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Fin
02-01-2012, 10:08 PM
I'm not sure how many folks on here would be into this but i picked this up yesterday. I have been playing the FF series since probably 1992. I still own my copy of the first one on NES. I didn't care too much for 13 by itself but so far this is seeming much better.

fdsaf3
02-01-2012, 10:34 PM
I played FF 13 for about 25 hours in 4 days (what? I was in between semesters and had little else to do), and didn't mind it. I wasn't blown away by the story, but I feel like I've slowly been losing interest in the Final Fantasy series since 10. I'm just not the target audience for the art, story, and overall direction of the series anymore.

That said, I have enjoyed all the Final Fantasy games I've played. I'd be curious to hear more about 13-2 once people have impressions about it.

DahLliA
02-02-2012, 05:11 PM
got it a few days ago.

my impressions so far is that the story is a bit weird, but they've fixed most of the issues that 13 had.

it's nowhere near as linear or "dead". dead being that there is hardly a single npc anywhere.

I like the monster system, though it does limit your paradigm-choices a bit.

and Mog is awesome, kupo !

Fin
02-02-2012, 10:42 PM
yea i just figured out how to get the dlc genji bow that i received via pre ordering it. that is a beast. i like how the paradigms are under one menu now. i still love the mog game from the casino in 7.

eht slat meit
02-02-2012, 11:35 PM
Used to enjoy the games, but started to lose interest when FF started turning MMoRPGish and when they brought the PS3 out. No time for that stuff.

DahLliA
02-03-2012, 12:29 AM
Used to enjoy the games, but started to lose interest when FF started turning MMoRPGish and when they brought the PS3 out. No time for that stuff.

just wait for FF13 Versus(not connected with FF13 and 13-2).

seems like they're going a bit more back to basic there.

at least you'll get a world map and airships you can actually fly yourself :D

Oatman
02-04-2012, 08:20 AM
FF 13 was the first FF I felt absolutely no desire to finish. The game essentially played itself, the only emotion I felt towards any of the characters was an urge to slap them upside the head, and when I got to a part of the game where the characters explained that I was in an area designed to make them stronger (i.e. grind levels) I simply stopped playing. Due to my experience with X-2 I don't have high hopes for direct sequels.

Verin Mathwin
02-04-2012, 09:59 AM
I just couldn't finish FF 13. I had no desire to play through it. It was extremely linear and uninteresting. That said I don't know how I would feel about getting 13-2. As was mentioned 13 - Versus looks amazing and I can't wait for it... if it ever comes out. It was first unveiled in 2006.

Zombie Sammael
02-04-2012, 10:30 AM
I am one of the few people who did enjoy XIII. I think the linearity is a legitimate complaint from a pure gameplay point of view, but on the other hand, has anybody played Bioshock? If you have, you'll know that that game, as part of its story, raised some interesting questions about linearity midway through. Unfortunately, it then went on to function in exactly the same way for the second half of the game, indicating that it had no answers for these questions.

FF-XIII did the same thing; in the world of Cocoon, the characters had no choices, their lives essentially controlled and directed by the Fal'cie. It was only when they arrived in Gran Pulse that the game opened up, giving the player an area they could explore at their leisure, that FF-XIII surpassed Bioshock by demonstrating that it actually did have an answer to the problem of linearity; an open world. Of course, the characters eventually did have to face their destiny and return to the linearity of Cocoon... so that they could, post-game, return and enjoy the freedom of Pulse once again.

So while it's linearity put many people off, the argument that it's actually an essential part of the game is, as far as I'm aware, borne out by the sequel, which opens things up and makes things much less linear... once again as an integral part of the plot. I think XIII has been underestimated from this point of view because so many people didn't get the point it was making, or didn't enjoy it even if they did. I have only just picked up XIII-2, but my understanding is that it essentially sets out to "fix" every single complaint people had about its predecessor. That's certainly the impression I got from the gameplay of the demo, which kept the same system from XIII-2 but with the freedom to change party leader at any time, among other corrections.

I am of the opinion that XIII was a far better, and worthier, instalment of the series than XII, though the series reached its apex at X.

(tl;dr FF-XIII is like Bioshock but better)

Sukoto
02-04-2012, 06:42 PM
I would probably get 13-2, but my PS3 recently died, and my wife is vehemently opposed to me getting a new one. It's sad, cuz it was an original backward compatible PS3. Looks like I'll be getting rid of my PS games, too.

Oatman
02-04-2012, 10:39 PM
I think the linearity is a legitimate complaint from a pure gameplay point of view, but on the other hand, has anybody played Bioshock? If you have, you'll know that that game, as part of its story, raised some interesting questions about linearity midway through.

Linearity as part of the story is something I have no issues with, in fact all Final Fantasy's have had a more or less linear story. you have to complete a particular task before the next one is open to you, and you progressively open up more of the world. The linearity of the gameplay however, I have major issues with. I made it to the last disk of the game before I stopped playing, and each area I went through was essentially a one way path to the another fight and the next screen. This can work in certain area's, but when it is every area it just gets really old.
The problem is compounded by the game being a Final Fantasy. The series has always had a sense of being in a world you are free to explore, at least within the bounds of the progression you have made through the game. There has always been that alternate path to a treasure, or a particularly hard enemy, or an NPC. Just something you could faff about with before progressing further in the game. I don't recall any of this being present in XIII. If I recall correctly, the game even prevents you from faffing about to gain levels by restricting how far you can progress your characters within certain area's.
I guess the game just felt more like an interactive movie than a game. Move your character here, not there. Perform the attacks we tell you will work best in this situation. Watch the pretty animations and forget that this is supposed to be an interactive experience. (As far as the last point goes, the game is visually amazing, props to Square Enix on that one.)

Zombie Sammael
02-05-2012, 05:58 AM
Linearity as part of the story is something I have no issues with, in fact all Final Fantasy's have had a more or less linear story. you have to complete a particular task before the next one is open to you, and you progressively open up more of the world. The linearity of the gameplay however, I have major issues with. I made it to the last disk of the game before I stopped playing, and each area I went through was essentially a one way path to the another fight and the next screen. This can work in certain area's, but when it is every area it just gets really old.
The problem is compounded by the game being a Final Fantasy. The series has always had a sense of being in a world you are free to explore, at least within the bounds of the progression you have made through the game. There has always been that alternate path to a treasure, or a particularly hard enemy, or an NPC. Just something you could faff about with before progressing further in the game. I don't recall any of this being present in XIII. If I recall correctly, the game even prevents you from faffing about to gain levels by restricting how far you can progress your characters within certain area's.
I guess the game just felt more like an interactive movie than a game. Move your character here, not there. Perform the attacks we tell you will work best in this situation. Watch the pretty animations and forget that this is supposed to be an interactive experience. (As far as the last point goes, the game is visually amazing, props to Square Enix on that one.)

All of which goes to how restricted the lives of (1) the people of Cocoon and (2) the main characters, as L'Cie with an inescapable focus are. You may not like that restriction, but it's not there because Square Enix forgot how to make games as some people seem to think. It's there because the game has a specific theme of freedom versus destiny.

To look at it in another way, Cloud and Co were never just going to let Sephiroth summon Meteor and become one with the Planet in FFVII, but nevertheless, there was nothing making them stop it; they were free to go off and spend weeks breeding chocobo any time they liked (and did, in most people's games). Lightning et al are not offered that same freedom. They have to fulfil their focus, or become monsters. Their lives are further restricted by the control the Fal'cie have over Cocoon. Compare this to the Midgar section of FFVII, which is also essentially linear with few distractions and little prospect for exploration; that too is controlled by a totalitarian power in the form of Shinra. Like how FFXIII places you on Pulse and gives you freedom for one section of the game where the main party are away from the controlling Fal'cie, it's only when you escape from the tightly controlled Midgar that you have that freedom.

Or look at FFX; much like FFXIII, Spira is essentially a giant road, with Besaid at one end and Zanarkand at the other, with little else to do. But "Spira is a land of suffering and sorrow, caught in a spiral of death"; the player characters are caught in that same spiral. When Yuna starts to break that cycle by ending the false tradition of the final Aeon, you coincidentally gain access to the airship. The spiral is broken, so now you have freedom; you're not on the road from home town to death anymore. FFXIII gives you a taste of similar freedom when you first visit Cocoon, but true freedom only comes after you've finished the game and destroyed the Fal'cie, after which you can go back to Cocoon and explore at your leisure.

How wise is all of that as a gameplay choice? It's debatable, but it worked in the series two most popular entries, so why not try it again? Unfortunately, that ignored the changes going on in the wider gaming industry, which had taken the influence of the earlier FF games to heart and thrown off restriction entirely, making the player totally free as a starting point. Note that this is a phenomenon not really realised by Japanese developers, hence the feeling that Japan has fallen from grace among many in the Western gaming community. People wanted an FF with the same level of openness as Skyrim, but it would have been impossible to tell the story they wanted to tell with that level of openness. There's little about destiny versus freedom in Skyrim; in fact, freedom and exploration are the name of the game. It explores totally different themes.

FFXIII was let down by its linearity, but unfortunately, it also would not have worked without it.

Oatman
02-05-2012, 04:54 PM
All of which goes to how restricted the lives of (1) the people of Cocoon and (2) the main characters, as L'Cie with an inescapable focus are. You may not like that restriction, but it's not there because Square Enix forgot how to make games as some people seem to think. It's there because the game has a specific theme of freedom versus destiny.

To look at it in another way, Cloud and Co were never just going to let Sephiroth summon Meteor and become one with the Planet in FFVII, but nevertheless, there was nothing making them stop it; they were free to go off and spend weeks breeding chocobo any time they liked (and did, in most people's games). Lightning et al are not offered that same freedom. They have to fulfil their focus, or become monsters. Their lives are further restricted by the control the Fal'cie have over Cocoon. Compare this to the Midgar section of FFVII, which is also essentially linear with few distractions and little prospect for exploration; that too is controlled by a totalitarian power in the form of Shinra. Like how FFXIII places you on Pulse and gives you freedom for one section of the game where the main party are away from the controlling Fal'cie, it's only when you escape from the tightly controlled Midgar that you have that freedom.

Or look at FFX; much like FFXIII, Spira is essentially a giant road, with Besaid at one end and Zanarkand at the other, with little else to do. But "Spira is a land of suffering and sorrow, caught in a spiral of death"; the player characters are caught in that same spiral. When Yuna starts to break that cycle by ending the false tradition of the final Aeon, you coincidentally gain access to the airship. The spiral is broken, so now you have freedom; you're not on the road from home town to death anymore. FFXIII gives you a taste of similar freedom when you first visit Cocoon, but true freedom only comes after you've finished the game and destroyed the Fal'cie, after which you can go back to Cocoon and explore at your leisure.

How wise is all of that as a gameplay choice? It's debatable, but it worked in the series two most popular entries, so why not try it again? Unfortunately, that ignored the changes going on in the wider gaming industry, which had taken the influence of the earlier FF games to heart and thrown off restriction entirely, making the player totally free as a starting point. Note that this is a phenomenon not really realised by Japanese developers, hence the feeling that Japan has fallen from grace among many in the Western gaming community. People wanted an FF with the same level of openness as Skyrim, but it would have been impossible to tell the story they wanted to tell with that level of openness. There's little about destiny versus freedom in Skyrim; in fact, freedom and exploration are the name of the game. It explores totally different themes.

FFXIII was let down by its linearity, but unfortunately, it also would not have worked without it.

Although I enjoy playing an open world game like Skyrim I much prefer the game with a deep story. My issue with FF XIII is that it felt like I was watching the game rather than playing it.
It is possible for games to give linearity, and provide restrictions, while maintaining a feeling of an open world. You mentioned FF VII and X as examples. While you are on a set path for portions of the game you manage to encounter so much variety in the environment, in the NPC's, and in different options available to you that it isn't as obvious. Additionally, The VII midgar section lasted half way through the first disc at most, so lets say 1/6 of the game. I was on the 3rd disc of XIII and hadn't made it to Pulse yet, so more than 2/3 of the game was Cacoon.
Overall I probably could have looked passed my dissapointment in the gameplay if the characters had been likeable and the story had been compelling. Maybe it gets better after where I quit, but it really shouldn't take that long into the game to secure my interest.