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Daekyras
07-17-2014, 08:13 AM
I have a question about the recent nomination of WoT for a Hugo.

I know some people were questioning the entire series being nominated but i was wondering if any of the individual books had been nominated when they were released?

Are individual books within a series allowed to be nominated?

Im wondering, as if they were nominated i would like to know what books beat tFoH and tSR???

yks 6nnetu hing
07-17-2014, 08:34 AM
The only reason why the series as a whole COULD be nominated was because none of the individual books had been nominated.

Individual books in a series can be nominated; A Dance With Dragons was nominated in 2012. Didn't win though (hehe)

It's a bit of a loophole, originally created with shorter series in mind, hence the (supposed) controversion.

ETA: The winner in 1994 (the year tFoH would have been eligible) was Green Mars by Kim Stanley Robinson; and in 1993 (when tSR would have been eligible) it was split between A Fire Upon the Deep by Vernor Vinge and Doomsday Book by Connie Willis

Nazbaque
07-17-2014, 08:37 AM
Well TSR is where the WoT books became more episodic. I suppose the words "to be continued" count against them. But I quite agree with your sentiment with the first three WoT books, which are less dependant on what comes next.

Daekyras
07-17-2014, 08:57 AM
The only reason why the series as a whole COULD be nominated was because none of the individual books had been nominated.

Individual books in a series can be nominated; A Dance With Dragons was nominated in 2012. Didn't win though (hehe)

It's a bit of a loophole, originally created with shorter series in mind, hence the (supposed) controversion.

ETA: The winner in 1994 (the year tFoH would have been eligible) was Green Mars by Kim Stanley Robinson; and in 1993 (when tSR would have been eligible) it was split between A Fire Upon the Deep by Vernor Vinge and Doomsday Book by Connie Willis

Thanks yks,

I was wondering. Its a shame the first five or six books hadn't been nominated. And im not going to go into the details of voting(cause i don't know them) but i have read all three of those winners you mentioned and none even come close to tFoH or tSR.

In fact, green mars is quite weak. Although, i do hate robinsons writing style so my judgement could be clouded!

Terez
07-17-2014, 09:07 AM
Thanks yks,

I was wondering. Its a shame the first five or six books hadn't been nominated.
Before the rise of the internet fandoms, when nominations tended to spring from the more limited con crowd and literary/journalistic review type things.

Isabel
07-17-2014, 12:35 PM
So who from Theoryland is voting in the Hugo's?

I know I am :D:D Or i did:)

Tomp
07-17-2014, 12:58 PM
I was amazed, in a neative way, when Scalzi won last year with Red Shirts.

I thought the premise was interesting but the writing was actually rather bad.
The second half of the book felt drawn out and uninteresting to me.

Jalyn
07-21-2014, 04:40 PM
Thanks yks,

I was wondering. Its a shame the first five or six books hadn't been nominated. And im not going to go into the details of voting(cause i don't know them) but i have read all three of those winners you mentioned and none even come close to tFoH or tSR.

In fact, green mars is quite weak. Although, i do hate robinsons writing style so my judgement could be clouded!

Doomsday Book is from the 90's? I'd always figured that to be at least a decade older based on the tech that she postulated for the future. (Video phones rather than mobility? By the 90s cell phones were a thing. Not a very big thing, but enough that she should have been able to realize that half the plot hinging on people not being able to get ahold of each other by phone was going to be an issue.)
Anyway, while I'm hardly going to argue against the quality on the early WoT books, Doomsday is a damn good book and I certainly wouldn't argue against it winning.

Daekyras
07-21-2014, 04:59 PM
Doomsday Book is from the 90's? I'd always figured that to be at least a decade older based on the tech that she postulated for the future. (Video phones rather than mobility? By the 90s cell phones were a thing. Not a very big thing, but enough that she should have been able to realize that half the plot hinging on people not being able to get ahold of each other by phone was going to be an issue.)
Anyway, while I'm hardly going to argue against the quality on the early WoT books, Doomsday is a damn good book and I certainly wouldn't argue against it winning.

Now, it has been a long time since i read it but am i right in saying "doomsday book" is the one with organised time travel for study of history? And the girl gets lost and cant find her location for getting back?

I hope that is the one in thinking of as i don't want to seem like an eejit when i say- in no way, shape or form is that in the same league as tSR. Its good, but a little bit derivative of similar stories and for some reason it really reminded me of timecode by Michael Crichton. Again, not sure which was printed first but i read timecode first!!

Jalyn
07-21-2014, 05:18 PM
Now, it has been a long time since i read it but am i right in saying "doomsday book" is the one with organised time travel for study of history? And the girl gets lost and cant find her location for getting back?

I hope that is the one in thinking of as i don't want to seem like an eejit when i say- in no way, shape or form is that in the same league as tSR. Its good, but a little bit derivative of similar stories and for some reason it really reminded me of timecode by Michael Crichton. Again, not sure which was printed first but i read timecode first!!

She's done several with the same basic concept, Doomsday Book is the one where the character that goes back in time ends up in the middle of an outbreak of the black plague.

There's a bunch of reasons that she misses her window to go back. She's dealing with the entire village dying around her. At the same time (er, a completely later time, kind of) the people that sent her there are dealing with a mass sickness themselves and don't actually open it to her time at the right time anyway so her advisor has to go back himself to find her.

I enjoyed it, but the black death outbreaks are fascinating to me in the first place, so I might have been primed for it a bit. I haven't read Timecode, so I have no idea what they have in common. That generally doesn't bother me unless it's obvious that the author read something and thought "well, I can do that." (See early Shannara and LotR.)

Davian93
07-22-2014, 07:46 AM
Doomsday Book is from the 90's? I'd always figured that to be at least a decade older based on the tech that she postulated for the future. (Video phones rather than mobility? By the 90s cell phones were a thing. Not a very big thing, but enough that she should have been able to realize that half the plot hinging on people not being able to get ahold of each other by phone was going to be an issue.)
Anyway, while I'm hardly going to argue against the quality on the early WoT books, Doomsday is a damn good book and I certainly wouldn't argue against it winning.

Clearly she was not a big Saved By The Bell fan...

http://38.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lgfcidcKLE1qh3qkyo1_500.jpg

Seriously, that's from 1991 or so...cell phones were pretty common then if you were rich and lived in a major metropolitan area.

GonzoTheGreat
07-22-2014, 09:41 AM
In Star Trek, people already had cell phones in the 1960s. They even (occasionally) had problems with the reception.

Hugh the Hand
07-24-2014, 11:29 AM
anyone else having trouble opening the books?

anyone have suggestions? do I need to book reader or something?

I am not a teckie or trekie