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View Full Version : whaddddya want in a home?


SauceyBlueConfetti
06-18-2014, 10:14 AM
Ok, we are biting the bullet and putting our house up for sale. We don't want to miss this swing in the market where we can get a reasonable amount for our house, but buy a SUPER FANTASTIC house for a fairly low cost. Michigan had a number of foreclosures in the last 5 years, so some pretty great houses are available for cheap cheap cheap.


What would you want in your "perfect" home? I am just curious as my hubby and I have different wish lists.

Isabel
06-18-2014, 10:23 AM
A bath and dishwasher:)

GonzoTheGreat
06-18-2014, 11:30 AM
Good view of the sky, no light pollution at all.
Oh, and a reasonably sized town/city within cycling distance, for getting groceries and other shopping and such.

Having running water only where you want it is a definite plus.

fdsaf3
06-18-2014, 12:02 PM
These are wants and not needs, right?

3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms (one full, one half is fine).

Good sized master bedroom with a walk-in closet (GF has a LOT of clothes). Scenic views and and a walk-out/private balcony would be preferred.

En suite bathroom would be good sized with a big shower (I'm 6'4"). Two sinks or a sink outside the bathroom proper to facilitate both of us getting ready in the morning would be good.

The other two bedrooms can just be normal bedrooms. No special amenities needed for those.

Um. Assuming it's a split-level, hardwood floors in the main floor. Definitely no carpet in the bathroom. I'm not big on carpet in general, so I'd almost prefer hardwood floor throughout. That's not as common outside where I live (Minneapolis), but whatever.

I'm not picky about the kitchen. Some people prefer an open floor plan, but I'm not as into that as others are. I don't host a ton of social gatherings, and when we do we always find a way to make it work. I think designing a house around the possibility of hosting social events is dumb unless you know for a fact you'll be hosting all the time. I'd rather it be functional for everyday living and adaptable to social situations when they arise. New-ish appliances, or at least ones which are in good shape. Just a kitchen which has been well maintained is good enough. Like I said, I'm not picky.

Central air is a must for me, as is a dishwasher and washer/dryer. I'd like a finished basement (again, assuming it has one) or a nice sized main room to put the entertainment center (couch, TV, etc.).

That's...about it. I'm planning on buying a house for the first time in the next six months, and I think I need to get a *lot* more picky.

Edit:

So, my personal must-have list:

* big main bedroom
* large en suite bathroom with large shower
* Central air, washer, dryer, dishwasher
* Separate office space / computer room (not mentioned above; this just occurred to me)
* 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms

Very strongly preferred list:

* Private balcony/walkout from master bedroom
* View of something: lakefront, etc.
* Hardwood flooring throughout (at least throughout main level)
* Absolutely no carpet in the bathroom

SauceyBlueConfetti
06-18-2014, 01:17 PM
fdsaf3,

your list pretty much mimics mine, seriously almost identical. I want 4 bedrooms though...if we can find it. Those go pretty fast, especially in the "move in ready" condition I want for the rest of the house.

Right now we have an itty bitty kitchen, but top of the line all new appliances, so I am being picky. I want a bigger kitchen, but I want it already upgraded. Not going to downgrade on the appliances. Wood floors are a must, we updated ours a few years ago and I would never go back to carpet.

Walk in closet. Walk in closet. Walk in closet.

Sarevok
06-18-2014, 01:30 PM
Hehe, my standards wouldn't really fit you, I think.
Currently live on 30m2 (322 sq.ft.) and that's plenty for me, for now. :)

Khoram
06-18-2014, 01:42 PM
Who puts carpet in a bathroom? That's just asking for mold and mildew.

Davian93
06-18-2014, 01:49 PM
Who puts carpet in a bathroom? That's just asking for mold and mildew.

Dumb Americans...I cant tell you how many homes I saw that in when I was househunting 4 years ago.

So freaking stupid too...and utterly disgusting.


For me, things I would want in my next home:

3 Bed, 2 Bath
A large master bedroom regardless of how small the other 2 bedrooms are. My current master is too small and we dont have walk-in closets which annoys the hell out of me. I want a Master that I can throw a small couch/seating area in so we can just relax in there on lazy saturday mornings.

Something in a real neighborhood as I'm sick of living in the rural suburbs. Something within easy walking distance of civilization and so we can walk our dogs easily.

Updated appliances are nice but honestly I could care less...I'd rather have cheap crappy (albeit working) appliances that I can legitimately replace rather than brand new ones that I dont like (like the house I bought 4 years ago) as I cant easily replace them as they dont "need" it and the value/money isnt there for it.

Hardwood floors are great on a main level but I'd hate them in an upstairs area. Hardwood floors mean constant sweeping and there is upkeep to think about, especially with pets. A good solid berber carpet upstairs would make me happy.

Must have is a 2 car garage...cant park outside in winter in VT. I will never willingly go back to not having a garage.

I will never willingly live on a "private" road again either as I'm sick of paying for and dealing with a plow service.

Nazbaque
06-18-2014, 01:52 PM
Hehe, my standards wouldn't really fit you, I think.
Currently live on 30m2 (322 sq.ft.) and that's plenty for me, for now. :)

I manage quite well in my 18 square meter appartment. Well it could be cleaner I suppose. It's the room inside my head I'm worried about. Oh and my hard drive.

Sodas
06-18-2014, 10:40 PM
Ok, we are biting the bullet and putting our house up for sale. We don't want to miss this swing in the market where we can get a reasonable amount for our house, but buy a SUPER FANTASTIC house for a fairly low cost. Michigan had a number of foreclosures in the last 5 years, so some pretty great houses are available for cheap cheap cheap.

Just be careful. The reason so much of it is so inexpensive is because where it is. There is high crime, lack of police and maintenance, as well as other issues.

I know the Detriot area well enough, having lived in Auburn Hills and Roseville in 07. My wife's family is from the Pontiac area just north of the old Silverdome. Most of my wife's brother's now own homes in and around Detriot (such as in Ferndale). It's pretty dangerous and the schools are terrible, not to mention the parks are lousy and roads have been torn back up.

If you buy a home in Michigan, you should look upstate. Lapeer is a pretty nice area. Lots of apple orchards out there with great apple cider!

Ann Arbor, to the center of the state, is ok, if you want a college town atmosphere. Lots of little shops and foodie places. Just don't expect to be able to get around on Saturdays in the fall.

What would you want in your "perfect" home? I am just curious as my hubby and I have different wish lists.

What you can have and what you may want to have - don't always coincide. First step is to understand the laws/ordinances of where you are building/buying.

Location, location, location - it can't be said enough.

Mort
06-19-2014, 04:45 AM
We don't want to miss this swing in the market where we can get a reasonable amount for our house, but buy a SUPER FANTASTIC house for a fairly low cost. Michigan had a number of foreclosures in the last 5 years, so some pretty great houses are available for cheap cheap cheap.


How big a bullet are we talking about?

Want: All the bells and whistles in the known world please! I'm single so I'm not actually into a house anytime soon. But if I needed one I would want the bedrooms for all living there and 1-2 extra rooms for office and playroom (think extra movie room or hobby shop).

Would be nice to have just a bit of property as well. Not really into the whole gated community type of deals where you have a neighbor 20 feet in every direction :)
How am I supposed to play loud music and have one of those epic sexy parties otherwise? Unless the neighbors are cool with that, but they rarely are... party poopers. :(

yks 6nnetu hing
06-19-2014, 06:53 AM
*sigh*

we've been trying to move for over a year now. Dai's aunt left him and his brother her house; so Dai and I were planning on buying his brother out.

The house is wonderful: built in the 1930s, lots of lovely Original details, including bay windows and a small balcony... has a small front garden and a sizable (for Dutch standards) back garden, Living/dining room and kitchen on the ground floor, 4 rooms of varying sizes which we thought to convert into 2 bedrooms, a hobby-room and bathroom on the 1st floor and potential for 3 more rooms on the attic. Oh, and it's outside of Amsterdam, but there's a train station and with the train we'll be in Amsterdam central station in 15 min (which is faster than it takes now with the public transport) or at the beach in 15 min.

however, the house hasn't been renovated since the 70s. so, in order of urgency we need to: paint all the wooden details on the outside, change all the windows for double-glazed ones, repair the chimney, check/repair the roof for leaks, change the entire electricity network, replace a beam under the floor, replace a ceiling in one of the rooms (there's water damage), replace the dormer in the attic, repair the front door, install a bathroom - this includes minor rearranging of the plumbing-, install a new kitchen, get rid of the fugly 70s puke-green tiling on pretty much all the walls in all the hallways and re-finish all the walls... and ceilings. Replace all the flooring in all the rooms, re-paint everything. And, maybe, if there's time and/or energy left, re-do the gardens.

Almost none of which we can do before we get our Amsterdam appartment sold. grrrr.

Sodas
06-19-2014, 07:26 AM
*sigh*

we've been trying to move for over a year now. Dai's aunt left him and his brother her house; so Dai and I were planning on buying his brother out.

The house is wonderful: built in the 1930s, lots of lovely Original details, including bay windows and a small balcony... has a small front garden and a sizable (for Dutch standards) back garden, Living/dining room and kitchen on the ground floor, 4 rooms of varying sizes which we thought to convert into 2 bedrooms, a hobby-room and bathroom on the 1st floor and potential for 3 more rooms on the attic. Oh, and it's outside of Amsterdam, but there's a train station and with the train we'll be in Amsterdam central station in 15 min (which is faster than it takes now with the public transport) or at the beach in 15 min.

however, the house hasn't been renovated since the 70s. so, in order of urgency we need to: paint all the wooden details on the outside, change all the windows for double-glazed ones, repair the chimney, check/repair the roof for leaks, change the entire electricity network, replace a beam under the floor, replace a ceiling in one of the rooms (there's water damage), replace the dormer in the attic, repair the front door, install a bathroom - this includes minor rearranging of the plumbing-, install a new kitchen, get rid of the fugly 70s puke-green tiling on pretty much all the walls in all the hallways and re-finish all the walls... and ceilings. Replace all the flooring in all the rooms, re-paint everything. And, maybe, if there's time and/or energy left, re-do the gardens.

Almost none of which we can do before we get our Amsterdam appartment sold. grrrr.

Wow, sounds like a big choice.

I'd say the house, since it has property attached, would be worthwhile to upgrade. Generally, a complete renovation will cost you more than tearing the whole thing down and starting from scratch. In fact, you could even buy a panel based kit house (see SIPs) that takes 2-3 days to put together for roughly 20-40 grand US depending on size (you'll have to convert that to Euro's). Then you just need to install electricals, plumbing, most sub-contract work. Most are already pre-sized to handle conventional windows/doors, which makes purchasing and fitting easy.

If I was in a similar situation I would consider myself blessed. I'd reno or replace the house while living in the apartment. Once done, then I'd sell the apartment.

Btw, Amsterdam!! I really want to visit soon. I hear so many great things, including about new Architectural innovations in Urban Planning/Climate Change Adaptation. I would love to meet up and talk Netherlands/Denmark, WoT, Climate Science, Architecture and more.

yks 6nnetu hing
06-19-2014, 07:43 AM
Wow, sounds like a big choice.

I'd say the house, since it has property attached, would be worthwhile to upgrade. Generally, a complete renovation will cost you more than tearing the whole thing down and starting from scratch. In fact, you could even buy a panel based kit house (see SIPs) that takes 2-3 days to put together for roughly 20-40 grand US depending on size (you'll have to convert that to Euro's). Then you just need to install electricals, plumbing, most sub-contract work. Most are already pre-sized to handle conventional windows/doors, which makes purchasing and fitting easy.

If I was in a similar situation I would consider myself blessed. I'd reno or replace the house while living in the apartment. Once done, then I'd sell the apartment.

Btw, Amsterdam!! I really want to visit soon. I hear so many great things, including about new Architectural innovations in Urban Planning/Climate Change Adaptation. I would love to meet up and talk Denmark, WoT, Climate Science, Architecture and more. I also most likely had family that lived in Denmark before moving to the states, so I'm interested in seeing the sites/graves. I've been to Europe before, multiple times, but never Denmark.

*looks at Sodas in horror for even suggeting tearing down the house*

it's a row house, in a street with very similar looking houses, really lovely neighbourhood, there's no way we'd tear it down. no way ever!

unfortunately we're looking at costs which we won't be able to finance without taking an additional loan for all the necessary works on the house, which we CAN do, and were actually planning to do anyways; we just really want to change banks for the loan which means that first we need to close the current mortgage (=sell the apartment) and then enter into a new mortgage on new terms. Even if we do just the bare necessities on structural health/safety things, we're looking at about 50 k (euros, net) before we can even get to any of the finishings.

Oh well. Just save up and... probably no JordanCon next year (again :( )

Sodas
06-19-2014, 08:10 AM
*looks at Sodas in horror for even suggeting tearing down the house*

I know! It's hard. I only suggest it because it can be the best option. Being energy inefficient will make you vulnerable to climate change.

That's not to say the row house couldn't be adapted or improved upon. If the home is built out of a heavy thermal mass, such as brick, it could be used, and if the houses face south (since you are in the Northern Hemisphere).

It just depends on many key factors.

Luckily, you also live in a country at the fore-front of climate change adaptation. Not to mention, a place that has a good amount of rainfall. That may seem insignificant, but as droughts have spread across the world now for the last 3 years, it's a serious advantage to have mass water reservoirs when countries are running out of water, like Yemen.

So I'd focus on energy efficiency in case of a long term power outage.

it's a row house, in a street with very similar looking houses, really lovely neighbourhood, there's no way we'd tear it down. no way ever!

Tearing down row houses is difficult because of collateral damage - which complicates things greatly.

unfortunately we're looking at costs which we won't be able to finance without taking an additional loan for all the necessary works on the house, which we CAN do, and were actually planning to do anyways; we just really want to change banks for the loan which means that first we need to close the current mortgage (=sell the apartment) and then enter into a new mortgage on new terms. Even if we do just the bare necessities on structural health/safety things, we're looking at about 50 k (euros, net) before we can even get to any of the finishings.

Oh well. Just save up and... probably no JordanCon next year (again :( )

Hmm. Then I'd suggest selling both. If the apartment is tying you down from investing in the new property, sell it, take the money from both, and buy yourself a property that you like better (maybe more turn-key).

yks 6nnetu hing
06-19-2014, 08:35 AM
So I'd focus on energy efficiency in case of a long term power outage. yes, that's the plan. Though, honestly, the Netherlands is one of the most energy-independent countries in the region; and the grid is very good. As you may be aware, we have a slightly opposite prblem to droughts. Most of Amsterdam is up to 3 m below sea level.

Tearing down row houses is difficult because of collateral damage - which complicates things greatly. seriously. This must be one of the biggest culture divisions between US and Europe. there will be absolutely no tearing down of old culturally protected buildings. At least, the facade must remain the same, says so in the law.



Hmm. Then I'd suggest selling both. If the apartment is tying you down from investing in the new property, sell it, take the money from both, and buy yourself a property that you like better (maybe more turn-key).er. Again, can't do that. Long story short, if Dai didn't already own half of this house ther's no way we'd ever* be able to afford anything in a similar area nor size.

On the up-side, we're keeping level with our bills so we're not in an enormous hurry. it's just frustrating, that's all. I keep telling myself: good things come to those who wait.



*I actually mean "in the next 20 years or so"

Sodas
06-19-2014, 09:06 AM
yes, that's the plan. Though, honestly, the Netherlands is one of the most energy-independent countries in the region; and the grid is very good. As you may be aware, we have a slightly opposite prblem to droughts. Most of Amsterdam is up to 3 m below sea level.

Absolutely. I've been watching New York city bring in experts from the Netherlands to help with adaptation. Having too much water is not a bad problem to have, all things considered. It's about understanding flooding. :D

seriously. This must be one of the biggest culture divisions between US and Europe. there will be absolutely no tearing down of old culturally protected buildings. At least, the facade must remain the same, says so in the law.

It happens in the US as well. We become attached to buildings that aren't energy efficient for some reason.

er. Again, can't do that. Long story short, if Dai didn't already own half of this house ther's no way we'd ever* be able to afford anything in a similar area nor size.

On the up-side, we're keeping level with our bills so we're not in an enormous hurry. it's just frustrating, that's all. I keep telling myself: good things come to those who wait.



*I actually mean "in the next 20 years or so"

Lol. Yes, well, it takes time and money to reno old buildings, particularly those with water damage. You have to think mold and mildew removal as well, on top of building permits. I saw the list, and I know it's going to be complicated.

I'm not saying give up, just think about it.

Dai owns half the house - so why not sell it instead of try to buy the rest of it, only to have to reno?

Yes, you may not be able to afford right now as big or as nice a place, but in 20 years, you may be able to afford twice the place with the money you save in utilities/reno/permit costs.

SauceyBlueConfetti
06-19-2014, 10:24 AM
Sodas I was born and raised in Waterford. I now live in Royal Oak so "knowing" an area isn't a problem. You think Ferndale is a bad area ? LOLOLOL. That is (and has been for a while) THE up and coming gay community where many houses are coveted right now. Too small for us though. Birmingham and Bloomfield are where we are looking.

Davian93
06-19-2014, 07:47 PM
seriously. This must be one of the biggest culture divisions between US and Europe. there will be absolutely no tearing down of old culturally protected buildings. At least, the facade must remain the same, says so in the law

We NEVER tear down "old" houses here...of course, the word "old" means something different to Americans compared to most Europeans.

That house sounds awesome and its definitely worth the work to fix it up...regardless of what Sodas says.

Sodas
06-19-2014, 09:04 PM
Sodas I was born and raised in Waterford. I now live in Royal Oak so "knowing" an area isn't a problem. You think Ferndale is a bad area ? LOLOLOL.

Not just I, my wife, who grew up in Pontiac, and her brother, who lives in Ferndale right now. So we know the area because we have family that lives there.

In fact, I'm the least of the detractors from the area. I worked 8 mile for a job I had and loved the people/places, but it's not safe. I would never call ferndale safe.

My wife would say no to anything near Detroit period. My brother in law would say think twice. Even if he lives in Ferndale, he commutes to Pontiac for work daily. Every day he says he worries about some crack head breaking in while he is gone. There is no work in the city, so he can't be close otherwise.

That is (and has been for a while) THE up and coming gay community where many houses are coveted right now.

Well, her brother isn't gay, not that it matters.

It's a nice area in appearance. I walked with him around the area and it's not nearly like Pontiac. However, it's still next to Detroit. He still hear's gun shots nightly.

Too small for us though. Birmingham and Bloomfield are where we are looking.

Both are indeed nicer areas. Troy isn't bad as well (kinda in the middle). You could look east, St. Clare, but it's expensive. My uncle-in-law owns a home/slip on the river there. Very nice area, little foreclosures.

That house sounds awesome and its definitely worth the work to fix it up...regardless of what Sodas says.

That bad Sodas! Erm, :D I'm not saying to do anything either way, just giving suggestions. They are just options so I know how you guys feel. If you feel so strongly, then that's fine. I'd never say these things must be done, rather just options of what could be done. Do what you feel is best.

If you see that it's worth it to fix it, then it's worth it to fix it. You are on the ground there. Do it. Don't mind me. I'm loaning you my Architectural experience. I'm just saying, be prepared to pay to fix it.

I want you guys to be happy. So long as you guys are happy with what you have, I'm happy. That's all :)

Oh, and grabbing a coffee together in Amsterdam one day.

eht slat meit
06-19-2014, 09:41 PM
I want caches and nooks, cubbies and alcoves,where a score of books will be secreted. There should be at least one high secular-themed stained glass window. Windows, yes, there should be a good many with easily dusted simple shelves where philters and faux gemstones and decorative colored crystal may be set to best catch the light on a sunny day or play back and forth on the scale of a frosty pane.


Secret passages are also a must and like that stained glass, at least one revolving bookcase that will lead through stone passages between the walls, lined with empty stone sconces that can safely hold torches within the fire code. (hey, this is my dream house, dammit) There will of course be what foolish people call a panic room by silly people and is quite the opposite, with pretty plants and running water that mimicks the sound of a waterfall.

Said house will require chests with false bottoms, old style writing secretaries for new style laptops, and any number of unfolding compartments that have their own puzzle key locks for security.

I'd consider an indoor pool, but ultimately say no to that, because you'd never be able to get rid of the visitors and such a house is meant to be enjoyed in privacy with a good book or even a trash thrills novel.

Good solid dishwasher and laundry utilities so that I can spend my time enjoying said house and not cleaning it.

The rest will probably gather dust.

Davian93
06-19-2014, 09:52 PM
I want caches and nooks, cubbies and alcoves,where a score of books will be secreted. There should be at least one high secular-themed stained glass window. Windows, yes, there should be a good many with easily dusted simple shelves where philters and faux gemstones and decorative colored crystal may be set to best catch the light on a sunny day or play back and forth on the scale of a frosty pane.

So a Craftsman home then...yeah, I love those too. Awesome details typically.

Sodas
06-19-2014, 11:13 PM
I want caches and nooks, cubbies and alcoves,where a score of books will be secreted. There should be at least one high secular-themed stained glass window. Windows, yes, there should be a good many with easily dusted simple shelves where philters and faux gemstones and decorative colored crystal may be set to best catch the light on a sunny day or play back and forth on the scale of a frosty pane.

Check this out.

http://youtu.be/GuBHOOAO_oc

Notice the glass/gemstones along the top of the windows. Plus the material, cob, allows for great amounts of storage/niches. You can even make a cob couch that will act as a lovely warm place to cozy up and read a book.

Earthships also love to use cut glass/plastic bottle walls to get a gemstone effect.

Brittany project : http://youtu.be/dHO7JjZFI0E
Brighton project : http://youtu.be/gIPRBQlpx2Y

Interior waterfall is also doable and can lead to a cistern.

Some Earthship concepts have interior water features, even fish ponds, such as the Phoenix model.
http://youtu.be/S65pVIA37do

Or you can just buy a waterfall..
http://youtu.be/h-dICMk5Zkk

These are just some unique options :)

eht slat meit
06-20-2014, 06:06 AM
The dreamer inside me is squeeee'ing softly! Some of the options I could do without, but over all that is pleasing to the mind's eye.

Figbiscuit
06-23-2014, 08:22 AM
I want caches and nooks, cubbies and alcoves,where a score of books will be secreted. There should be at least one high secular-themed stained glass window. Windows, yes, there should be a good many with easily dusted simple shelves where philters and faux gemstones and decorative colored crystal may be set to best catch the light on a sunny day or play back and forth on the scale of a frosty pane.


Secret passages are also a must and like that stained glass, at least one revolving bookcase that will lead through stone passages between the walls, lined with empty stone sconces that can safely hold torches within the fire code. (hey, this is my dream house, dammit) There will of course be what foolish people call a panic room by silly people and is quite the opposite, with pretty plants and running water that mimicks the sound of a waterfall.

Said house will require chests with false bottoms, old style writing secretaries for new style laptops, and any number of unfolding compartments that have their own puzzle key locks for security.

I'd consider an indoor pool, but ultimately say no to that, because you'd never be able to get rid of the visitors and such a house is meant to be enjoyed in privacy with a good book or even a trash thrills novel.

Good solid dishwasher and laundry utilities so that I can spend my time enjoying said house and not cleaning it.

The rest will probably gather dust.

OK I want all of this now too please

On a more practical note, when we came to move, he wanted a garage, I wanted three bedrooms, a dining room and a space outside which caught the sun. Every house we looked at was built from that basic list.

We weren't too fussed about the interior finish - we are planning on living there until we are old and grey so there is plenty of time to make the house how we would like it. Having had one project house it is nice to be able to take our time over this one. Especially as every last penny we had went on the house and there isn't any left for extras at the moment, haha :rolleyes:

Location was more important to us in the end than property, we ended up getting extremely lucky with the house in many ways (and in others congratulating ourselves for making some sensible monetary decisions a few years ago), and I have been known to say on more than one occasion that I could live in a shoebox / caravan / wreck, as long as it was situated exactly where we are now :)

Can anyone advise me on how to bottle all the heat which is being generated by my conservatory at the moment in a rare period of continuously sunny weather, so I can save it for winter please?

GonzoTheGreat
06-23-2014, 09:04 AM
I'd consider an indoor pool, but ultimately say no to that, because you'd never be able to get rid of the visitors and such a house is meant to be enjoyed in privacy with a good book or even a trash thrills novel.
Wouldn't the sharks handle that? :confused:

Can anyone advise me on how to bottle all the heat which is being generated by my conservatory at the moment in a rare period of continuously sunny weather, so I can save it for winter please?
Grow chili peppers in it.

eht slat meit
06-23-2014, 05:20 PM
Can anyone advise me on how to bottle all the heat which is being generated by my conservatory at the moment in a rare period of continuously sunny weather, so I can save it for winter please?

I believe that requires a bowl, not a bottle!

SauceyBlueConfetti
07-08-2014, 10:52 AM
Yipes. We finally got the house on the market after lots of cleaning, cleaning out and organizing. We put it up for sale on Saturday and had 3 offers by Wednesday. We accepted a nice, high offer and are now waiting on the results of the inspection and the mortgage approval for the buyer to be finalized. We asked for 30 days from closing to vacate, which should get us to early September, because...


WE HAVE NOWHERE TO LIVE YET!!!! aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaah!!! Panic time. We don't want to rush buying a house, so we are looking at a townhouse rental tonight. Which oddly is bigger than our current home AND has a fireplace.

But yeah. Panic. I have panicky dreams every night now. Lots of packing ahead! Keep your fingers crossed for me!!!

Isabel
07-08-2014, 11:45 AM
Awesome you sold your house so quick and with a good bid! :)

Ishara
07-09-2014, 07:24 AM
I'm really happy it got sold so quickly, Saucy. And good luck with the packing. I'd be more stressed about packing than I would be about finding a new place. I LOATHE packing.

Figbiscuit
07-15-2014, 04:38 AM
Awesome news, you must be thrilled behind the blind panic :D

I loved the packing, the sorting out of things to discard, the making things fit prettily in boxes and then stacking said boxes, but then I also do jigsaws for a hobby... which being said, I wouldn't want to do it again any time soon.

We rented between selling and purchasing, which turned out to be an extremely good move and one I'm glad we made although it wasn't how we initially planned it. It was a pain to live out of boxes for six months with half our belongings in storage, but equally it gave us space and time to decide on exactly the right house, and also we saved considerably more money as our rental cost was less than we'd been paying on our mortgage. And we ended up in a much better place because of it.

I hope it continues to go well. Just don't rush into buying something you're not totally happy with for the sake of it. I don't know how it works in the US but we were in a much stronger position as a purchaser by not being in a chain, I assume it is the same. Take full advantage of that!

Tomp
07-15-2014, 01:03 PM
Take the opportunity to get rid of a lot of stuff you don't use/need.

A good rule of thumb that I used when I moved was to get rid of things you haven't used during the last three years. Of course excempting photos and other important memory items as well as some things which you can find a GOOD reason to keep.

Davian93
07-15-2014, 01:13 PM
Take the opportunity to get rid of a lot of stuff you don't use/need.

A good rule of thumb that I used when I moved was to get rid of things you haven't used during the last three years. Of course excempting photos and other important memory items as well as some things which you can find a GOOD reason to keep.

THIS...100% this. I did this the last 2 times I moved and I did not regret it at all. It really helps clear out the clutter.

Gilshalos Sedai
07-16-2014, 10:16 AM
Congrats on the quick sale, SBC! Bryan and I dread selling our house. Though we know the time is coming.

SauceyBlueConfetti
07-16-2014, 11:27 AM
still panicking!


We purged a ton of stuff just getting ready to put the house on the market, and I think that was the key to the quick sale---the house looked great. Also, 90% of the "purge" was not mine. We have a hereditary pack rat problem in our (ahem, my husband's) family that was addressed pretty well in the last month. I think I offended both my mom and his when I told them both "not ONE MORE PIECE OF JUNK is coming to our house". They tend to give us something, anything almost every time we see them. The word junk was harsh, but necessary. : ) Gosh I can be a bitch. lololol

Waiting on the results of the final appraisal for the buyers mortgage to be finalized. We have a condo on hold for a temporary move until we find the house we want. Now it just a waiting game.

Oh and my rule, for many many years has been if a bag/object/thing comes IN the house, something has to go OUT either to the garbage, Purple Heart donation or recycle to a friend/family. It is a great rule.

Sarevok
07-16-2014, 03:06 PM
Congrats on the quick sale, SBC! Bryan and I dread selling our house. Though we know the time is coming.

Oh man... I remember when you guys BOUGHT your house. Now I feel old. :(

SauceyBlueConfetti
08-01-2014, 03:11 PM
Ok, we are in the home stretch. Get it? Home stretch?

The closing on the sale of our house is Monday!! We have a condo near my parents lined up that is actually a decent size and a good area to rent for 9-12 months while we house hunt.

Now the FUN stuff begins! Well, no actually, the packing and moving is next, THEN the fun stuff of looking for a house or having one built. Yay!


My husband suggested we rent for a year or so and then plan a move to Colorado, which is where we both want to end up eventually anyway. So that is now playing havoc in my head.

Khoram
08-01-2014, 08:30 PM
But... but then you won't be Detroit anymore. You'll be... whichever city you end up moving to. And who wants to be associated with Colorado? :rolleyes:

Sei'taer
08-01-2014, 11:02 PM
Here: http://www.homes.com/property/747-bradley-cove-collierville-tn-38017/id-600034997559/

Guess what we're doing?

SauceyBlueConfetti
08-02-2014, 09:15 AM
Awesome. Hope your situation goes as fast as mine! I remember Alyson saying you were looking!!!

Isabel
08-02-2014, 12:49 PM
Awesome :) :):) :) Looks like a beautifull house!

Figbiscuit
08-04-2014, 10:20 AM
But... but then you won't be Detroit anymore. You'll be... whichever city you end up moving to. And who wants to be associated with Colorado? :rolleyes:

Saucey will ALWAYS be Detroit

Khoram
08-04-2014, 10:34 AM
Saucey will ALWAYS be Detroit

So you can take the girl out of Detroit, but not Detroit out of the girl?

GonzoTheGreat
08-04-2014, 11:13 AM
Detroit. Because everyone needs a place to come from.

Kimon
08-04-2014, 11:41 AM
Detroit. Because everyone needs a place to come from.

Detroit has a pretty negative reputation, somewhat deservedly, but the suburbs are actually quite nice. I grew up in the suburbs north of Detroit myself, and most of my family still lives there.

Cor Shan
08-04-2014, 05:48 PM
As a Canadian, I find Colorado pretty reasonable sounding. Mostly for skiing.

Davian93
08-04-2014, 06:41 PM
As a Canadian, I find Colorado pretty reasonable sounding. Mostly for skiing.

Boulder is really nice...Colorado Springs is an area I'd be afraid to even enter, let alone live in given how freaky rightwing it is.

I had a job offer out in Denver about 10 years ago now and I sometimes wonder how my life would have been had I simply taken it. It was a decent offer but they tried to lowball me on salary and I wouldn't budge.

Khoram
08-04-2014, 10:50 PM
As a Canadian, I find Colorado pretty reasonable sounding. Mostly for skiing.

As a Quebecois, I find it awful. Cause, you know, the whole Nordiques thing. And Patrick Roy.




Who am I kidding? I'm not really Quebecois; I'm not fully French. :rolleyes:

Figbiscuit
08-05-2014, 07:28 AM
So you can take the girl out of Detroit, but not Detroit out of the girl?

That's how it works, yep

As a Canadian, I find Colorado pretty reasonable sounding. Mostly for snowboarding.

Fixed it for you :)

On an unrelated note we were looking at booking our boarding holiday at the weekend. My OH has decided it'd be worth the 6000 it'd cost us to go to Colerado just so he can board in a cowboy hat...(I mean, we're not, we're going to Andorra, and obvs we always wear helmets on the mountain anyway, but still...he has a point)

Gilshalos Sedai
08-05-2014, 11:28 AM
Empirically? What I want in a home? Hardwood or tile floors. A large back porch. North/south facing. Large kitchen indoors with a butler's pantry between it and the dining room. Outdoor kitchen with a grill that's inaccessible by small mammals. 4 bedrooms with at least two walk-in closets. Two linen closets, one on each floor. A stairwell with one landing, not two.

(Brought to you by flaws in Gil's current house.)

Davian93
08-05-2014, 12:30 PM
Empirically? What I want in a home? Hardwood or tile floors. A large back porch. North/south facing. Large kitchen indoors with a butler's pantry between it and the dining room. Outdoor kitchen with a grill that's inaccessible by small mammals. 4 bedrooms with at least two walk-in closets. Two linen closets, one on each floor. A stairwell with one landing, not two.

(Brought to you by flaws in Gil's current house.)

As someone who has hardwood floors, I will say that they are overrated...especially with your big dogs (do you still have big dogs?)

I like mine but the upkeep can get annoying and they pretty much always need to be mopped/swept. I've very happy I have carpeting on my second floor though.

I'd kill for a linen closet too...my house used to have one but the previous, previous owners put in a new double sided fireplace and that forced them to remove it on the 2nd level when they were running the new chimney...finding a place for towels and extra linens is quite annoying.

Gilshalos Sedai
08-05-2014, 12:46 PM
As someone who has hardwood floors, I will say that they are overrated...especially with your big dogs (do you still have big dogs?)

I like mine but the upkeep can get annoying and they pretty much always need to be mopped/swept. I've very happy I have carpeting on my second floor though.

I'd kill for a linen closet too...my house used to have one but the previous, previous owners put in a new double sided fireplace and that forced them to remove it on the 2nd level when they were running the new chimney...finding a place for towels and extra linens is quite annoying.

I have SERIOUS allergies the carpeting makes it that much worse. Plus... the dogs are always throwing up... among other things... on the carpets. And carpets, once you've lost power for several days after a hurricane in 85-100% humidity start to mildew. Quickly. And I want pre-distressed and/or bamboo hardwood. Believe me, we've looked into it.

Also, we found ceramic tile that is made to mimic the look of wood. We are now saving up for it.

~looks at thread...~ When the FUCK did we grow up?

Hugh the Hand
08-05-2014, 01:02 PM
Speak for yourself, I am 13.

Gilshalos Sedai
08-05-2014, 01:03 PM
Of course you are.

Davian93
08-05-2014, 02:07 PM
I have SERIOUS allergies the carpeting makes it that much worse. Plus... the dogs are always throwing up... among other things... on the carpets. And carpets, once you've lost power for several days after a hurricane in 85-100% humidity start to mildew. Quickly. And I want pre-distressed and/or bamboo hardwood. Believe me, we've looked into it.

Also, we found ceramic tile that is made to mimic the look of wood. We are now saving up for it.

~looks at thread...~ When the FUCK did we grow up?

That all makes sense. I'd personally get the tile over hard wood...if only for lack of maintenance. But hard wood floors are nice to look at...and far esaier to clean than carpet when it comes to dogs.

Gilshalos Sedai
08-05-2014, 02:14 PM
I cannot describe how awesome a pre-distressed hardwood bamboo floor would be.

Sigh.

It would also require us to win the lottery.

Cor Shan
08-05-2014, 08:14 PM
I wish I had exactly zero carpet in my suite. Probably because I hate vacuuming and would much rather mop/sweep. Since I don't have pets, I quite enjoy the hardwood. Or fake hardwood. I don't really care.

SauceyBlueConfetti
08-15-2014, 11:10 AM
So paperwork was done and ready for a closing on 8/15. Today. But because all was done, and the buyer wanted to get her residency in/done for her son's school, they asked to close early...8/4. Which we did. Yahooooo! We took 30 days to "rent" so we could move out more leisurely, but had anticipated 8/18 to be totally out of the house.

THANK THE GOOD GRACES OF THE UNIVERSE WE CLOSED EARLY. This past week we had major flooding in our area...called a 100 year storm. They said it was the equivalent of 6 days of 24 hours of solid rain packed into a 4 hour span.

The rainwater drains had to emergency release...and the sewers and rain water draining backed up into all the home in our neighborhood.

Good news...most of our stuff was already boxed and out of the basement. Bad news, the furniture was still down there. Worse news, 13 inches of water. Even worse news...insurance does not cover sewer backups/acts of god. soooooo no money to us for loss of personal belongings.

Good news (for us) the new homeowner is responsible for any structural damage etc. Her insurance will cover part of it. Mainly stuff like the furnace/air conditioner motor is dead, the washer/dryer/humidifier, bar fridge etc all need replacing and she will get some money for repairs of the wooden framing (finished basement)

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH!!!!!! Can you feel my stress level right now? CAN YOU FEEL IT?????

We immediately followed the cleaning advice using bio cleaning agents and bleach. And again, and again, so I am confident the place is going to be ok. Which we did not really have to do, cuz, you know, we don't own it anymore, but I could not have lived with myself without doing SOMETHING.

I did lose lots of clothes that had not been packed yet...the fancy stuff which was kept in wardrobes down there, some winter clothes in boxes, and my ::whimper:: wedding dress. Hoping to get that restored. Estimates are over $400 for that though, so I have it hanging and may just cut it at the bodice. ::whimper::

I lost ONE small box of family photos...could have been worse, but I had already packed and stored others. I lost a BIG box of books, mostly American and world lit stuff.

But it could have been worse.

Lesson: check your insurance to see if a sewer rider is required. Regular rainwater could have been less of a catastrophe, easier restoration and lower costs. Sewage = throw it all away.

SauceyBlueConfetti
08-15-2014, 11:14 AM
This is about 3 blocks from my house...


Flood story/pics (http://www.myfoxdetroit.com/story/26260168/dive-teams-at-i-75-and-i-696-after-severe-flooding)

They had to send dive teams in to the water to see if anyone was trapped and drowned in their cars. Luckily no one did. Final estimates were over 100 cars were in that 3 mile stretch, totally submerged. That is an underpass with a clearing of over 14 feet...the water was just skimming the overpass.

Davian93
08-15-2014, 11:18 AM
That really sucks, Saucy. Its tough to lose stuff with that level of sentimental value like a wedding dress.

And books of course. That would be the worst for me.

Khoram
08-15-2014, 12:03 PM
That really sucks, Saucy. Its tough to lose stuff with that level of sentimental value like a wedding dress.

And books of course. That would be the worst for me.

I guess your wedding dress isn't your most prized possession, huh Dav? :rolleyes:

Gilshalos Sedai
08-15-2014, 03:28 PM
Ugh, SBC, that really sucks. What's the dress made of? Maybe there's something that can be done/remade?