Kingdom Hearts: Birth By Sleep is a prequel to Kingdom Hearts.

The Star Wars prequels are prequels because they are based on back-story that was used as exposition in the Original Trilogy, mainly the fall of Anakin Skywalker.

Okay, so why do Prequels suck? Well, they suck BECAUSE they are based on previously-established back-story, which means that we in the audience already know how this is going to end. We already know that Anakin is going to become Darth Vader and kill all the Jedi; the question of how he falls is really not worth exploring since nothing the screenwriter can create will live up to the expectations we have in our minds. When Ben Kenobi tells Luke of the "death" of his father, we have a mental image of a great war in which a legendary hero falls into temptation and darkness. And then we see the actual event and it sucks. (Yes, the prequels are objectively bad films but even if they were good films, they still wouldn't live up to our expectations).

A prequel succeeds when it discloses information that isn't contained within the body of the main story. This is part of the reason why the Star Wars prequels are only partially successful; most of the information contained therein was already available to fans, and what wasn't felt relatively unimportant. A prequel has to tell a new story but still be set in the old world.

So, let's look at New Spring

Okay, on the night before she was raised Aes Sedai, Moiraine hears Gitara foretell the birth of the Dragon.

Yup, we knew that as per The Great Hunt. And the scene really wasn't any different from what I had imagined in the first place.

Then Moiraine takes her test. Haven't seen that before but it's not worth the rest of the book.

I'd actually say that revealing this in New Spring takes away from the revelation in the main series when Nynaeve goes through the test. It's as if a prequel featuring Siuan's accepted test came out just before TGH.

She goes to the borderlands to find the baby Dragon. Yup, we knew about that as per her conversations with Lan. She meets Lan and dumps a river on him. We knew about that as well. Once again, it's in the Great Hunt. Seeing it for ourselves doesn't actually add to the comedic effect.

Moiraine meets Cads. We knew about that from some of Cadsuane's musings in Crown of Swords.. And then Moiraine has a channeling battle with some random Black Sister, which - and I'm quoting the book here - would have appeared to any outside observer as merely two women staring at each other.

And none of it matters anyway since we know she's not going to find Rand for another 20 years. So, really, why does this need to be in print?

It would matter if, in fact, it detailed any of Moiraine's adventures in full, doing things that weren't important enough to the main story to form part of the story, but were still interesting in their own right. It doesn't, and the new information it gives us minimal, as you rightly point out.

And really, what's the Tam al'Thor story gonna be?

Tam leaves the Two Rivers.
Tam goes to Illian.
Tam joins the Companions and fights in some of Illian's wars.
Tam goes north for the Aiel War, meets a nice girl and marries her.
Tam finds a baby on the slopes of Dragonmount.

The end.

WE ALREADY KNOW THIS!

Prequels suck.

Don't do them.

In fact, don't do any new Wot. I think it's time to put this series to rest.

In order to work successfully as a prequel or series of prequels, the Tam stories would need to contain a large amount of information outside of what you'd listed. Ideally, there would need to be new villains separate from those who appear in the story, but just as dastardly, or the villains that appear in the story would have to be doing things we don't already know about. The hero's - Tam - relationships would have to take place with people we've not been introduced to. We'd have to learn a lot about Kari al'Thor and who she really was.

Prequels that work that spring to mind (both video games) are KH: BBS, as mentioned above, and Final Fantasy VII: Crisis Core. Both introduce new villains and have a threat level as great as those in the original stories. Both reveal new information about the protagonists while also using the information we already have without being a slave to it. Both tell use more about the world and setting but don't contradict what we know. Neither takes anything away from the original. The Tam prequels would need to do this. I'm not sure they can. The only workable villains in the WOT series are the Shadow and Shadar Logoth; the former is largely bound while the latter remains ruined until TEOTW, and I think a story where Mordeth got out only to be put back again would take away from the main story.

I can see prequels set during the Trolloc Wars, or the War of the Hundred Years, but I personally think these are better settings for a WOT-MMO than books (I actually have one or two ideas on how to do an MMO, not that anyone's listening to me). I would much rather Brandon be continuing his own series, which have a richness and depth worthy as successors to WOT IMO.

Terez
12-29-2011, 05:16 PM
I'd actually say that revealing this in New Spring takes away from the revelation in the main series when Nynaeve goes through the test. It's as if a prequel featuring Siuan's accepted test came out just before TGH.There's a reason for that:
INTERVIEW:May 24th, 2004Fantasy Magazine Interview with Robert Jordan (http://www.fantasymagazine.it/interviste/5255#english)


CHIARA CODECÀ
I know that you are working on the eleventh book of the Wheel of Time series, Knife of Dreams.


ROBERT JORDAN
Yes, but there’s no way I’ll tell you anything else about it.

CHIARA CODECÀ
Tell me something about the prequel, then, New Spring. I know it was originally a short novel you published in 1998.

ROBERT JORDAN
Yes, but it’s not an expansion. The novel New Spring is what I wanted to write in the first place, but I realized that Robert Silverberg would get very angry if I’d sent him a 120,000 words to put in his anthology! So I did a lot of cutting and I made it fits into the anthology, but I still had that novel waiting to be written and I wanted to write it because there was a lot to be said that really fits into the rest of the series.

Even if the prequel has only two storylines while my normal books have four or five storylines there are things that you will not see anywhere else, such as the test for Aes Sedai. You actually see someone take the test for Aes Sedai and you learn how that is done: I have no intention to ever showing it anywhere else.

Also there are clues in New Spring not only as to why certain people hate each other in the main sequence books, but why certain people die in the main sequence books, and I’m not going to put the evidence anywhere else because I’ve already given it here.

CHIARA CODECÀ
That’s why you decided to publish the prequel before the end of the series?

ROBERT JORDAN
Well, I decided to published New Spring before going on because my publisher asked me to do it, but in retrospect that was probably a mistake. I shouldn’t have. It won’t happen again, though, I’ll work on the next two prequels only after I’ve finished the main sequence books.

Zombie Sammael
12-29-2011, 05:28 PM
That's weird. So was it Brandon's decision to include it, do you think, or was it a case of the tale growing in the telling?

Terez
12-29-2011, 06:05 PM
Considering the timing and the certainty of RJ's comments, almost certainly the former. We just found this interview, so Brandon probably hadn't seen it. (It's not in the old database, but it's in the new one, which will be up on the 1st.) We didn't even know RJ had gone to Italy, but Marie found several reports along with that interview.

Rand al'Fain
12-30-2011, 03:48 AM
Not so much interested in prequels, personally, but more of what happens to the characters after TG. A book detailing the Trolloc Wars and the War of a Hundred Years would be interesting, as those basically set up future events, if in a less direct way, but they would be interesting.

But that's just my take.

Morsker
01-17-2012, 08:50 AM
Considering the timing and the certainty of RJ's comments, almost certainly the former. We just found this interview, so Brandon probably hadn't seen it. (It's not in the old database, but it's in the new one, which will be up on the 1st.) We didn't even know RJ had gone to Italy, but Marie found several reports along with that interview.
I don't know where it was circulated and where it wasn't, but I read an English translation of that interview in 2004. It was remarkable because it's the first time I saw RJ respond defensively to criticism; he's trying to justify New Spring. Previously he'd always dismissed criticisms of the series with insults.

I remembered it while reading Nynaeve's scene in ToM too, and wondered why Brandon changed the policy on including that information. At the time, I figured Brandon expanded Nynaeve's section for pacing reasons.

Terez
01-17-2012, 11:57 AM
I don't know where it was circulated and where it wasn't, but I read an English translation of that interview in 2004. It was remarkable because it's the first time I saw RJ respond defensively to criticism; he's trying to justify New Spring. Previously he'd always dismissed criticisms of the series with insults.Well, I have organized all of RJ's available interviews and I haven't seen much in the way of 'insults'. I did note that he changed his response to criticism, but the closest thing to an 'insult' I have is this:

INTERVIEW:Jun 28th, 1997DragonCon SciFi Channel Chat (http://groups.google.com/group/rec.arts.sf.written.robert-jordan/msg/f71e8869a978604f)


BONDOSO
Mr. Jordan, how do you feel when someone finds a minor or perhaps a major inconsistency in your books? (I'm not saying there are any. :P) Do you say, "oh well, better luck next time," or do you get really upset?


ROBERT JORDAN
Sometimes people have found things that are typos, and sometimes people have found a place where a change or correction that I had intended to be put into the book was not before it was published. I always try to get those corrected as soon as possible after they're found. And, while I don't like having them there, I'm glad when someone points one out to me.

As for inconsistencies, I'm afraid inconsistencies are a failure to read the books correctly. Every time somebody has come to me with an inconsistency, I have been able to point out in a return letter where their mistake was.
Of course, most of the time this was probably true. But he stopped saying stuff like that once the list of actual inconsistencies started to accumulate online.

Terez
01-17-2012, 02:04 PM
Also, I should probably mention that, for the most part, people described RJ as being rather friendly, but every now and then, he would get in a mood (especially if he was in a real time chat where people were asking stupid questions and the moderators weren't filtering repeat questions). And he was never so clumsy as to give Terry-Goodkind-like insults, but he could be very subtle. In fact, he could be very blatant, but he did it in a way that was more like teasing than insulting most of the time. Like the German Shepard quote.

Isabel
01-17-2012, 10:47 PM
As someone who has met RJ and has followed all the interviews when they happened, I can say that there weren't that many critical questions asked in interviews and chats.
At least when I asked questions about errors and mistakes RJ was always really nice.
RJ was a very nice and charismatic man to meet.

I know of one report of someone on westeros who apparantly insulted RJ in Charleston and I remember RJ didn't respond well to it.
(this was one of the only times i heard about)