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Gilshalos Sedai
09-19-2008, 12:19 PM
ass and go vote this year, people. No matter your party/candidate/ideology. Remember what was sacrificed so you can go stand in a booth and have a say in your government.


WHY WOMEN SHOULD VOTE.

This is the story of our Grandmothers and Great-grandmothers; they lived only 90 years ago. (http://www.womensenews.org/article.cfm/dyn/aid/2048/context/ourstory)

Run Date: 10/29/04
By Louise Bernikow
WeNews historian
November 14, 1917: "Night of Terror" So Women Can Vote


(WOMENSENEWS)--American women's patriotic duty in wartime is to be silent about everything except support for the troops and the Commander in Chief. That was the general idea in 1917.

As Woodrow Wilson took office in January, demonstrators took up positions outside the White House, holding round-the-clock vigils demanding the vote for women. In spite of the on-going world war, they refused to step aside or muffle their demands.

Instead, Alice Paul, Lucy Burns and other members of the National Woman's Party aimed to humiliate the president and expose the hypocrisy of "making the world safe for democracy" when there was none at home. Their banners said, "Mr. President, how long must women wait for liberty." They hung Wilson in effigy and burned copies of his speeches.

Arrests began in June. "Obstructing traffic" was the usual charge, but many prison officials--as well as citizens--considered the suffragists traitors. In the Occoquan Workhouse in Virginia, they ate rancid food; were denied medical care and refused visitors. The demonstrators applied for political prisoner status. It was denied.

But the government's tactic didn't work. On release from prison, women returned to the White House gates. Their ranks swelled. By November, there were more marches and more arrests. An investigation had been launched into conditions at Occoquan and the activities of its superintendent, W.H. Whittaker, whose special cruelty was well known.

Whittaker and his workhouse guards greeted 33 returning protestors on what has become known as the infamous "Night of Terror," November 14, 1917. Forty-four club-wielding men beat, kicked, dragged and choked their charges, which included at least one 73-year-old woman. Women were lifted into the air and flung to the ground. One was stabbed between the eyes with the broken staff of her banner. Lucy Burns was handcuffed to the bars of her cell in a torturous position. Women were dragged by guards twisting their arms and hurled into concrete "punishment cells."

For all the pain, this brutal night may have turned the tide. Less than two weeks later, a court-ordered hearing exposed the beaten women to the world and the judge agreed they had been terrorized for nothing more than exercising their constitutional right to protest. It would take three more years to win the vote, but the courageous women of 1917 had won a new definition of female patriotism.

Louise Bernikow is the author of seven books and numerous magazine articles. She travels to campuses and community groups with a lecture and slide show about activism called "The Shoulders We Stand On: Women as Agents of Change." She can be reached at weezieman@aol.com.


This doesn't even address the unfairness of the Jim Crow Laws. (http://www.jimcrowhistory.org/history/resisting2.htm) (Sorry, this particular essay is REALLY long.)

Hopper
09-19-2008, 01:59 PM
And in addition to the groups that Gil mentioned, there were a few caucasion gentlemen of European decent that arranged for a little Revolution to give us the right to vote.

So to agree with Gil, get your butt to a polling place or arrange to vote absentee. . . . . . even if you're not going to vote the Tanaaw/Hopper ticket although I can't imagine why you wouldn't

Gilshalos Sedai
09-19-2008, 02:00 PM
Well, Hopper, they arranged for YOU to get the right to vote. Not me. ;)

Uno
09-19-2008, 08:51 PM
Well, Hopper, they arranged for YOU to get the right to vote. Not me. ;)

What in God's name are you two talking about? Granted, there were property requirements for voting in the colonial era, but they weren't that high, and at any rate persisted in many states for decades into the early republican period. Voting rights just weren't an important Revolutionary question to speak of, except to the extent that certain women at the time opined that they should have full political rights. They didn't get them

Gilshalos Sedai
09-20-2008, 08:50 AM
Exactly.

The Immortal One
09-21-2008, 12:54 AM
Strange... it's law that you HAVE to vote here in Australia. As long as you are an Australian citizen you must vote - even if you're not in the country.

It's usually a damn annoyance - both to remember to go, and to be bothered to 'get of my ass'.

Of course that doesn't mean you actually have to vote for someone; you can write 'Darth Vader' on the bottom of the ballot paper and give him a vote if you wish (technically it's illegal - but they can't prove it due to privacy laws).



On a side note, Darth Vader has been arrested:
http://news.ninemsn.com.au/article.aspx?id=562476Drunk 'Darth Vader' punished for Jedi attack

A booze-fuelled Briton pretending to be Star Wars villain Darth Vader has been punished for a bizarre surprise attack on two Jedi fanatics.

Arwel Wynne Hughes, 27 who has a chronic alcohol problem donned a black bin bag for a cape and used a metal crutch for a lightsabre when he impersonated the Dark Lord of the Sith on March 25.

He then lept over the wall of a "Jedi Church" where Barney Jones and his cousin Michael were duelling with lightsabres while filming a documentary.

The fans of the Star Wars films established the "church" last year in Holyhead, northwest Wales.

Hughes hollered "Darth Vader" as he swung his crutch about, whacking Barney Jones over the head with it and punching Michael Jones in the thigh.

The Jedi are guardians of peace and justice, and the force was with them at Holyhead Magistrates' Court as district judge Andrew Shaw punished "Darth Vader" with a two-month suspended jail sentence and a $220 fine.

Hughes got off lightly compared to the film version of Vader who had a hand chopped off by his son Luke Skywalker and was finished off by bolts of Force lightning from the evil Emperor Palpatine.

Hughes, who has previous convictions for assault, had drunk the best part of a 10-litre box of wine and could not remember the attack, his lawyer Frances Jones told the court.

DeiwosTheSkyGod
09-21-2008, 12:12 PM
What happens if you don't vote?

Ishara
09-21-2008, 08:20 PM
I love it. I wish that Canada would enforce voting that way. People forget what a damn priviledge it is to be able to vote.

Davian93
09-21-2008, 09:16 PM
I love it. I wish that Canada would enforce voting that way. People forget what a damn priviledge it is to be able to vote.

Forced voting is a bad thing...its a PRIVILEGE for a reason...not a requirement.

DeiwosTheSkyGod
09-21-2008, 09:25 PM
Well, it might force people to become more informed. But then again, it might just mean a ton of people casting votes based on whim...

Davian93
09-21-2008, 09:28 PM
Well, it might force people to become more informed. But then again, it might just mean a ton of people casting votes based on whim...

Likely the latter.

Ishara
09-21-2008, 10:11 PM
Predictably, I disagree. ;)

We all have the right to vote because of hard fought battles of some people who never actually got to see the fruits of their labours.

I am a minority and a woman, and while that's not the reason that I vote, it does make me deeply grateful to be able to exercise that right. The ability to cast a vote is a privilige and a responsibility. It is your civic duty. Period. If you don't vote I don't see why you should be able to access the things that come of it - maybe employment insurance, free health care, child care etc. Why should you benefit from something you choose to ignore?

People who don't vote, well it's more than the fact that they lose their right to complain about the results. I don't understand why people wouldn't avail themselves of the opportunity to make a difference, to make their voice heard.

Gilshalos Sedai
09-21-2008, 10:13 PM
Oh, c'mon, no comments on the Darth Vader impersonator? Or a Church of Jedi?

Davian93
09-21-2008, 10:15 PM
Predictably, I disagree. ;)

We all have the right to vote because of hard fought battles of some people who never actually got to see the fruits of their labours.

I am a minority and a woman, and while that's not the reason that I vote, it does make me deeply grateful to be able to exercise that right. The ability to cast a vote is a privilige and a responsibility. It is your civic duty. Period. If you don't vote I don't see why you should be able to access the things that come of it - maybe employment insurance, free health care, child care etc. Why should you benefit from something you choose to ignore?

People who don't vote, well it's more than the fact that they lose their right to complain about the results. I don't understand why people wouldn't avail themselves of the opportunity to make a difference, to make their voice heard.

Because they either dont care or stopped believeing in the system.

Personally, I think voting is something that should be earned but that is a very minority view. It would make for an electorate that cares about things but it would never happen...

Terez
09-21-2008, 10:20 PM
Well, it might force people to become more informed. But then again, it might just mean a ton of people casting votes based on whim...
Which is not all that different from the way things stand now...

GonzoTheGreat
09-22-2008, 05:20 AM
Oh, c'mon, no comments on the Darth Vader impersonator? Or a Church of Jedi?
The Jedi Church (whatever it's officially called) is the fault of the British census. They require the people to fill in a form every ten years or so, and one of the questions is for religion. Somewhere in the 1980s someone didn't like that, and filled in "Jedi". This led to a court case, and the judge decided that he couldn't prove it was not a religion, so it had to be accepted. Next time, a lot more filled that in, and some even started churches. I'm not sure anyone actually believes it (though that would not surprise me too much, religion being as inane as it is), but there sure are quite a lot of adherents (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/2757067.stm).

Gilshalos Sedai
09-22-2008, 09:20 AM
Well, I knew there was a Jedi church in Canada, just didn't know it was in Britain, too.



Go Vote.

Terez
09-22-2008, 09:25 AM
Have some more coffee, Gil. :D

Gilshalos Sedai
09-22-2008, 09:30 AM
Trying. The morning's young yet.

John Snow
09-22-2008, 10:55 AM
She was still around and kicking when I was in my early teens, and her daughter (my father's mother) did not like her at all so, (bearing in mind that my father's mother was a fussy, bigoted whiner whom I did not like at all) I thought she was pretty cool and would bike over to see her from time to time. She was married when she was 17 (for the first time), had minimal education and went to live in a one-room dirt-floor house in the Broad Ripple section of Indianapolis, which was the wilderness back then. Being an independent-minded sort, she eventually opened a bar in Broad Ripple, ran it for decades (including, of course, during the Prohibition), outlived 3 husbands and a number of lovers (but between husbands; she was proper about it). She did, however, have a black mark or three on her 'permanent record' which my grandmother felt was disgraceful - she'd been jailed (overnight) on three separate occasions. Can you guess what for, given her background?

Marching for the vote!

Gilshalos Sedai
09-22-2008, 10:59 AM
Sounds like someone I'd have liked to meet, Snow.

Hopper
09-22-2008, 11:22 AM
As would I Dr. Snow.