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Southpaw2012
07-12-2013, 08:40 PM
Any Pratchett fans here? I know Brandon loves him and he's really popular. I've only read two of his books, Guards Guards and Men at Arms, and loved them both. What do you guys/gals think? Any particular favorite books of his?

Mort
07-13-2013, 02:15 AM
Any Pratchett fans here? I know Brandon loves him and he's really popular. I've only read two of his books, Guards Guards and Men at Arms, and loved them both. What do you guys/gals think? Any particular favorite books of his?

Guess one of my fav books :)

You need to read the Rincewind books. Those are absolutely killer. Start with The Colour of Magic.

I've read a few of the ones about the witches but I'm not a big fan of those books, they are okay but the ones about the Citywatch (among the ones you mentioned), the ones about Death himself, Rincewind and several of the more standalone type of books are brilliant.

There are a few die hard fans here :)

Sarevok
07-13-2013, 03:25 AM
I love all Discworld books, except for the witches. They're just annoying. :(

Nazbaque
07-15-2013, 04:06 PM
Oh come on the witch books have some of the best jokes in the whole series. I've read every one of Sir Terry's DW books at least five times and most more than ten times and I still keep finding new jokes that went over my head on previous reads.

As for reading order recomendations, since you liked the first two city watch books you will no doubt enjoy Soul Music and Hogfather but before them you should read Mort, Moving Pictures and Reaperman. You can pretty much read the first twenty books in any order so long as you read the individual arcs in the right order and Moving Pictures should be among the first books you read. I advise concentrating on one arc at a time instead of the chronological order so long as you don't go beyond the twenty mark as about there the world has been fully created and starts evolving instead with every book adding new twists to the world.

I'd say your next book should be either Moving Pictures or Feet of Clay (the third city watch book) and then choose your next arc (Rincewind, witches or Death) Pyramids and Small Gods are stand alone books that you can read at any point and Equal Rites isn't exactly a part of the witches arc but more of a prequel to it.

As for my personal favourites. Well I'm not sure if favourite is the right word as it's more of a mood thing, but the top five that I really keep reading over and over again would be The Last Continent, Monstrous Regiment, Unseen Academicals, Feet of Clay and Reaperman.

Figbiscuit
07-23-2013, 10:12 AM
Huge fan, huge, massive, absolutely batty about the man, I love him muchly.

I have never met an author so clever with his words (which, as you can see, I'm really not). He has the incredible ability to see right to the heart of human nature, and then sum it up with a few brilliantly choice words. To those who call DW fantasy I cry nay. They go much deeper than that, especially the later books.

With regards to reading order, I'm old school, and have mostly read them in release date order, admittedly because I've been buying them for a long time, so there was none of this following an arc business back then. Also there are odd little links between some of the arcs which you'd otherwise probably miss. Plus I like the variance of switching from one place and character set to another with each new book I pick up.

The earlier books are quite heavy on the jokes, and the character development doesn't really start until Guards Guards and beyond. If I recommend the series to someone I normally advise starting with that unless they are a purist and want to start at the beginning. Which you've already done anyway, so there you go.

As Naz said, Pyramids and Small Gods are pretty stand alone, Small Gods is one of my absolute favourites. I would advise against getting ahead of yourself in a particular storyline tho, if you're the kind of person who doesn't like spoilers as some of the character development is really quite special, especially in the Watch books.

Enjoy. Man I wish I was able to go back and read them all from the start as if I'd never heard of them before.

I love all Discworld books, except for the witches. They're just annoying. :(

*slaps Sare upside the head*

Figbiscuit
07-23-2013, 10:15 AM
And for the record, my personal favourites are Small Gods, The Fifth Elephant, Nightwatch and generally most of the Witch books *stares hard at Sare*

Nazbaque
07-23-2013, 02:30 PM
Sare I advise using preemptive meekness on Fig.

GonzoTheGreat
07-23-2013, 02:50 PM
Sare I advise using preemptive meekness on Fig.
Or some other kind of headology.

Nei
07-26-2013, 09:07 AM
I am a huge fan of the Discworld series, especially the City Watch and Witch books. They have amazing re-read value I find, never get tired of them. It's kinda detrimental to my resolve to get started on new series >_>

It's a bit depressing though. His last few books have been more or less wrapping up individual storylines in an open ended way but more than that his writing's gotten noticeably darker in tone. I Shall Wear Midnight was soul crushing in some points and Snuff actually had Sybil swearing I was like 'woah, wut?'.

Here's hoping he manages to retain the cynical cheer and wit of Moist in the next book. At least I hope it's a Moist book.

Sarevok
07-26-2013, 09:24 AM
And for the record, my personal favourites are Small Gods, The Fifth Elephant, Nightwatch and generally most of the Witch books *stares hard at Sare*

*considers calling Aes Sedai for backup*

*realizes that might be conter-productive...*

Figbiscuit
07-29-2013, 09:26 AM
I am a huge fan of the Discworld series, especially the City Watch and Witch books. They have amazing re-read value I find, never get tired of them. It's kinda detrimental to my resolve to get started on new series >_>

It's a bit depressing though. His last few books have been more or less wrapping up individual storylines in an open ended way but more than that his writing's gotten noticeably darker in tone. I Shall Wear Midnight was soul crushing in some points and Snuff actually had Sybil swearing I was like 'woah, wut?'.

Here's hoping he manages to retain the cynical cheer and wit of Moist in the next book. At least I hope it's a Moist book.

Whether he would have still been wrapping up storylines had he not been diagnosed with PCD, I don't know, but I agree that the plot-lines have been getting noticable darker. I Shall Wear Midnight had hard points by any standards, never mind that it was written as young adult fiction. That's one thing I love about him, his unashamed refusal to pander to what society views as 'normal and acceptable' for teen readers. Lets face it, irl they deal with as much and more than Tiffany goes through in that book, just without the magic.

I'd also just like to take a minute to respect an author, who as a 60+ year old man can so successfully write a series of novels from the POV of a girl from the ages of 11 to 16. Brilliance personified.

As for the next book, all I know is that it will be called Raising Steam. Who the main protagonist is I don't know, but if it's really about trains then it could well be Moist. There are also rumours that it could be the last DW proper book :(

Have you read any of his non-DW books?

Figbiscuit
07-29-2013, 09:30 AM
*considers calling Aes Sedai for backup*

*realizes that might be conter-productive...*

I probably should be slightly more respectful of another sister's warder, but you touched a subject close to my heart. Therefore I apologise to Cary but not to you :D

Cary Sedai
07-29-2013, 05:14 PM
*considers calling Aes Sedai for backup*

*realizes that might be conter-productive...*

*flicks the ears of all who have been mean to my Warder*

I do like the witch ones, actually I think I've liked any and all that I have read! :)

Cary Sedai
07-29-2013, 05:21 PM
BTW,

Sorry it took me so long Sare. You see, there are these two little ones taking most of my attention. At the time you called for help I was nursing Artemis and reading to Athena. Neither was willing to let me use just one hand to post with my phone. Then there was a poo explosion, and then AJ wanted to nap. They both fell asleep, so I napped with them. Then we had to eat and more nursing for T. Then taking AJ for a wee (potty training).... you get the idea! I'm typing one handed now... :D

Nazbaque
07-29-2013, 08:00 PM
Have you read any of his non-DW books?

The Bromeliad Trilogy (a.k.a. Nomes Trilogy i.e. Truckers, Diggers and Wings) is well worth a read.

The Carpet People is rather unique among Pratchett's books as he originally wrote it at age seventeen and then rewrote it after the DW series gained the huge fanbase that started pestering him about this book listed among other titles by this author. "Not exactly the book he wrote then and not exactly a book he would write now" cowritten with his younger self with the additional bonus of not having to pay any royalties to the young upstart.

Strata is something like the DW books but parodising scifi instead of fantasy.

Nation, Good Omens and the others are all on my list but alas I haven't yet been in the right frame of mind to get into them

And BTW

SIS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

How have you been?

Sarevok
07-30-2013, 06:30 AM
I do like the witch ones, actually I think I've liked any and all that I have read! :)

See? Conterproductive... :(

Figbiscuit
07-30-2013, 09:17 AM
I will happily accept flicked ears from Cary just to have her here to say hello to. HI CARY!! No sprinkling of fairy dust, or is that reserved for your two smalls only now?

Naz, I personally thought Nation was an excellent read, but I know a lot of hardcore DW fans didn't like it, mostly because it wasn't DW. You can be *too* close-minded about these things I think tho... I freely admit I've never read a Pratchett work I didn't enjoy, which just goes to prove his brilliance even further :cool:

Good Omens was one of the first of his I ever read, must be at least 15 years ago now, and is still one of my favourites to this day. It's definitely a very British book. I've always intended to read more Neil Gaiman since but never really got round to it.

I own the Bromeliad Trilogy, Strata, Dark Side of the Sun, The Carpet People (sadly only the new version, the old one goes for about 400 on ebay :eek:), I've got three of the science books, Nation, all 4 Mappes, The Last Hero in large illustrated version and The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents. Oh, and the old version of the Discworld Companion. The only books I don't have at the moment which I want are the Jonny trilogy (I used to have Only You Can Save Mankind, which I loved as a teenager), and The Unadultarated Cat (I have no idea what it is but I want it for the name alone).

Nei
08-01-2013, 11:13 PM
Have you read any of his non-DW books?

I've only read Good Omens, but I'm looking at Dodger.

Figbiscuit
08-20-2013, 05:59 AM
I forgot about Dodger. That's a good tale, especially if you have any interest in London during the period set, but for me I enjoyed Nation more. It retained just enough fantasy for me.

The other one I enjoyed recently was The Long Earth. I liked the concept and thought it was interestingly developed. I bought The Long War (the second in the trilogy) just before I moved house a few weeks ago so very looking forward to digging into that when I get some time!

Uno
08-21-2013, 12:38 PM
I love all Discworld books, except for the witches. They're just annoying. :(

How can you not like the witch books? They've got Nanny Ogg, one of the funniest characters in the entire Discworld series.

"Nanny Ogg usually went to bed early. After all, she was an old lady. Sometimes she went to bed as early as 6 a.m." --Maskerade.

And they've got Greebo.

GonzoTheGreat
08-21-2013, 01:08 PM
And Morris Dancers.

Uno
08-24-2013, 06:50 PM
And Morris Dancers.

True. And Casanunda, o'course.


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