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Artur pendragon
11-14-2012, 06:29 PM
anyone see any transcripts or videos of what brandon was reading while on tour of Stormlight 2?

Sarevok
11-15-2012, 03:25 AM
Audio + video on 17th Shard:
http://www.17thshard.com/news/brandon-news/brandon-reads-a-scene-from-stormlight-2-r112

Southpaw2012
10-23-2013, 03:23 PM
I wish this came out sooner:/

yks 6nnetu hing
02-06-2014, 06:49 AM
Less than a month to go :D

Matoyak
02-16-2014, 08:31 PM
Less than a month to go :D:D:D:D Yesssssss. I've got both the hardcover and the kindle version pre-ordered - calling 'em an early birthday present to myself :p

Southpaw2012
02-25-2014, 11:56 PM
One more week!!!

Sarevok
02-26-2014, 03:52 AM
I have a day off on the 5th, and the bookstore better have it in stock, or I might have to hurt someone over there. :)

Isabel
02-26-2014, 04:48 AM
I would suggest we check the bookstores in amsterdam this saturday. I wouldnt be surprised if we find one. (Although i will wait on the ebook, because i want to read it on holiday:)

Sarevok
02-27-2014, 05:42 PM
I would suggest we check the bookstores in amsterdam this saturday. I wouldnt be surprised if we find one. (Although i will wait on the ebook, because i want to read it on holiday:)

Good idea. :D

Tedman
02-28-2014, 08:35 PM
Was a bit sad no NY event, think its been 3 straight books without a NY one for Brandon, too bad really.

Terez
03-10-2014, 07:19 PM
I finished it yesterday and came here expecting to find some actual discussion of the book. Silly me. :)

Oatman
03-11-2014, 03:22 AM
I finished it yesterday and came here expecting to find some actual discussion of the book. Silly me.

Didn't feel like starting the discussion yourself?

I thought the book was great. A lot happened, but it was extremely well paced, I never felt like the story was being rushed, and there was no parts of the book that dragged out too long, which I was worried would happen with certain parts (Kaladins distrust of Dalinar for example)

I'm not sure about the introduction of elements from other Cosmere stories. I realise this started in TWOK, but that was only minor compared to the reveal at the end of WOR. I will wait to see how he handles it before forming an opinion.

There was a lot of information revealed that I was not expecting to be revealed so early, considering the length that the series is supposed to be. It makes me wonder what he has planned from here, which is good.

Overall, one of the best books I've read recently. It met and exceeded 4 years of expectation, which is an accomplishment in itself.

yks 6nnetu hing
03-11-2014, 03:33 AM
I'm saving it for our vacation... which is in April :P

Matoyak
03-11-2014, 06:39 PM
I'm not sure about the introduction of elements from other Cosmere stories. I realise this started in TWOK, but that was only minor compared to the reveal at the end of WOR. I will wait to see how he handles it before forming an opinion.Seeker and I have long been of the opinion that the Stormlight Archive is a meta series. This book only helped cement that. Sanderson has said he will keep it to where you do not have to know anything about the Cosmere to enjoy or understand the series itself (iirc, he's stated there's only a few cases where he wouldn't do that, and he'd ensure to advertise that fact well in advance of the book itself), but... I dunno. I suppose you could enjoy and understand this series without having read the others, but you're missing out on so much background. "Hello. Would you like to destroy some evil today?" only really hits as hard as it ought to if you've read Warbreaker, for instance.
I have a few threads I'd like to start about theories and questions I have, but I wanna get a second read of the book in first (well... I read it the first time, second time I'm listening to audio book. I catch different things in the different mediums).

Terez
03-11-2014, 08:33 PM
Reading TWOK was an odd experience because I was enjoying the book a lot more before I read the ending. WOR had the same effect on me. In both books, there were some things thrown in at the ending that seemed rushed, weakly crafted, and anticlimactic. I am rereading TWOK now (slowly), which tells you something about my experience of the story so far, but both book endings left me disappointed. That's why I didn't want to start the discussion; formulaic situations are tedious for everyone.

Res_Ipsa
03-14-2014, 02:04 AM
Non-spoiler question. Did you enjoy 2 more than 1? On par? Worse?

I am picking up my copy when the tour comes near me on the 19th. I will still read it, but I would like some general impressions.

Terez
03-14-2014, 02:55 AM
I enjoyed 2 more than 1, overall. In general, it seemed to be more tightly crafted than TWOK, but the end felt very loose and thin to me, which is not to say there was nothing good about the end. There was; I just think certain developments could have been done better.

Uno
03-14-2014, 11:15 AM
I enjoyed 2 more than 1, overall. In general, it seemed to be more tightly crafted than TWOK, but the end felt very loose and thin to me, which is not to say there was nothing good about the end. There was; I just think certain developments could have been done better.

I liked it, but every now and then Sanderson throws in some really jarring and incongruous language that tends to shatter the illusion. At one point, two characters had a brief discussion of the word "sexist," a term that's really culturally specific to the 20th and 21st centuries in our world. And the moment when he had Shallan say "Yay for originality!" pretty much speaks for itself.

Zombie Sammael
03-21-2014, 02:00 AM
I liked it, but every now and then Sanderson throws in some really jarring and incongruous language that tends to shatter the illusion. At one point, two characters had a brief discussion of the word "sexist," a term that's really culturally specific to the 20th and 21st centuries in our world. And the moment when he had Shallan say "Yay for originality!" pretty much speaks for itself.

I actually felt that the moments where Shallan seems a little incongruous to the world and the expectations we have of her character were important moments for her that spoke to her core personality. Moments like that may have drawn us out of the story, but they reminded us that Shallan is a character who behaves in unexpected and sometimes seemingly outrageous ways, which goes to her arc in this book that suggests someone who has experienced the hardship she has could be expected to just lay down and die, but of course she doesn't because she is above that.

As to the use of the word "sexist", it's clear that the world of Roshar has a comparable gender divide to WOT, but with the women placed in the position of following scholarly pursuits and the men martial, and a clear element of male dominance, it stands to reason that there is some consideration of gender issues, a fact that is borne out from Jasnah's excerpt on "a woman's role". For that reason, I don't really feel the use of the word "sexist" was out of place, especially if you adopt the notion that Brandon is merely translating the character's words in Alethi to English for the benefit of his readers. I mean, you wouldn't really complain about a villain being described as sadistic, would you?

rand
03-21-2014, 02:45 AM
I haven't had the chance to read Radiance yet (and I still need to reread tWoK first), but I think it's easy enough to convey the idea of sexism without having to use the word itself. One problem I've have with Brandon's writing in general (and this may have improved in WoR) is that he sometimes tries to have his characters sound "medievaly" while other times he simply uses 20/21st century words that really jar you out of the story. I remember reading an early release a little while ago where he kept using the word "awesomeness" and it just made me cringe every time.

Anyway, I'll read this one soon, hopefully. I really liked tWoK.

Zombie Sammael
03-21-2014, 03:31 AM
I haven't had the chance to read Radiance yet (and I still need to reread tWoK first), but I think it's easy enough to convey the idea of sexism without having to use the word itself. One problem I've have with Brandon's writing in general (and this may have improved in WoR) is that he sometimes tries to have his characters sound "medievaly" while other times he simply uses 20/21st century words that really jar you out of the story. I remember reading an early release a little while ago where he kept using the word "awesomeness" and it just made me cringe every time.

Anyway, I'll read this one soon, hopefully. I really liked tWoK.

Once again, it's in character.

I think it's also important to point out that while we often think of fantasy as having a medieval setting and fantasy heroes often use swords and other melee weapons rather than firearms, kings and monarchs instead of democracies, a fantasy series is not automatically set in a medieval world. This is the case with Stormlight. Shardblades and shardplate are theoretically much more effective weapons than guns. But the world also has relatively advanced medicine, modern-like bureaucracies, and even an equivalent of instant messaging.

You'd never find a character like Kaladin or Szeth using the word "awesomeness", but for Lift it makes perfect sense, fitting in with the tone of her characterisation. I just don't see the problem with "sexism"; it describes a concept, and it stands to reason that that concept exists on Roshar.

Uno
03-21-2014, 03:31 AM
One problem I've have with Brandon's writing in general (and this may have improved in WoR) is that he sometimes tries to have his characters sound "medievaly" while other times he simply uses 20/21st century words that really jar you out of the story. I remember reading an early release a little while ago where he kept using the word "awesomeness" and it just made me cringe every time.


He did this kind of thing when he wrote for WOT, too. It boils down to the man not being that sensitive to langauge. He's a compent story teller, but his language skills need some work.

Terez
03-21-2014, 06:48 AM
He did this kind of thing when he wrote for WOT, too. It boils down to the man not being that sensitive to langauge.
Fortunately (or unfortunately) for him, most of his readers aren't either.

You misspelled language. ;)

Zombie Sammael
03-21-2014, 08:08 AM
He did this kind of thing when he wrote for WOT, too. It boils down to the man not being that sensitive to langauge. He's a compent story teller, but his language skills need some work.

I seem to be the only person willing to defend Brandon's writing on this thread. Perhaps I'm the only person left on Theoryland not prepared to whinge that he isn't Robert Jordan, even when he's writing his own works.

But I would argue that this, at least, is a post-WOT Brandon. If his skill with language has not increased, then his awareness of it certainly has. Uses of words like "awesomeness" are deliberate choices, choices made by the characters that show their character, not the slip-ups of a writer who simply doesn't care. This world he has built is not a typical fantasy world; it no more follows typical fantasy rules than the work of China Mieville does. Therefore, he does not need to be constrained by the typical use of language.

As I said above, in the case of Shallan, it demonstrates - better than in WoK by far, in fact - her inappropriateness. This is a character who is meant to be mouthy, meant to backtalk to her betters, meant to be defiant. In the case of Lift and her "awesomeness", it tells us something about her social class, her level of education.

These aren't the slip-ups of an amateur as some members seem to want to paint them; they're the deliberate choices of a professional, appropriate to his world, and telling us something about that world as well as the characters within it. No, his language is not up to the heights of Robert Jordan at his best, or Tolkien writing The Silmarillion, or Stephen Donaldson showing off with every second word. But he is far from an incompetent, "insensitive" to the choices he is making. That's obvious from WoR; he was chosen to finish the Wheel of Time, and he could not complete that task without learning from it.

Terez
03-21-2014, 08:54 AM
The sexism thing doesn't bother me. 'Awesomeness' on the other hand made it hard to take the scene seriously. I recognize it was a deliberate choice, and I can understand why some people liked it, but it jerked me out of the story a bit. I think Brandon's prose has improved a lot but the minimalist approach is probably a permanent part of his style, and it's the minimalism I generally don't like. We are left to guess, for the most part, what people are thinking, how they feel about things, how they react to things, what makes them tick, etc.

Zombie Sammael
03-21-2014, 09:14 AM
The sexism thing doesn't bother me. 'Awesomeness' on the other hand made it hard to take the scene seriously. I recognize it was a deliberate choice, and I can understand why some people liked it, but it jerked me out of the story a bit. I think Brandon's prose has improved a lot but the minimalist approach is probably a permanent part of his style, and it's the minimalism I generally don't like. We are left to guess, for the most part, what people are thinking, how they feel about things, how they react to things, what makes them tick, etc.

I think that is demonstrated through their dialogue and their actions. I don't need to have everything spelled out for me. On the other hand, he has to take care with characters like Shallan, otherwise it can start feeling like everything's a joke, and the minimalist approach can start to feel like Pratchett-esque characterisation. That's probably why Shallan is the most tragic character in the books so far - that and to contrast her with the much more dour Kaladin. But I don't really need a six page treatise on Lopen's inner feelings about Moash to know that Moash wants to kill someone important.

yks 6nnetu hing
03-21-2014, 09:43 AM
I seem to be the only person willing to defend Brandon's writing on this thread. Perhaps I'm the only person left on Theoryland not prepared to whinge that he isn't Robert Jordan, even when he's writing his own works.

But I would argue that this, at least, is a post-WOT Brandon. If his skill with language has not increased, then his awareness of it certainly has. Uses of words like "awesomeness" are deliberate choices, choices made by the characters that show their character, not the slip-ups of a writer who simply doesn't care. This world he has built is not a typical fantasy world; it no more follows typical fantasy rules than the work of China Mieville does. Therefore, he does not need to be constrained by the typical use of language.

As I said above, in the case of Shallan, it demonstrates - better than in WoK by far, in fact - her inappropriateness. This is a character who is meant to be mouthy, meant to backtalk to her betters, meant to be defiant. In the case of Lift and her "awesomeness", it tells us something about her social class, her level of education.

These aren't the slip-ups of an amateur as some members seem to want to paint them; they're the deliberate choices of a professional, appropriate to his world, and telling us something about that world as well as the characters within it. No, his language is not up to the heights of Robert Jordan at his best, or Tolkien writing The Silmarillion, or Stephen Donaldson showing off with every second word. But he is far from an incompetent, "insensitive" to the choices he is making. That's obvious from WoR; he was chosen to finish the Wheel of Time, and he could not complete that task without learning from it.

for what it's worth, I agree.

Of course, there are writers who produce more beautiful prose, but theere are many, many, many more authors who produce much worse prose. In the grand scheme of things, I'd much rather read Brandon's version of Twilight than I would want to read Stephanie Meyer's version of Mistborn.

Uno
03-21-2014, 09:45 AM
But I would argue that this, at least, is a post-WOT Brandon. If his skill with language has not increased, then his awareness of it certainly has. Uses of words like "awesomeness" are deliberate choices, choices made by the characters that show their character, not the slip-ups of a writer who simply doesn't care. This world he has built is not a typical fantasy world; it no more follows typical fantasy rules than the work of China Mieville does. Therefore, he does not need to be constrained by the typical use of language.

I'm not sure about how deliberate he is. Shallan is meant to be mouthy, yes, but I don't think it's a good choice to have her use words in senses that are so contemporary that people wouldn't have recognized his usage just a few years ago. "Awesome" in the way Shallan uses it is quite modern slang and the rather dorky "yay for" is even more so. How is this going to sound to readers a few years from now, when these terms are just corny relics from a past decade? Suppose the book was written in the 60s and Shallan had said "groovy"?

Uno
03-21-2014, 09:49 AM
Fortunately (or unfortunately) for him, most of his readers aren't either.

You misspelled language. ;)

That's what's called a typo. And you're what's called a troll.

Terez
03-21-2014, 11:28 AM
Nah, if I had thought you would get angry about me pointing out an ironic typo, then I would be a troll. ;)

Terez
03-21-2014, 11:49 AM
I think that is demonstrated through their dialogue and their actions.
That is where I disagree. I'm not saying we don't get bits of it; I'm just saying it's not enough for me to get into the characters or the scenes, with rare exceptions.

I don't need to have everything spelled out for me.
There is a difference between giving depth to things and spelling them out. One of the things I like about RJ is that he did the former, but not the latter.

But I don't really need a six page treatise on Lopen's inner feelings about Moash to know that Moash wants to kill someone important.
Who does? Everyone knows why and can see the logic of it; it's just whether or not his situation feels real to us.

It is not my intent here to get into a Brandon-bashing debate; I had actually forgotten how easily those get started here. I enjoyed the book, for many reasons, and with many reservations; the rest is just talk.

Uno
03-21-2014, 11:59 AM
Nah, if I had thought you would get angry about me pointing out an ironic typo, then I would be a troll. ;)

It wouldn't annoy me much if it were the first time you'd done it, but it's not. Considering how little we've directly interacted on these boards over the years, I can't help but feel that it's a rather striking pattern of behaviour.

Terez
03-21-2014, 12:10 PM
If it's a pattern of behavior, it's probably just a simple matter of my sense of humor being occasionally different from yours. We have not interacted much, but when we have (always at my initiative), I have always made it clear that I have a great deal of respect for you. I'm not sure why you would choose to ignore that in the face of my occasional grammar-nazism which is hardly limited to you or serious in any way.

Matoyak
03-21-2014, 05:08 PM
This world he has built is not a typical fantasy world; it no more follows typical fantasy rules than the work of China Mieville does.On top of that, there is a time-frame to consider. This isn't really the equivalent of our medieval period here on Earth. It's been 4500 Rosharan years since Aharietiam (depending on length of day, that's ~7700 Earth years, give or take a couple of decades.*) That isn't counting the time before Aharietiam / the Heraldic Epochs. Given what we know about the Heralds, and from what we learn from Talenel in WoR, that time period of the Epocks was likely nearly as long. Heck, even if we give it as short a period as 2000 Earth years [~1100ish+/- Rosharan years], that overall time period is roughly equivalent to the amount of time humankind here on Earth has had since the Agricultural Revolution. ... kinda rambling, but my point is that their languages would have evolved and been butchered over time as all languages are, and it's entirely possible stuff like "originality" and phrases praising it, or kids adding "ness" to the end of stuff like "awesome" were things that might have happened. ~shrug~ Hell, they might have picked it up from the many worldhoppers that seem to pass through Roshar that are from way more advanced, modern-style civilizations than what Roshar currently has.

Though that's all just kind of excuses, really, though I do like Sanderson's writing style myself. It's rather minimalistic, and I think it works well for him. As for these examples: No, his language is not up to the heights of Robert Jordan at his best, or Tolkien writing The Silmarillion, or Stephen Donaldson showing off with every second word.I can't stand Tokien's prose, Robert Jordan it REALLY depended on the book (Sometimes he was fantastic, sometimes not even close), and Donaldson...I don't know any of Donaldson, so I can't say :p. IMO, if you wish to talk about prose worth praising, Patrick Rothfuss is the example.

*One Rosharan year is 500 days

rand
03-21-2014, 05:42 PM
The fact that Brandon used the same langauge in WoT (which is supposed to be a Medieval setting) seems to show that he simply uses this language for anything he writes, regardless of the setting. I don't think it's a huge issue; I'm certainly not bashing BS for it, but I'll admit that I think his books would be better if he used different diction. Like Terez said, it's hard to take some parts seriously because of the words he chooses.

And I completely understand that the concepts of sexism and originality etc. are within character for Shallan to argue about, I just meant that Brandon could find better (or at least different) words to show what he means.

And I agree, Mato--Rothfuss is great with prose.

Uno
03-21-2014, 07:29 PM
If it's a pattern of behavior, it's probably just a simple matter of my sense of humor being occasionally different from yours. We have not interacted much, but when we have (always at my initiative), I have always made it clear that I have a great deal of respect for you. I'm not sure why you would choose to ignore that in the face of my occasional grammar-nazism which is hardly limited to you or serious in any way.

Well, fair enough. I suppose troll was a strong word to use, all things considered.

Davian93
03-21-2014, 08:30 PM
I liked it, but every now and then Sanderson throws in some really jarring and incongruous language that tends to shatter the illusion. At one point, two characters had a brief discussion of the word "sexist," a term that's really culturally specific to the 20th and 21st centuries in our world. And the moment when he had Shallan say "Yay for originality!" pretty much speaks for itself.

One million times this. There were probably a good dozen times where a word was used and it completely jarred me out of the story.

"Exorcism" springs to mind...use of "yeah", etc.

That and the fact that all his "funny" characters in all of his books sound exactly alike. You know, its not necessary to have a "fast quipping funny character" in every single story you write.

Davian93
03-21-2014, 08:34 PM
I'm not sure about how deliberate he is. Shallan is meant to be mouthy, yes, but I don't think it's a good choice to have her use words in senses that are so contemporary that people wouldn't have recognized his usage just a few years ago. "Awesome" in the way Shallan uses it is quite modern slang and the rather dorky "yay for" is even more so. How is this going to sound to readers a few years from now, when these terms are just corny relics from a past decade? Suppose the book was written in the 60s and Shallan had said "groovy"?

Exactly.


Overall, its a good book and a good story so far but let's at least be honest about this issue...its one that has occurred throughout every single book he's written including all 3 WoT books. Its not "on purpose" as you would want it to be, Zombie.

Res_Ipsa
03-22-2014, 02:00 AM
Just finished.

Spoiler thoughts:

1. Jasnah not being dead dead was over-telegraphed when Shallan did not see any blood.
2. I don't like the fact that obtaining a shard blade makes one a lighteyes as opposed to a dark eyes, which would suggest that there is something different about the two. I thought the point of the series was using it as an example of useless prejudice.

3. Last 150 pages had me worried to turn the page and wonder what would happen, lots of people survived, which kind of made me look back and wonder why I was so worried.

Time to sleep now.

Tedman
03-23-2014, 03:21 AM
Just finished.

Spoiler thoughts:

1. Jasnah not being dead dead was over-telegraphed when Shallan did not see any blood.
2. I don't like the fact that obtaining a shard blade makes one a lighteyes as opposed to a dark eyes, which would suggest that there is something different about the two. I thought the point of the series was using it as an example of useless prejudice.

3. Last 150 pages had me worried to turn the page and wonder what would happen, lots of people survived, which kind of made me look back and wonder why I was so worried.

Time to sleep now.

isn't the entire point of the story, now 100% confirmed, that "light eyes" is a term more like "sir", but just happens to be descrptive in a way that gets muddled and confused over the long course of time.

Much like how Knight can be used to describe a lot of warriors in the Medevial time, but it actually meant something very specific.

So light eyes referred to Radiants, but it became a social Alethi thing based on nothing. I had thought this was the obvious direction and that the eyes would end up White from use of storm light, kind of like Saa for Moridin.

Sarevok
03-23-2014, 05:03 PM
Finished the book today. Loved it! :D

Davian93
03-24-2014, 08:45 AM
Does anyone else think Adolin is gonna end up in a bad way given his essentially cold-blooded murder of Sadeas, regardless of how much Sadeas deserved it that's not exactly the act of a "radiant" like the rest of his family so I could easily see that being a massive red flag for him turning out bad somehow.

Thoughts?

Sarevok
03-24-2014, 02:43 PM
Well, either he's going to end up turning "bad", or, as I read someone suggeting on another forum, he's going down the road the others have been on before and end up a Radiant eventually. Since the spren seem to be bonding to people that are in some way or other broken.
Excuse the convoluted sentence, but I'm not going to re-type it. :p

Sarevok
03-26-2014, 10:20 AM
For those interested: 17thshard.com translated the number-coded chapter title of chapter 84:
Hold the secret that broke the Knights Radiant. You may need it to destroy the new orders when they return.

Also, in Shallan's drawing of the lait, you can see some of Jasnah's note that were on the back of the page. They managed to get some of that, too:
The statement that intrigues me though is that of King Nohadon which implies Urithiru could be reached [from] [within] cities. If such a thing were possible, evidence of the roads [could] be in place among the Kingdoms of today. I <have> since <visited> <the> [_______] [______] and found what I believe to be gateways there, but the [______] [____] [____] ones and how to work them is likely too dangerous to activate them <in> the center of a populated city as I [_____________] planned with my uncle. I hope to find them in unpopulated [__________]
Note that's it's actually phonetic:
Thu Statmint That Intregs Me Thou Is That Uv Keng Nohudan hch implis
Urithiru Kod Be Rechd If [__ __] [Uv___ Md__] Sites If [_____ __] [Thaag]
War Pasibli Evadins Uv Thu Rods [__________] Be In Plas Umung Thu
Kengdums Uf Toda I Lav Sens Vitod [Th_________u] [S______] and Faond
Wut I Belev To Be Gatwas Ther But Thu [____ba] [_dgr] [A____] m
Uns An Hao To Work Them Is Likle To Dangerus To Aktuvat Them On Thu
Senter Of a Populatd Site As I [Ag_________du] Pland With Mi Unkl
I Hop To Find Them En Unpapulatid [_________]

They also translated the thaylen script on the map of the Frostlands, but that's hard to link, so I'll just link the thread:
http://www.17thshard.com/forum/topic/6487-thaylen-and-alethi-glyph-translation/?hl=drawing

Anaiya Sedai
04-06-2014, 08:16 AM
I enjoyed it.
The awesomeness thing got me at first, but as the PoV continues, it actually fits in quite well with her character. Reminds me a bit of Rikku from FFX.
Yay for individuality.. random but didn't bother me.
Having just read Way of Shadows by Brent Weeks before WoR, I found Brandon's writing better. Weeks used the term "Spartan", which actually had Me wondering whether I'm just a bit anal to be bothered by the use of language.

it took me until after Shallan's and Kaladin's chasm scene to catch on to Jasnah.

Wit intrigues me.

Re-reading now then would quite like some more discussion.

SauceyBlueConfetti
04-08-2014, 11:10 AM
I liked it

I like the Interludes. Bits and pieces of things to come, or explanations of slow building ideas.

I need to re-read Way of Kings now though.

I am not doing spoiler tags, anyone coming here should have read the book, otherwise why look at the thread? I will use spoiler space though...


space
space
space

you get it, space

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Adolin might be a key to all of this, but I don't think so much a BAD thing. Maybe a different direction, and what we SEE now as good/possibly right could be total misdirection. RENARIN on the other hand strikes me as being where the trouble lies, as he can see the future and doesn't seem totally in his right mind. That obviously could be as explained, he thought he was nuts. But he could be a bit of a wild card.

Love Wit, but might get old. Fast.

I like the Bridge Four folks being part of the Knights Radiant "group" if not true Radiants. There is a Malazan feeling to that. Ewwww, that will piss off people, lololol.

Syl rocks. Screw you daddy-o HE IS MINE! I don't care if it is against the rules.

Uno
04-09-2014, 06:52 AM
I need to re-read Way of Kings now though.

You know, there ought to be enough in this series to make me excited enough to re-read and analyze things--there are plenty of interesting things one could discuss-- but I don't think I have it in me to engage any book series on that level any longer. I think it's just an age thing. I was so much younger when I started reading WOT, and I can't seem to muster that level of enthusiasm at this age.

As to Wit, I started thinking that I was in Robin Hobb's universe when I read that. I actually thought "oh, right, the golden fool" before I realized it was wholly the wrong series.

Davian93
04-10-2014, 12:58 PM
You know, there ought to be enough in this series to make me excited enough to re-read and analyze things--there are plenty of interesting things one could discuss-- but I don't think I have it in me to engage any book series on that level any longer. I think it's just an age thing. I was so much younger when I started reading WOT, and I can't seem to muster that level of enthusiasm at this age.

As to Wit, I started thinking that I was in Robin Hobb's universe when I read that. I actually thought "oh, right, the golden fool" before I realized it was wholly the wrong series.

LOL...sadly this is accurate for me too.

Uno
04-10-2014, 07:41 PM
LOL...sadly this is accurate for me too.

I guess we just got old and boring. Well, more boring, in my case. Boringer, you might say. Due to our rather predictable lifestyle, MS does sometimes refer to us as Mr. and Mrs. Boring, which is wildly inaccurate. It should be Dr. and Mrs. Boring.

yks 6nnetu hing
04-17-2014, 07:19 AM
I finished it. I liked it a lot. Though I have to agree, the end left me... sort of at odds, wishing there'd been more. I guess the end of book 1 was more satisfactory (for me) as sort of an epic redemption; but the end of book 2 was more insecure. There was a lot of new information, very tightly packed together, and it's only raising questions; with very few answers.

I agree that for Lift character "awesomeness" fit the character. I did notice that there are apparently fairly few synonyms for "storm" in the English language. I did not like the use of "yeah" and "yup" - but then, I don't like the use of those in real life so that might be it.

I really loved the different characterization from book 1 - How Kaladin is still Kaladin but much less likable. How Adolin is still Adolin but seen from Kaladin's point of view he's such a puppy... I really loved Shallan's backstory. Her somewhat manic behaviour is (to me, at least) explained more when she says to Kaladin that she's insane. I liked what little we saw of Jasnah; though I really REALLY hope she won't turn into a Moiraine. Also, I agree: Wit is way similar to the Fool, sometimes distractingly so. However, the court jester role does fit in the genre so... I kind of pretended that Hoid knew that and is playing the role deliberately. I was rather bothered by that whole Herdazian trope, even though I like Lopin as a character. I mean, "Little Herdaz" - really?

Plot-wise going ahead, it'll be interesting to see how the dynamics change as Dalinar, Kaladin, Shallan AND Renarin are Radiants but Adolin - the former golden boy - is... not. of course, I wouldn't be surprised if he becomes one anyways, but at least the beginning of book 3 will probably do something with that power shift. I want ot know if Jasnah is really alive or if that was some sort of a trick. I want to know more of this Nightwatcher character. And, I want Elhokar to man up.

SauceyBlueConfetti
04-18-2014, 12:23 PM
Plot-wise going ahead, it'll be interesting to see how the dynamics change as Dalinar, Kaladin, Shallan AND Renarin are Radiants but Adolin - the former golden boy - is... not.


What an interesting dynamic however...the Knights Radiant were demonized and to be feared for their prior actions (which we still do not yet have a full accounting). Now out of the blue your father, your brother, your sometimes foe/sometimes friend/sometimes protector and your love are all 'bad guys' in the eyes of the rest of the world?

Adolin could become the actual protector of the Knights. Or, he will continue to be the one 'left behind'. Which could tie things together in other ways from WoK, eh? ;)

Finishing up Lions of Al-Rassan right now, but WoK is next up for a re-read.

Matoyak
04-27-2014, 02:37 AM
Also, I agree: Wit is way similar to the Fool, sometimes distractingly so. However, the court jester role does fit in the genre so... I kind of pretended that Hoid knew that and is playing the role deliberately.No need to pretend: He is absolutely playing that role. Very intentionally so. It's a thing he does a lot - He was literally the "Imperial Fool" during the time of The Emperor's Soul (he's the one who betrayed Shai). He's also obsessed with stories, and the roles people play in those stories. It's a role that allows him to have access to the higher powers of a region without being forced to be a big player himself. Fits for the more observer-type he tends to be.