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Terez
09-05-2008, 08:02 AM
I have a German quiz in 3 hours. I have to learn to count to 20. Lessee...

eins
zwei
drei
fier?
fun...wait, how do you spell this one?

DeiwosTheSkyGod
09-05-2008, 08:10 AM
Me too!

funf with the umlaut over the u, right?

Terez
09-05-2008, 08:11 AM
Is it? Uh....I know that zwölf has one. :D

tanaww
09-05-2008, 08:14 AM
I'm sure Sarevok will help/ correct on this one.
ein
zwei
drei
fier
funf (with the umlaut)
sechs
sieben
oct
neun
zehn
elf
zwolf
dreizehn
fierzehn
funfzehn
sexsehn
siebzehn
octzehn
neunzehn
zwanzig


Or maybe its...
adin
dva
tree
chitiri
pyat...

Or is it:
hana
do
set
net
daset
yaset
aghup
eto
ahup
yo...

Or maybe:
uno, dos, tres... :) I slay me.

Terez
09-05-2008, 08:20 AM
I'm sure Sarevok will help/ correct on this one.
ein
zwei
drei
fier
funf (with the umlaut)
sechs
sieben
oct
neun
zehn
elf
zwolf
dreizehn
fierzehn
funfzehn
sexsehn
siebzehn
octzehn
neunzehn
zwanzig
K, I can correct at least some of these from memory...it's "ach", not "oct", and it's "sechzehn", not sexzehn. :p And of course achzehn...I think...dammit I have to get my book out!

Don't you guys know how to make umlauts? üöä!

tanaww
09-05-2008, 08:21 AM
K, I can correct at least some of these from memory...it's "ach", not "oct", and it's "sechzehn", not sexzehn. :p And of course achzehn...I think...dammit I have to get my book out!

Don't you guys know how to make umlauts? üöä!

Glad I could help you review :) Mission accomplished.

Davian93
09-05-2008, 08:23 AM
and it's "sechzehn", not sexzehn

No...its Szechuan....mmm, Szechuan chicken.

DeiwosTheSkyGod
09-05-2008, 08:26 AM
I think it's acht, not ach.

Terez
09-05-2008, 08:28 AM
You are correct. So I got my book out. I have to start from zero, actually:

null
eins
zwei
drei
vier
fünf
sechs
sieben
acht
neun
zehn
elf
zwölf
dreizehn
vierzehn
fünfzehn
sechzehn
siebzehn
achtzehn
neunzehn
zwanzig

:D

Now I have to memorize all that...

Brita
09-05-2008, 08:31 AM
Good luck!

I'm no help- it's all Greek to me. Haha- I slay me. (Hey tanaww, did you ever read the comic Groo?)

GonzoTheGreat
09-05-2008, 08:32 AM
It is indeed acht (and achtzehn), and zwölf also has an umlaut.

I've never understood why umlaut doesn't have an umlaut in it.

Terez
09-05-2008, 08:33 AM
Yeah, doesn't "ach" mean something like "oh no!"? :D

irerancincpkc
09-05-2008, 08:34 AM
Good luck. :D

My last German class was six years ago, and all I remember is Welkemin, or something like that...

GonzoTheGreat
09-05-2008, 08:34 AM
Ach nein, "ach" means "oh".

PS That's not grammatically correct German, in case you're wondering.

Terez
09-05-2008, 08:38 AM
All I know is that "ach" is often used as an exclamation in some of the German songs I listen to. Ach! I imagine it's like saying "Agh!" Imagine that. :D

GonzoTheGreat
09-05-2008, 08:43 AM
Oh, they do use it in that way. Translating it as "oh no" may be correct. But doing it the other way around, from english to german, may not be correct. Of course, you may be lucky, so you can try.

Terez
09-05-2008, 08:45 AM
Well, I'm lazy, so why would I say "ach nein" when I could just say "Ach!"? :D

Terez
09-05-2008, 08:47 AM
Good luck. :D

My last German class was six years ago, and all I remember is Welkemin, or something like that...
Willkommen?

Davian93
09-05-2008, 08:48 AM
Ein Beir Bitte!


All the German you'll ever need to know Spammer. :)

Oh and Donkeyshine means thankyou ;)

Terez
09-05-2008, 08:51 AM
Ein Beir Bitte!
Did you mean Bier? ;)

Gilshalos Sedai
09-05-2008, 08:53 AM
I'll stick with French, Russian and Spanish. German's always sounded like my cat yakking up a hairball to me.

irerancincpkc
09-05-2008, 08:56 AM
Willkommen?
Okay? :D I really have no clue.

GonzoTheGreat
09-05-2008, 08:56 AM
Well, I'm lazy, so why would I say "ach nein" when I could just say "Ach!"? :D
Ach, I weiss nicht. Vielleicht while man "ach" auch in andere Fälle anwenden kan?

And I have no doubt at all that Davian meant Bier. I do not think that he needs to worry too much about pronounciation either, as long as he asks it in the right place, they'll get him what he's paying for.

Davian93
09-05-2008, 08:58 AM
Did you mean Bier? ;)

LOL...yes.

~hangs head~

Cary Sedai
09-05-2008, 09:13 AM
Ich liebe dich!

That's all I remember... and a kids rhyme, that I'm not going to spell right, so no one pick on me! (Yes, I know, that means you'll pick on me) :p

eins, zwei, drei, vier, fünf, sechs, sieben
miene mutta de koch glubben
miene mutta de koch spech
und du bist weg

It's something like my mother cooks cabbage, my mother cooks erm something, and you are gone. I learned it 18 years ago... so no clue how close I really am.

Terez
09-05-2008, 09:14 AM
Ach, I weiss nicht. Vielleicht while man "ach" auch in andere Fälle anwenden kan? What?

And I have no doubt at all that Davian meant Bier. I do not think that he needs to worry too much about pronounciation either, as long as he asks it in the right place, they'll get him what he's paying for. He really need not worry about spelling, or even translation for that matter. Though I would recommend a specification as to what type of Bier he wants, lest they give him a Schwarz. :D

Ich liebe dich!
lol...I know that one! Beethoven wrote a song called "Ich liebe dich". :)

Terez
09-05-2008, 09:31 AM
So, now I have to prepare for today's lesson. I have to know what all this means (dialogue between made-up students at a Uni in Berlin):

Claudia: Gehst du jetzt in die Vorlesung, Stephanie?
Stephanie: Ja, und dann zum Auslandsamt.
Claudia: Meine Vorlesungen beginnen erst morgen.
Stephanie: Und was machst du heute?
Claudia: Nicht viel. Zuerst schreibe ich ein paar Karten und heute Nachmittag kaufe ich meine Bücher.
Stephanie: Na, dann bis später.
Claudia: Tschüss, Stephanie.

So, we have to translate these little things on our own, as an exercise. I'm not about to look up every word in the dictionary, so.....

Claudia: Do you go now into the lecture, Stephanie?
Stephanie: Yes, and then to the international exchange. Claudia: My lectures begin not until tomorrow. Stephanie: And which you make today?
Claudia: Not much. First I write a few maps and this afternoon buy I mean books.
Stephanie: Well, then until later.
Claudia: Tschüss, Stephanie. Not bad, Babel Fish! :D

Crispin's Crispian
09-05-2008, 10:20 AM
LOL...yes.

~hangs head~

Davian, I recommend a good dark bier with your szechuan chicken. Damn...it's 8:18 AM and I'm already hungry for dinner.

Terez
09-05-2008, 10:23 AM
It's Bier, Dawg. Nouns are always capitalized in Deutsch. ;)

Crispin's Crispian
09-05-2008, 10:29 AM
It's Bier, Dawg. Nouns are always capitalized in Deutsch. ;)
I wasn't speaking german, obviously. :rolleyes:

John Snow
09-05-2008, 10:32 AM
Or is it:
hana
do
set
net
daset
yaset
aghup
eto
ahup
yo...


Pangopsumnida, Tana!

Terez
09-05-2008, 10:32 AM
I wasn't speaking german, obviously. :rolleyes:
Then you should have just said beer. :p

Okay, from memory now...

null
eins
zwei
drei
vier
fünf
sechs
sieben
acht
neun
zehn
elf
zwölf
dreizehn
vierzehn
fünfzehn
sechzehn
siebzehn
achtzehn
neunzehn
zwanzig!

:D

Birgitte
09-05-2008, 02:24 PM
I like German. Most of the words are fun to say and how things are worded and even how their words break down are interesting (like the word for sinus infection... It's insanely long and I can't spell it though). Though that's the first time I've seen any online translation actually be halfway decent.

Terez
09-05-2008, 02:25 PM
Yeah, I agree that translation was oddly decent.

I'm pretty sure I aced it...

tanaww
09-05-2008, 02:27 PM
Pangopsumnida, Tana!

I speak only TKD class Korean, Professor. Ask RS and B how many times they counted kicks in Korean (or push-ups)

I also know but won't try to spell the phrases that end the class. It is basically "Thank you for the lesson" and "You're welcome". Phonetically it is Ko-map-chee-nee-da and Con-chom-nay-oh

Frenzy
09-05-2008, 06:38 PM
Though I would recommend a specification as to what type of Bier he wants, lest they give him a Schwarz. :D
"You have the ring, and i see your schwartz is as big as mine. Now, let's see how well you.... handle it."

Sarevok
09-06-2008, 04:31 AM
Not bad, Babel Fish! :D
*considers listing all the errors Babelfish made in there*

Nah... too much work :|

Well, I'm lazy, so why would I say "ach nein" when I could just say "Ach!"?
Some reason you don't say "Oh" instead of "on no"

And yes, eight = acht

Mort
09-06-2008, 04:34 AM
Man my german is rusty :) I knew most of the numbers but not much else. I remembered a lot of words but couldn't come up with what their meaning were :)

Terez
09-06-2008, 09:48 AM
*considers listing all the errors Babelfish made in there*

Nah... too much work :|
lol...I didn't say there weren't errors. :rolleyes: But usually when Babel Fish "translates" something, you can't even make sense out of it whatsoever. In this case, it was rather easy to make sense out of it. I mean, the results WERE in English, my first language. :rolleyes:

Anaiya Sedai
09-06-2008, 11:13 AM
*wonders why she hasn't posted in here yet*

Bryan Blaire
09-06-2008, 11:57 AM
Ichi
Ni
San
Shi
Go
Roku
Shichi
Hachi
Ku
Ju
...
Hyaku
...

Got to actually converse in Japanese with someone on GW a little a few days ago. Was surprised how much I still remembered.

Terez
09-06-2008, 12:17 PM
*wonders why she hasn't posted in here yet*
haha, I don't wonder. :)

Terez
09-06-2008, 12:21 PM
Ichi
Ni
San
Shi
Go
Roku
Shichi
Hachi
Ku
Ju
...
Hyaku
...

Got to actually converse in Japanese with someone on GW a little a few days ago. Was surprised how much I still remembered. Yeah, and the Japanese continuation is fairly simple, too (though I gather it varies a bit by dialect). I remember only tiny bits of Japanese (having only learned small bits in the first place) but I've never forgotten the numbers, or the "alphabet". Did forget how to write hiragana and katakana, though...and the very few kanji symbols I learned...

Anaiya Sedai
09-06-2008, 02:02 PM
haha, I don't wonder. :)

me is lazy. :D

and been on msn way too much for the last few days..

pops taer
09-06-2008, 04:39 PM
Rednekeese??

won
to
tree
foah
fiv
sits
seben
ate
nin
ten
leben
(all the way up to twenny won and then I run out of fingers, toes and :) )

Bryan Blaire
09-07-2008, 11:51 AM
Actually, it's funny, because in Commo training, they taught everyone to say "tree" for three and "niner" for nine. 'Twas odd...

ShadowbaneX
09-07-2008, 12:09 PM
every time I see this thread I want to post the Kool-Aid man.

Gilshalos Sedai
09-07-2008, 04:37 PM
"You have the ring, and i see your schwartz is as big as mine. Now, let's see how well you.... handle it."

There are reasons I love you, sis. You always post what I'm thinking.

jason wolfbrother
09-08-2008, 10:03 AM
üks
kaks
kolm
nelly
vees
cous
seitze
cohaks
ühaks
coumand


yks can correct the spelling but I'm pretty sure that is one to ten in Estonian. I remember that much ;)


German is easy. So many English words sound similar and are spelled similar to the German word. English is actually partially derived from German.


Ich kann spreche Deutsch, aber nicht klar entschuldigung. Das ist eine problem für mich. Ich studiert Deutsch im Üniversitat für zwei jahren.

Gilshalos Sedai
09-08-2008, 10:06 AM
German is easy. So many English words sound similar and are spelled similar to the German word. English is actually partially derived from German.


That's because English follows other languages into dark alleys and mugs them.

Anaiya Sedai
09-08-2008, 10:07 AM
English is easy :D

jason wolfbrother
09-08-2008, 10:15 AM
That's because English follows other languages into dark alleys and mugs them.


Exactly :D :cool: :D :cool: :cool: :p

GonzoTheGreat
09-08-2008, 10:27 AM
That's because English follows other languages into dark alleys and mugs them.
It didn't have to follow german, though, it got those contributions for free. That's what anglo-saxon means: a mixture of german invaders, with some other oddities for additional flavor.

And, of course, the Queens english is helped along by virtue of the Queen (and her family) being basically german anyway.

Davian93
09-08-2008, 10:33 AM
Ich kann spreche Deutsch, aber nicht klar entschuldigung. Das ist eine problem für mich. Ich studiert Deutsch im Üniversitat für zwei jahren.

The funny thing is I had no trouble reading that sentence and I've never studied German in my life.

Anaiya Sedai
09-08-2008, 10:36 AM
the first one doesn't make much sense to me, but the other two are understandable... :p

Davian93
09-08-2008, 10:41 AM
the first one doesn't make much sense to me, but the other two are understandable... :p

I'm part German (well like 1/4)...the old blood sings in my veins. ;)

Gilshalos Sedai
09-08-2008, 10:52 AM
~pictures Dav dressed like the Fat Lady~

Ishara
09-08-2008, 11:16 AM
~pictures Dav in leiderhosen~

Terez
09-08-2008, 01:30 PM
~wonders if Dav realizes that Anaiya speaks fluent German~

Davian93
09-08-2008, 01:54 PM
~wonders if Dav realizes that Anaiya speaks fluent German~

I'm sure its not grammatically correct (I would have no idea but I got the gist of what he was trying to say).

Anaiya Sedai
09-08-2008, 02:36 PM
~wonders if Dav realizes that Anaiya speaks fluent German~

that I do.. that I do.:rolleyes:

Terez
09-08-2008, 02:38 PM
And apparently my teacher doesn't. :(

He told us again today that -ig and -ich are pronounced exactly the same...

DeiwosTheSkyGod
09-08-2008, 02:46 PM
I have two teachers. One of them pronounces them the same, the other you can tell the difference. Maybe it's a regional thing?

Anaiya Sedai
09-08-2008, 02:49 PM
it is a regional thing, but in Hochdeutsch, they are pronounced differently. I think -ich is more of a top half pronounciation (the old GDR area and hamburg, I think)
not that they speak properly where I come from, but we do have a difference.

Gilshalos Sedai
09-08-2008, 03:04 PM
Well, there's a big difference in Russian accents. I was taught by a Belorussian and Ukrainian (and a Pol). They both sounded entirely different.


Let's not get me started on the Pol's Russian accent. :) She was a great teacher, but she pronounced my Ukrainian accented Russian, "funny."

Terez
09-08-2008, 03:06 PM
Well, the point is that my teacher is supposedly teaching us Hochdeutsch (High German), which is like the German version of the Queen's English (supposedly official - it's Luther's version of Deutsch).

Gilshalos Sedai
09-08-2008, 03:09 PM
Ah, kinda like going to learn Oxford English and getting American instead? ;)


I don't think there's such a think in Russian, unless you count Moskva.

Terez
09-08-2008, 03:13 PM
Ah, kinda like going to learn Oxford English and getting American instead?
Sort of, but I gather the differences can be even wider. Like trying to learn the Queen's English and getting Ebonics instead...

Gilshalos Sedai
09-08-2008, 03:14 PM
Or Australian? ;) [/tongue-in-cheek]

John Snow
09-08-2008, 03:18 PM
I lived in Hwasun, just south of Kwangju, in the boonies, and learned to speak just like everybody around me, which it turns out is the Korean equivalent of an Ozarks accent. So of course my wife has been getting me out of speaking that way all these years, but apparently not enough. Last week Lovely Daughter was at the gym & was speaking (Korean) with another exercising young woman. Who looked at her in puzzlement and said, "you have the oddest accent - one moment you sound like a farmer, the next like Seoul nobility." So now she's embarrassed about her accent. And a bit ticked at me (in a humorous way). I told her she could just as easily be ticked at her mother for interfering with her down-country accent.

Sarevok
09-08-2008, 03:59 PM
Like I just told Terez in MSN... I'd always pronounce -ig like -ich in German... And I also speak High-German...

Anaiya Sedai
09-08-2008, 03:59 PM
you're just weird. :P

Sarevok
09-08-2008, 04:02 PM
We need to compare our German on Skype sometime :)
Not now though, ppl are sleeping here.

Anaiya Sedai
09-08-2008, 04:53 PM
i'm watching Keeping mum :D

but yeah, sometime.

Bryan Blaire
09-08-2008, 07:00 PM
Sarevok, you speak high German, or German high? ;)

Sodas
09-08-2008, 07:19 PM
Bryan's got his mind on one thing...

puff puff pass my friend.

jason wolfbrother
09-08-2008, 07:32 PM
here is what I was trying to write ;)

I can speak German although not clearly unfortunately. This is a problem for me. I studied German for 2 years at the University.


Obviously I can't write as well as I thought ;), or I've forgotten a lot since I last used it 3 years ago ;)

Anaiya Sedai
09-08-2008, 07:46 PM
lol.
nope, I wouldn't have recognised that first sentence..

tworiverswoman
09-09-2008, 03:31 PM
That's because English follows other languages into dark alleys and mugs them.I was looking at BASH and found another version of this that cracked me up:

English doesn't borrow from other languages. It follows them down dark allies, knocks them over, and goes through their pockets for loose grammar.

Gilshalos Sedai
09-09-2008, 03:42 PM
LMAO, you're right, much more poetic.

Terez
09-09-2008, 04:03 PM
Frenzy said something similar a couple of years ago (following them down dark alleys and mugging them). I think she said she saw it on a t-shirt or something...

GonzoTheGreat
09-10-2008, 04:43 AM
I've seen something similar, only there it used "rifles":
English doesn't borrow from other languages. It follows them down dark allies, knocks them over, and rifles through their pockets for loose grammar.
This, of course, brought up the question: from which language did english steal "rifle"?

Using dictionary.com, I found that this one word (with a couple of different meanings, either as a noun or a verb) was stolen from at least two different sources.

Rifle/to rifle in the meaning of guns and gun making comes from german, originally. It has to do with grooves.

To rifle in the sense it is used in the sentence above comes from old french, and it means "to plunder".

So english stole a word for stealing things. That is good evidence of having solid principles, I would say.

Gilshalos Sedai
09-10-2008, 07:33 AM
Well, at least we're consistent.

GonzoTheGreat
09-10-2008, 08:08 AM
Come to think of it, the quote I saw probably didn't use "allies" but had "alleys" instead. That would have made more sense, I think. Though "allies" may be appropriate too, of course.

Terez
09-22-2008, 01:06 AM
Fortunately no conjugating yet. Just present tense. :D

ich frage (I ask)
du fragst (you ask - familiar)
er/es/sie fragt (he/it/she asks)
wir fragen (we ask)
ihr fragt (y'all ask)
sie fragen (they ask)
Sie fragen (you ask - formal)

If a verb stem ends in -t or -d (antwort-en, arbeit-en, find-en) or in certain consonant combinations like the -gn in regnen or the -ffn in öffnen, as -e- is inserted before the personal endings -st and -t (du arbeitest, er findet, es regnet):

ich antworte (I answer)
du antwortest (you answer - familiar)
er/es/sie antwortet (he/it/she answers)
wir antworten (we answer)
ihr antwortet (y'all answer)
sie antworten (they answer)
Sie antworten (you answer - formal)

If a verb stem ends in -s, -ß, or -z, the personal ending in the 2nd person singular is only a -t (not an -st): du reist, du heißt, du sitzt:

ich reise (I travel)
du reist (you travel - familiar)
er/es/sie reist (he/it/she travels)
wir reisen (we travel)
ihr reist (y'all travel)
sie reisen (they travel)
Sie reisen (you travel - formal)

Then there's the part I don't get:

Verbs with the infinitive ending -n also have the ending -n in the 1st and 3rd person plural and in the Sie-form: wir tun, sie tun, Sie tun.

So, would it be like this?

ich tue
du tust
er/es/sie tut
wir tun
ihr tun
sie tun
Sie tun

I haven't figured this one out yet from the book, and my prof jets after class, sometimes dismissing class on the way out the door. :(

In any case, I still have to memorize all of this by morning...

Sarevok
09-22-2008, 02:29 AM
So, would it be like this?

ich tue
du tust
er/es/sie tut
wir tun
ihr tun
sie tun
Sie tun
it's "ihr tut"
note that the endings for tun are the same as for all the others. Except that the -en endings lost the -e- and are now -n endings.

Terez
09-22-2008, 02:53 AM
Thankee! :D

Terez
09-22-2008, 02:59 AM
Sare, would you be willing to check this for me?

By memory:

ich frage
du fragst
er/es/sie fragt
wir fragen
ihr fragt
sie fragen
Sie fragen

ich antworte
du antwortest
er/es/sie antwortet
wir antworten
ihr antwortet
sie antworten
Sie antworten

ich reise
du reist
er/es/sie reist
wir reisen
ihr reist
sie reisen
Sie reisen

ich tue
du tust
er/es/sie tut
wir tun
ihr tut
sie tun
Sie tun

I think I've got it...

Here's a fill-in-the-blank exercise I had to do:

Du, Robert, warum stehest du hier und tust nichts?

Warum fragst du?

Vater und ich arbeite im Garten.

Ich glaube, ihr arbeitet zu viel.

Und du, du arbeitest zu wenig.



Ich heiße Sabine. Wie heißt du?

Ich heiße Thomas. Wie findest du die Band?

Die Band spielen sehr gut. Sag mal, tanzt du?

Klar! Komm, wir tanzen.



Am Montag beginnt Schule.

Ja. Heute Nachmittag kaufe ich neue Kleider.

Und wie viel kosten das?

Viel. Kleider kostet viel.

Ja. Kleider und Kinder kosten viel zu viel!



Tag, Frau Berg. Das seit ja kalt!

Ja, das Thermometer zeiget minus zehn!

Wann reisen Sie nach Spanien, Ende Dezember?

Nein, wir reisen erst im Januar, da kostet es nicht so viel.


I hope I got all that right.

GonzoTheGreat
09-22-2008, 04:07 AM
Vater und ich arbeiten im Garten. (Wir arbeiten im Garten.)

Die Band spielt sehr gut. Sag mal, tanzt du? (Er spielt sehr gut. I think. Perhaps Band is plural. German stole that word from english, so anything is possible.)

Am Montag begint Schule. (I would have said "Am Montag begint die Schule.", but that may be old fashioned, a dialect I picked up somewhere, or just plain wrong.)

Und wie viel kostet das?
Viel. Kleider kosten viel.

Tag, Frau Berg. Das ist ja kalt!
Ja, das Thermometer zeignet minus zehn!

I think I would do better than you, but I am not at all sure I have them all correct. Especially with the last two I am not sure. Still, this will give you something to think about.

Terez
09-22-2008, 04:33 AM
Vater und ich arbeiten im Garten. (Wir arbeiten im Garten.) Gah, I should have noticed the "Vater und" part.

Am Montag begint Schule. (I would have said "Am Montag begint die Schule.", but that may be old fashioned, a dialect I picked up somewhere, or just plain wrong.) Nope, you're right about the article which I omitted accidentally. I thought it was "beginnt" though...

Tag, Frau Berg. Das ist ja kalt! On this one, my book told me I had to use a form of the verb "sein" to fill in the blank. I guessed that "das" would follow the same rules as "es", and that "sein" would follow the same rules as "tun", but of course I could be wrong...

Ja, das Thermometer zeignet minus zehn! How does that happen? The book told me I had to use some forum of zeigen, but there's nothing about adding "n" in anything. :confused:

I think I would do better than you
Ha, that's not hard! :p I don't know what half of those words mean! Well, maybe I do know half...

GonzoTheGreat
09-22-2008, 04:53 AM
On this one, my book told me I had to use a form of the verb "sein" to fill in the blank. I guessed that "das" would follow the same rules as "es", and that "sein" would follow the same rules as "tun", but of course I could be wrong...
That bes* a reasonable reasoning, but there's something you should learn about language: the verb "to be" is hardly ever regular, in any language at all.

Sein (esse)
Ich bin (sum)
Du bist (es)
Er ist (est)
Wir sind (sumus)
Ihr seit (estis)
sie sind (sunt)
Sie sind

I've added the latin forms too, partly because I remembered those, and partly because they may help in seeing the relationship. I do not know where english stole the "are" form, now that I think of it. Perhaps it comes from Gaelic.
How does that happen? The book told me I had to use some forum of zeigen, but there's nothing about adding "n" in anything.
In that case you were correct. I had assumed it was derived from "zeignen", and based it on that. If you start out with another verb, then getting different spelling makes sense.
Having checked in a dictionary, I saw that the verb you were told (written? what's the appropriate term, anyway) to use does have the meaning implied by sentence. While the one I thought of was not mentioned at all. That may be because it is a somewhat limited dictionary, but it may also be that the word does not even exist.

* "To wander" gives "he wanders", so "to be" gives "he bes", of course. Or perhaps not.

Terez
09-22-2008, 05:06 AM
This is frustrating because I've never been good at English grammar classes. I just use proper grammar most of the time without thinking - I have no idea what the rules are. :(

There's another box on the same page as the verb forms that I guess I should have paid attention to:

ich bin
du bist
er/es/sie ist
wir sind
ihr seid (you missed that one - though I suppose it sounds the same)
sie sind
Sie sind

Gah, something else to memorize!

GonzoTheGreat
09-22-2008, 05:43 AM
I've managed to look up zeignen, and it turned out that I was wrong. I had botched the spelling. The word I had been thinking of was "zeichnen", which means "to paint/to draw", and a few similar things.
Of course, with that different spelling my assumption that you'd gotten an 'n' wrong rather falls apart, but that is a detail we can overlook, I suppose.

Terez
09-22-2008, 05:45 AM
I'm going to need to do that exercise again, alas. In about another hour or so it should be faded enough from my memory to have a fresh start - since I don't actually know any of this stuff, it fades quickly. :D

Terez
09-22-2008, 07:12 AM
K, here's my second attempt at that particular exercise:

Du, Robert, warum stehest du hier und tust nichts?
Warum fragst du?
Vater ud ich arbeiten im Garten.
Ich glaube, ihr arbeitet zu viel.
Und du, du arbeitest zu wenig.

Ich heiße Sabine. Wie heißt du?
Ich heißse Thomas. Wie findest du die Band?
Die Band spielet sehr gut. Sag mal, tanzt du?
Klar! Komm, wir tanzen.

Am Montag beginnt die Schule.
Ja. Haute Nachmittag kaufe ich neue Kleider.
Und wie viel kostet das?
Viel. Kleider kosten viel.
Ja. Kleider und Kinder kosten viel zu viel!

Tag, Frau Berg. Das ist ja kalt!
Ja, das Thermometer zeiget minus zehn!
Wann reisen Sie nach Spanien, Ende Dezember?
Nein, wir reisen erst im Januar, da kostet nicht so viel.

I hope I did better this time...

GonzoTheGreat
09-22-2008, 07:46 AM
At a guess, I would have some doubts about the "better this time". But considering the grades I used to get for german, it is a bit risky depending too much on my assesments. Still, I think I noticed some mistakes:

Du, Robert, warum stehst du hier und tust nichts? (I'm not sure about this one, and the longer I think the less certain I am. But I think it should not be stehest. That just sounds wrong.)

Ich heiße Thomas.

Die Band spielt sehr gut.

Ja, das Thermometer zeigt minus zehn!

It is annoying that the board does not support strike through. That would have been quite useful, just right about now.

Terez
09-22-2008, 08:03 AM
ha, I have a bad habit of throwing an s in after an ß. I think I'm going to do badly on this quiz. :(

DeiwosTheSkyGod
09-22-2008, 08:25 AM
The plurals of nouns in German are really annoying :mad:

Terez
09-22-2008, 09:03 AM
Yeah, I did badly on that quiz too. :D

Edit: though, come to think of it, I did badly on that quiz mainly because of not being able to keep straight the genders for things that don't have gender...

Ozymandias
09-22-2008, 09:38 AM
I don't understand. Every single language has stolen elements from every other. Given that English has its roots in Germanic languages, how is it surprising that certain words have developed along similar lines?

Gilshalos Sedai
09-22-2008, 09:53 AM
Because most other languages, such as French, for instance, strive to native-fy foreign words. We don't change words, hence "rendez-vous," "fiance(e)," etc.

Terez
09-22-2008, 11:50 AM
I didn't do so bad on the quiz - it was a lot simpler than I suspected it would be. In other words, all I had to do was the listing kind of stuff, and none of that fill-in-the-blank conversation stuff.

Oh, and I was right about beginnt. :D

Sarevok
09-22-2008, 01:53 PM
Note: I wrote this post while reading the thread. Therefore, some things I write may have been discussed before.

Du, Robert, warum stehest du hier und tust nichts?
Not sure, but looks weird

Vater und ich arbeite im Garten.
Father + me = we
==>wir arbeiten

Die Band spielen sehr gut.
"the band" = it (technically she)
==>Die Band spielt

Am Montag beginnt Schule.
I'd say:
"beginnt die Schule"
not sure this one is wrong, though.

Und wie viel kosten das?
"das" = it
==> kostet

Viel. Kleider kostet viel.
Clothes = they
==> kosten

Das seit ja kalt!
"Das" = it
==> ist

Ja, das Thermometer zeiget minus zehn!
==>zeigt

da kostet es nicht so viel.
Should be "dann"
"da" technically means "there"


Ja, das Thermometer zeignet minus zehn!
*kicks Gonzo*
The thermometer does not draw. It "indicates". i.e. "zeigt"




Am Montag begint Schule. (I would have said "Am Montag begint die Schule.", but that may be old fashioned, a dialect I picked up somewhere, or just plain wrong.)
Nope, you're right about the article which I omitted accidentally. I thought it was "beginnt" though...
Terez is right.

On this one, my book told me I had to use a form of the verb "sein" to fill in the blank.
I guessed that "das" would follow the same rules as "es",
correct
and that "sein" would follow the same rules as "tun", but of course I could be wrong...
Uhm... no, "sein" = "to be" wich follows no rules in all the languages I know of...

Die Band spielet sehr gut. Sag mal, tanzt du?
==> spielt

Du, Robert, warum stehst du hier und tust nichts? (I'm not sure about this one, and the longer I think the less certain I am. But I think it should not be stehest. That just sounds wrong.)
seconded

We don't change words, hence "rendez-vous," "fiance(e)," etc.
*points at the dropped é in fiancé(e)*

Terez
09-22-2008, 02:47 PM
We don't do funny symbols over letters. :p

Gilshalos Sedai
09-23-2008, 07:32 AM
That's not a dropped "e," Sare. Techinically, you're supposed to add an "e," for women and keep it to the single "e," for men.

Sarevok
09-23-2008, 07:52 AM
That's not a dropped "e," Sare. Techinically, you're supposed to add an "e," for women and keep it to the single "e," for men.
I know that, I've even been telling that to (I think it was Dav) when het talked about his fiance.
I was referring to the ' above e.

Gilshalos Sedai
09-23-2008, 07:55 AM
So, that means we didn't alter it, since the French do the same.

Anaiya Sedai
09-23-2008, 08:00 AM
wow, sare did with that long post what I've been trying to stop myself from doing. lol.

I'd say:
"beginnt die Schule"
not sure this one is wrong, though.
it is.

and I note terez seems to be using the kind of language that would have been used for schubert songs, but that nobody would actually speak. "stehest, zeiget"

uhm.. my 2 pennies.

Terez
09-23-2008, 09:53 AM
I'm just doing what the book tells me to. And you're the second person to correct me on something that I already said was a mistake of omission. :p

GonzoTheGreat
09-23-2008, 10:32 AM
Third, I think. At least, if I get what you're talking about (die Schule). I told you, Sarevok told you, and now Anaiya is the third. Back to school for you, it seems. :p

Terez
09-23-2008, 10:33 AM
Third, I think. At least, if I get what you're talking about (die Schule). I told you, Sarevok told you, and now Anaiya is the third. Back to school for you, it seems. :p
You pointed it out before I pointed out it was an error of omission. ;)