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Ivhon
08-20-2008, 09:37 AM
Ok, so I was listening to the TV and they awarded some medals and I got to thinking about National Anthems.

Objectively speaking (taking national pride and politics out of it to the extent possible - just the music) what are your favorite national anthems?

I really like the Russian one - actually get more goosebumps to that one than my own (which I like, objectively speaking).

O, Canadia is nice too.

Sarevok
08-20-2008, 10:29 AM
Hmm, yup, I like the Russian one too (although I don't understand the words. :)
I believe I like the USA anthem too, although I can't remember it atm...
And then there's the Dutch national anthem, for wich I looked up a few links:
Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Het_Wilhelmus)
Listen to it on Youtube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uIg9VaMBi9o)

Davian93
08-20-2008, 10:45 AM
The old Soviet one was always cool...ours is the best of course and Canadia has a neat one.

I like the French one though if you ever actually read the words it is rather disturbing.

Ishara
08-20-2008, 11:18 AM
Objectively speaking, I love Canada's national anthem. The words mean something - not just a layering on of meaningless words, you know? And the music? Well, it swells up in my chest. It makes me cry, not gonna lie.

Maybe post the words of the Russian anthem?

John Snow
08-20-2008, 12:06 PM
you won't have much chance to hear the Korean national anthem, but it's a good tune with some thoughts about the natural beauty of Korea and feelings of home and clan that Koreans have. The Malaysian national anthem, on the other hand, while a catchy tune, is jingoistic and in places downright racist (anti-Chinese).

Yuri33
08-20-2008, 12:11 PM
I find it funny that USA's anthem doesn't actually mention "United," "States," or "America" anywhere. The only requirement is that there are stars and strips on the flag, and I think there are more than a few countries that fit that bill. It's like Frances Scott Key wasn't sure what the name of the country was.

Heck, before the "Star-Spangled Banner" became the national anthem in 1931, it was another song called "Hail, Columbia."

Plus, the music was actually an old drinking song...

Gilshalos Sedai
08-20-2008, 12:14 PM
Thank you Wiki!

USSR Version:

Unbreakable union of freeborn republics
Great Russia has welded forever to stand!
Created in struggle by will of the people
United and mighty, our Soviet land!


CHORUS:

Sing to the Motherland, home of the free,

Bulwark of people, in brotherhood strong!

Oh! Party of Lenin! The strength of the people.

To Communism's triumph lead us on!

2.
Through tempests the sunrays of freedom have cheered us
Along the new path where great Lenin did lead!
To a righteous cause he raised up the people
Inspired them to labor and valorous deed!


CHORUS
3.
In the victory of Communism's deathless ideal,
We see the future of our dear land
And to her fluttering scarlet banner,
selflessly true, we always shall stand!


CHORUS


Russian Federation Version (to the same music)

Russia — our sacred stronghold,
Russia — our beloved country.
A mighty will, a great glory —
Your heritage for all time!



Chorus:
Be glorious, our free Fatherland,
Ancient union of brotherly nations,
Ancestor-given wisdom of the people!
Be glorious, country! We take pride in you!



From the southern seas to the polar region
Spread our forests and our fields.
You are the only one in the world! You are the only one of a kind —
Native land protected by God!



Chorus



A broad expanse for dreams and for lives
Is opened to us by the coming years.
Our devotion to our Motherland gives us strength.
So it was, so it is, and so it will always be!



Chorus


~*~
Plus, the music was actually an old drinking song...

Hey, I find it oddly appropriate that our national anthem was a British drinking song!

Ishara
08-20-2008, 01:05 PM
Oooh I like the Russian Federation one...very stirring.

DeiwosTheSkyGod
08-20-2008, 03:44 PM
I love the Italian one.

Birgitte
08-20-2008, 03:51 PM
I'm not really familiar with any except the U.S.'s. I like it, though, as patriotic songs go, I like "My country tis of thee." (whatever it's actually called.. I haven't heard it since elementary school.)

Oh, and to speak for my Aes Sedai (since he's not around to speak for himself), the French national anthem is very nice... If by nice, you mean all about blood and gorey battles.

Cary Sedai
08-20-2008, 04:12 PM
Oh, and to speak for my Aes Sedai (since he's not around to speak for himself), the French national anthem is very nice... If by nice, you mean all about blood and gorey battles.

La Marseillaise

Allons enfants de la Patrie,
Le jour de gloire est arrivé !
Contre nous de la tyrannie,
L'étendard sanglant est levé. (bis)
Entendez-vous dans les campagnes
Mugir ces féroces soldats ?
Ils viennent jusque dans nos bras
Égorger nos fils, nos compagnes !

Aux armes, citoyens !
Formez vos bataillons !
Marchons, marchons !
Qu'un sang impur
Abreuve nos sillons !
Aux armes, citoyens !
Formons nos bataillons !
Marchons, marchons !
Qu'un sang impur
Abreuve nos sillons !

Que veut cette horde d'esclaves,
De traîtres, de rois conjurés ?
Pour qui ces ignobles entraves
Ces fers dès longtemps préparés ? (bis)
Français, pour nous, ah ! quel outrage,
Quels transports il doit exciter !
C'est nous qu'on ose méditer
De rendre à l'antique esclavage !

Aux armes, citoyens...

Quoi ! des cohortes étrangères
Feraient la loi dans nos foyers !
Quoi ! ces phalanges mercenaires
Terrasseraient nos fiers guerriers ! (bis)
Grand Dieu ! par des mains enchaînées
Nos fronts sous le joug se ploieraient
De vils despotes deviendraient
Les maîtres de nos destinées !

Aux armes, citoyens...

Tremblez, tyrans et vous perfides
L'opprobre de tous les partis
Tremblez ! vos projets parricides
Vont enfin recevoir leurs prix ! (bis)
Tout est soldat pour vous combattre
S'ils tombent, nos jeunes héros,
La terre en produit de nouveaux,
Contre vous tout prêts à se battre !

Aux armes, citoyens...

Français, en guerriers magnanimes,
Portez ou retenez vos coups !
Épargnez ces tristes victimes
À regret s'armant contre nous (bis)
Mais ces despotes sanguinaires
Mais ces complices de Bouillé
Tous ces tigres qui, sans pitié,
Déchirent le sein de leur mère !

Aux armes, citoyens...

Amour sacré de la Patrie,
Conduis, soutiens nos bras vengeurs
Liberté, Liberté chérie,
Combats avec tes défenseurs ! (bis)
Sous nos drapeaux que la victoire
Accoure à tes mâles accents,
Que nos ennemis expirants
Voient ton triomphe et notre gloire !

Aux armes, citoyens...

(Couplet des enfants)
Nous entrerons dans la carrière [3]

Quand nos aînés n'y seront plus
Nous y trouverons leur poussière
Et la trace de leurs vertus (bis)
Bien moins jaloux de leur survivre
Que de partager leur cercueil,
Nous aurons le sublime orgueil
De les venger ou de les suivre !

Aux armes, citoyens...


English translation:

Arise, children of the Fatherland,
The day of glory has arrived!

Against us the tyranny
The bloodied banner is raised. (repeat)
Do you hear in the countryside
The roar of those ferocious soldiers?
They come right here among us
To slaughter our sons and wives!

To arms, citizens!

Form your battalions!

Let's march, let's march!
May a tainted blood
Soak our furrows!
To arms, citizens!

Let us form our battalions!

Let us march, let us march!
May a tainted blood
Soak our furrows!

What does this horde of slaves,
Of traitors and conspirating kings want?
For whom these vile chains
These long-prepared irons? (repeat)
Frenchmen, for us, ah! What an insult,
What fury it must arouse!
It is us they dare plan
To return to the old slavery!

To arms, citizens...

What! These foreign cohorts!

Would rule our homes!
What! These mercenary phalanxes

Would cut down our proud warriors! (repeat)
Good Lord! By chained hands
Our fronts would yield under the yoke
The vile despots would become
The masters of our destinies!

To arms, citizens...

Tremble, tyrants and traitors
The shame of all good men
Tremble! Your parricidal schemes

Will receive their just reward! (repeat)
Against you, we are all soldiers
If our young heroes fall,
The earth will bear new ones,
Ready to join the fight against you!

To arms, citizens...

Frenchmen, as magnanimous warriors,
Bear or hold back your blows!
Spare these sad victims
Armed against us against their will (repeat)
But not these blood-thirsty despots
These accomplices of Bouillé

All these tigers who mercilessly
Ripped out their mother's breast!

To arms, citizens...

Sacred patriotic love,
Lead and support our avenging arms
Liberty, cherished liberty,
Fight back with your defenders! (repeat)
Under our flags, let victory
Hurry to your manly tone,
So that our enemies, in their last breath,
See your triumph and our glory!

To arms, citizens...

(Children's Verse)
We shall enter the (military) career
When our elders are no longer there
There we shall find their dust
And the mark of their virtues (repeat)
Much less keen to survive them
As to share their coffins,
We shall have the sublime pride
Of avenging or following them!

To arms, citizens...


No, kidding, very bloody... :eek:

ShadowbaneX
08-20-2008, 04:22 PM
La Marseillaise

No, kidding, very bloody... :eek:

See: the French History. For recent, specific examples see: the French Revolution, Napolean, the Franco-Prussian War, World Wars I & II, etc.

tanaww
08-20-2008, 04:46 PM
See: the French History. For recent, specific examples see: the French Revolution, Napolean, the Franco-Prussian War, World Wars I & II, etc.

I tried, SBX, but this (http://www.albinoblacksheep.com/text/victories.html) is what I got.


(I kid because I love SBX, you know that)

Terez
08-20-2008, 05:06 PM
My favorite by far is Israel's (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S22d4f-Trys&feature=related). But Kenya's (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MVXkNUZ1Hes&feature=related) is pretty cool. Not the usual, anyway. Mauritania's (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0MYmPer0rdo&feature=related) is neat too. :D

Ishara
08-20-2008, 06:54 PM
I like the French one - at least they're true to their political origins.

tanaww
08-20-2008, 08:33 PM
I like the French one - at least they're true to their political origins.

True. And the tune is lovely.

Oh Canadia, eh? Funny. I thought it was "What Would Brian Boitano Do?"

ShadowbaneX
08-20-2008, 10:19 PM
I think it's those defeats that are at least in part responsible for those lyrics. I mean the opening part of those lyrics are:

Do you hear in the countryside
The roar of those ferocious soldiers?
They come right here among us
To slaughter our sons and wives!

I mean, I know the French are kinda nuts, but I don't think that their own soldiers would go around slaughtering their own sons and wives, so I'm gonna guess that they're foreign. Having foreign soldiers on their land so often tends to make people paranoid and bulk up on their weapon stockpiles and the like...(ie see: Russia)

Davian93
08-21-2008, 07:06 AM
With the French you almost have to wonder if the song is more responsible for their 484 different forms of government in the past 200 years or that instability caused the song to be adopted. Considering it was written and adopted during the original revolution I tend to think its like a blank check for them any time they get sick of their current constitution.

Ishara
08-21-2008, 07:28 AM
Oh, I don't know about that. At least the French population has had the guts to stand up and change what wasn't working for them...

Gilshalos Sedai
08-21-2008, 07:45 AM
Um.. one revolution in the past 5 hundred years does not a "brave society" make.

After all, the Russians did the same thing, just more recently.

Realnow
08-21-2008, 08:32 AM
Canada's anthem is embarrassing. I mean it has the most boring and generic lyrics, and really doesn't inspire much for most people. Its got a bland sound and you could really replace "O Canada" with "O anything". Repetitive and so much less patriotic than most countries. Its like they didn't even try when writiing this song, unless it was a grade school class or something.

Ishara
08-21-2008, 08:46 AM
Geez Realnow, tell us how you really feel. :rolleyes: By the way, emarassing? For who? I think patriotism is a pretty relative thing, you know, means different things to different people. Canada is quietly patriotic, as is our anthem. I happen to love it, and what it stands for.

Oh, and Gil:

Um.. one revolution in the past 5 hundred years does not a "brave society" make. Tell me you're talking about the United States, because France has had well more than one revolution in the past three hundred years. And yes, I do happen to think that it's commendable to overthrow ones government when it isn't doing it's job - instead of just whining about it.

Also, Russia? Call Russia a lot of things, but cowardly really shouldn't be one of them. You like working less then 18 hours a day? You can pretty much thank the Blosheviks for starting that trend...among other things. ;)

Gilshalos Sedai
08-21-2008, 09:05 AM
Ishara... dahling... calm down. France had ONE revolution. Napoleon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Napoleon) didn't come to power through a revolution, at least not according to all the French history I had to take with my minor in French (A coup d'etat is NOT a revolution, no matter what the victors would have us believe). And he didn't get ousted with one, either. And, in case you've forgotten, I'm usually the LAST one on these boards to call the French a cowardly society, considering I AM OF FRENCH DESCENT, remember? I speak the language fairly fluently and though I am about as happy with the current direction the French government is taking as I am with my own government, I don't love the culture and the poeple any less. I don't consider them an overly brave society, however, which is fine, since I believe bravery, for the most part, is overrated in most cases.

I also studied Russian through high school and college, and I really don't credit the Bolsheviks with the unionization of the United States, considering the unionization movement began long before the Proletariat overthrew their unjust masters giving birth to the USSR. It just picked up steam after 1917.


I do happen to think that it's commendable to overthrow ones government when it isn't doing it's job - instead of just whining about it.

With a few notable exceptions (eg. Ted Kennedy), we tend to overthrow at least 1/3 of our government every other year, and our head of government leaves after 8 years.

Davian93
08-21-2008, 09:31 AM
The key difference with France is that they rewrite their entire constitution every time they change. And they bring back a monarchy ever so often to spice things up.

Gilshalos Sedai
08-21-2008, 09:39 AM
Um, no. Napoleon instituted several changes they still use in their government to this day. That's not reinventing one's government. They've had Five Republics, yes, but it's splitting hairs to call anything other than the first revolution anything else. After all, it wasn't a revolution that led to the creation of the Fifth Republic, was it? Which is what I originally said.

France changes governments frequently, yes. But other than the first Revolution (And no, I'm not counting Vichy France), they tend to not throw the baby out with the bathwater and keep some things that did work from the previous incarnation.

That is NOT a revolution, nor a "brave society."

And to clarify this:

With a few notable exceptions (eg. Ted Kennedy), we tend to overthrow at least 1/3 of our government every other year, and our head of government leaves after 8 years.

We also don't do it violently, either.

Mort
08-21-2008, 09:51 AM
I am mostly not a big fan of national anthems,usually don't like the music genre they are played in...

I do like the USA's (is there any music or just song in it btw?), Britains is kinda cool.

And of course, Sweden's (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XlHaschCX2s)

:D

There are lyrics to it too, two verses are:

Thou ancient, thou freeborn, thou mountainous North,
In beauty and peace our hearts beguiling,
I greet thee, thou loveliest land on the earth,
/:Thy sun, thy skies, thy verdant meadows smiling.:/

Thy throne rests on mem'ries from great days of yore,
When worldwide renown was valour's guerdon.
I know to thy name thou art true as before.
/:Oh, I would live and I would die in Sweden:/

Even though the translation says Sweden in it,
the original doesn't actually mention Sweden at all.
Only The North/Nordic.

When I were searching for an english translation I
found out that Poland's anthem mentions Sweden though :)

Davian93
08-21-2008, 10:12 AM
I disagree Gil...you're ignoring the 3 monarchies thrown in there and the reformations made after WWII when they lost all their overseas territories. 1830 and 1848 and the fall of Napoleon III should also be considered revolutions albeit gentler ones than the original...

I would say that the aftershocks should still count as earthquakes. <-----Oooh...Dav used a Metaphor!:eek:

Gilshalos Sedai
08-21-2008, 10:49 AM
Nope, not ignoring them. Perhaps it's the fault of my French teachers, but when I learned the history of France, the Republics were more emphasized as eras, not divisions of governments and revolutions with the notable exception being 1789.

Cute, though misplaced, metaphor. ;)

ShadowbaneX
08-21-2008, 01:01 PM
Let's be honest though, has there been any country out there that has had a revolution like the French one? I mean they threw out EVERYTHING, during their's. Just about anything to do with the old system was gone and something new put in their place. Religion, system of measurement (yay metric system!), names, social experimentation, etc.

Then you've got the Terror (yes, which is seperate from the Revolution) and once that ran its course, Napoleon showed up.

Anyway, judging a Revolution by those criteria, the American Revolution wasn't a revolution at all, (and this is what I was taught Gil) but independence and the start of a new system. If anything it's an evolution, not a revolution (hummm, I wonder what those Intelligent Design types would think of that idea).

The Communist Revolutions of Russia and China come close as those involved alot of broad sweeping changes...although less so in China's case as it was mainly the system that changed, the peasants were, and, in many cases, still are peasants. The Nazis coming to power can be seen as a Fascist Revolution, although we all know how that ended.

One revolution does not a brave society make...at all! Especially when that revolution collapses under itself within a century (...most aren't even lucky to make it more then a decade!).

The French did, and probably still do, have guts. Regardless of the number revolutions. Let's be honest, one of the reasons the French Revolution destabilized was their own fervor for changed. They changed too much, too soon.

Another was that the other Monarchs of Europe saw what was going on, and then moved in to ensure that their own necks remained intact...they didn't want this idea of the monarchy being abolished and the commoners having a vote in decision making to spread around. So that brought the French Monarchy back and then they screwed it up and then Napoleon came back out of exile and so on and so forth.

That's what instigated the whole change of systems back and forth. Some people believe that way 'x' is the right way to go, some others believe it's way 'y', still others go for 'z' and every so often they convice the undecided to go along with them and there's a change in the system.

If you're Canadian, you're probably familiar with this concept, Conservatives vs. Liberals vs. NDP and every few years after watching the current party screw things up we pick another (well, not so much the NDP, unless you're looking at the provincial politics). If you're American, well, it's mostly all right-wing down there anyway, so even when your 'left-wing' types get into power, the rest of us still look at them as right-wing and your system keeps on going.

Ishara
08-21-2008, 01:02 PM
Ouch. My (I can't call it sarcasm, but you know what I mean) metre must have been off Gil - that probably looked a lot snippier than it sounded to me.

I tend to agre with Dav on the point that the reformations counted as Revolution, which is whay I made the point that I did, but I can see why you would disagree. I was trying to say that right or worng, successful or not - at least there was an effort to affect change, you know?

The dig about whining wasn't so much about the US, but about the general apathy towards politics these days. If similiar acts and politicians existed one or two hundred years ago, they would have been lynched in the streets. Now - across the world - people just shrug. It's sad. Stable, but still sad.

As for the Bolsheviks, I have to beg to differ. It's the left in me talking, but some of the key general values we have about the labour movement stem from the Bolsheviks - who while, admittedly, were not the first to pioneer the movement, did a LOT to bring it to the international stage and scare the pants off of enough companies and governments to allow them to take a long and sober second look at the fact that maybe unions weren't so bad. Many years later, again admittedly, but everythings gotta start somewhere.

ShadowbaneX
08-21-2008, 01:06 PM
actually, we have alot to thank Communism for. When the Reds were gaining power the Capitalists saw the thread and started to give perks to their workers in order to prevent them from going over. Without that threat, there'd be no unions, no medical/dental coverage, no vacation time, no 9-5, etc.

Gilshalos Sedai
08-21-2008, 01:09 PM
Anyway, judging a Revolution by those criteria, the American Revolution wasn't a revolution at all, (and this is what I was taught Gil) but independence and the start of a new system. If anything it's an evolution, not a revolution (hummm, I wonder what those Intelligent Design types would think of that idea).

You're right, though the American Revolution was pretty much called that simply because there wasn't a better name for what we did.



actually, we have alot to thank Communism for. When the Reds were gaining power the Capitalists saw the thread and started to give perks to their workers in order to prevent them from going over. Without that threat, there'd be no unions, no medical/dental coverage, no vacation time, no 9-5, etc.

I did say it kicked it up a notch in 1917, but the movements had already started. The threat of rebellion by the workers are what goosed the corporations to play ball, I know that. I'm just not giving the USSR all the credit. ;)

ShadowbaneX
08-21-2008, 01:20 PM
they were the ones that took Communism and ran with it. The Russians were always lagging behind in the previous couple of centuries and when they saw this they said: "this is the future and we will be where it flourishes!" finally thinking that they could get ahead of the curve. Without them providing the basis of power for the ComItern, it's possible that Communism never would have taken off and never really posed the threat that it did to the big companies and as such, with no Russia, no Communism, no worker perks.