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irerancincpkc
09-22-2008, 02:25 PM
Has anyone ever worked a night shift before? I have an interview tomorrow for ten to seven. I would think it would be hard at first, but once you get into the flow of it, it would be easier. Just curious... :D

Terez
09-22-2008, 02:26 PM
I think you should stick with your nice government job.

I worked night shift for years - it's not bad unless it's long term. If you work night shift for a long time, you start to feel as if you have no life...

Hopper
09-22-2008, 02:27 PM
Been there, done that, got the t-shirt, drove off the road coming home after falling asleep at the wheel. I'll never do it again. :(

Davian93
09-22-2008, 02:30 PM
Spammer, we've worked night shift before and never had any issues with it. If you'll recall when we were in the army, we were on night shift frequently for months at a time.;)

Night shift is something your body gets used to after a couple weeks. Its also kinda cool to be up when everyone's asleep. 10-7 kinda cool since you can get home by 8 and crash till around 2-3 in the afternoon and be fine. You'll always get to run errands when things are open too.

Cary Sedai
09-22-2008, 02:31 PM
Never worked a night shift, however, I loved when my mom did. It's nice to be a teenager and your only parent works night shifts. :D

Brita
09-22-2008, 02:31 PM
There are nurses who love night shifts and nurses that hate them. I hated them- but for some people they had no trouble.

You won't really know how your body handles it until you give it a try.

Are you a light sleeper- or a sound sleeper? Will you have trouble sleeping during the day?

Davian93
09-22-2008, 02:32 PM
The night time is the right time, the night time is the right time...

RogueSavior
09-22-2008, 02:37 PM
Suntanned toes... tickling the sand.
Cold drink chilling in my, right hand.
...

yadayada, something about booze and sleeping

Night shifts blow.

irerancincpkc
09-22-2008, 02:55 PM
Dav, how could I forget about those night patrols we went on? Stupid me... :D

I can sleep soundly as long as it is dark. Luckly, I sleep in the basement. :D

But thanks everyone. I'm going to try and get it, and if I hate it I can always quit. Plus, the extra money for doing the night shift is a very nice incentive. :D

Davian93
09-22-2008, 03:00 PM
We worked in an office preparing briefing slides at night, silly. We were Intel, not infantry.

Night shift can be fun. What type of work is it?

irerancincpkc
09-22-2008, 03:04 PM
Sorry. I guess I got my stories mixed up; I tell all the girls we were infantry. Sounds a lot cooler. :D

The work is stocking shelves. Not exactly stimulating stuff, but I've been looking for a while and it'll help save money up for the mission.

tworiverswoman
09-22-2008, 03:22 PM
Dav... Spammer. Am I getting the idea that you two KNOW each other? (Or am I the last to know?)

That would explain a few things... ;)



Edited to add: I used to work either a 4-midnight or a midnight-8 shift at an answering service. The service was located on Hotel Street, Honolulu's "red-light district." I had some very entertaining views from my window (I was on the third floor of a corner building -- I could see up and down most of Hotel Street.) Up to and including the dead body that got dumped on a bus-stop bench just across from my office near the end of one of my 4-12 shifts. I had to walk past all the cops on the way to my car. THAT was uncomfortable...

One nice feature of those shifts was that parking was pretty easy to find. One bad feature was that I DON'T sleep well during the day.

I used to get a huge giggle out of telling people I met that I was "an operator on Hotel Street." ~Snrk~ The facial expressions were priceless!

Terez
09-22-2008, 03:43 PM
Dav... Spammer. Am I getting the idea that you two KNOW each other?
In the Biblical sense, no less...

Davian93
09-22-2008, 03:45 PM
Dav... Spammer. Am I getting the idea that you two KNOW each other? (Or am I the last to know?)

Spammer is one of my posting aliases...or multiple personalities...I can't quite remember. Perhaps Terez could explain it. It has to do with Barrier degradation and the use of tainted saidin. ;)

Cary Sedai
09-22-2008, 04:17 PM
lol - you're doing a wonderful job balancing your multiple personalities. :p

Birgitte
09-22-2008, 06:06 PM
Suntanned toes... tickling the sand.
Cold drink chilling in my, right hand.
...

yadayada, something about booze and sleeping

Night shifts blow.

LOL... Nice, RS. And that song is about staying up all night drinking, so it doesn't really fit.

And just because it came to mind... "Don't yada yada the Lord, Harry."


And never done a night shift. My sleep would probably really suffer. I sleep really lightly and I have quite a few requirements for sleeping soundly, one of which is darkness.

Terez
09-22-2008, 06:06 PM
Darkness can easily be achieved with things on the windows.

Birgitte
09-22-2008, 06:14 PM
Right. Complete darkness with shades. That happens. Really.

Terez
09-22-2008, 06:19 PM
Did I say shades? I was thinking more like black posterboard...

RogueSavior
09-22-2008, 06:28 PM
Please - that's one of like... ten things movie serial killers always have. Black posterboard on their windows.... honestly. Don't you watch movies?

People think B is weird already without THAT!

Terez
09-22-2008, 06:30 PM
Tinfoil works too. :D

RogueSavior
09-22-2008, 06:31 PM
Mad Scientist. Again with the weirdness.

Cary Sedai
09-22-2008, 06:33 PM
Tin foil works, too. Then you hang a heavy blanket on a curtain rod, so the tinfoil doesn't look all ugly. :)

Crispin's Crispian
09-22-2008, 07:05 PM
Tin foil works, too. Then you hang a heavy blanket on a curtain rod, so the tinfoil doesn't look all ugly. :)
Black plastic sheeting and duct tape. Works against chemical attacks, too.

But seriously, we have a shade in the bedroom of our new house, and it's dark as hell in there. And I would know, having done some consulting work on Infernal lighting options. (Turns out CFLs are more efficient than torches.)

Birgitte
09-22-2008, 07:10 PM
I'll go with it. You guys just start practising what you're going to tell the police. I'd start with "She SEEMED normal. The quiet type, you know?" but that's just me. ;)

Crispin's Crispian
09-22-2008, 07:12 PM
I'll go with it. You guys just start practising what you're going to tell the police. I'd start with "She SEEMED normal. The quiet type, you know?" but that's just me. ;)
"Quiet types" are usually frowned upon.

"She SEEMED normal. Nice, clean, articulate, you know?"

Birgitte
09-22-2008, 07:17 PM
lol... I know, SDog. I just can't seem to get away from the old stand-by explanation, though.

Sei'taer
09-22-2008, 11:06 PM
For about 6 years I work from 7 pm to 7 am, 3 nights on, 2 off, 2 on and 3 off. I loved it. I had every other weekend off and I got an extra $1 for working at night. People called me a vampire because in the winter I would never see the light of day, but it didn't ever bother me as far as sleeping and such. Go to the fabric store and buy some blackout material. You just hang it on the inside of the window, and if you get it good and tight, zero light will comethough.

Weird Harold
09-23-2008, 12:37 AM
Has anyone ever worked a night shift before? I have an interview tomorrow for ten to seven. I would think it would be hard at first, but once you get into the flow of it, it would be easier. Just curious... :D
In 21 years active duty, I worked a normal 9-5 dayshift for less than five years. I actually prefer midnight shift (2400-0700) because there are almost never any big bosses about and you can actually get some work done.

The best shift I ever worked was Midnight to Noon "three on and one off" (of course there was nothing else to do at that particular base except eat, drink, and play cards.)

However, if you're one of those people who can't shift their circadian rythms to night shifts, you'll hate it -- it will take at least a month for you to adapt completely, but when you do, you'll find that sunrises make you sleepy and sunsets wake you up.

(one tip: set your watch/digital clocks to show 24 Hr time. It saves o n confusion when youwake up in the dark and don't know whether it's 0-dark thirty or dinner-time.)

irerancincpkc
09-23-2008, 06:49 AM
(one tip: set your watch/digital clocks to show 24 Hr time. It saves o n confusion when youwake up in the dark and don't know whether it's 0-dark thirty or dinner-time.)
Nice idea. Thanks.

And Sei, I've always wanted to be a vampire... :D

Davian93
09-23-2008, 07:37 AM
Second WH's clock suggestion...it really helps the first few weeks.

In 21 years active duty, I worked a normal 9-5 dayshift for less than five years. I actually prefer midnight shift (2400-0700) because there are almost never any big bosses about and you can actually get some work done.

Exactly. Night shift is its own sub-culture. My favorite shift in the army that I did was 7pm-7am...I did that for 6 months in Bosnia and loved it. Dinner for breakfast, midnight chow at the chowhall and breakfast for dinner...then off to the gym and then pass out till 4 pm and do it again.

Ishara
09-23-2008, 08:39 AM
B, if you ever need it, a good blackout shade from the fabric store will do ya, and it wont look like tinfoil or plastic sheeting. They're regular shades with a layer of something (maybe carbon?) in between the two panels of fabric. Makes them a bit heavier, but definitely blocks out the light.

tanaww
09-23-2008, 10:54 AM
I worked night shift periodically and mostly hated it. Of course, the first time I had a one year old baby at home and it was just difficult. The second time, what made it tough was that it was not a consistent third shift. It was in the hotel industry so sometimes it was first shift, sometimes second, sometimes third. And I worked two jobs so it was either 11-7 or 12 - 8. I think if it is steadily a night shift and you've got no other commitments (pesky kids anyway) it's okay but I'm not a fan.

OTOH, my crazy grandmother worked Midnight - 8:00 for at least 25 years. She worked for the VA and got a LOT of crocheting done ;)

I guess that was no help...

Weird Harold
09-23-2008, 01:30 PM
... sometimes it was first shift, sometimes second, sometimes third.

Rotating sifts should be outlawed. I don't know of anyone who doesn't suffer mental and physical problems if they work rotating shifts for more than a couple of months.

It takes a month or so for most people to acclimate to a night-owl schedule and then another month or so to re-acclimate to a different schedule, but I don't think it's possible to really acclimate to something like "four days, one off, four swings, one off, four mids, three off" (a shift-schedule my ex-wife worked for about six months before she literally got sick of it and had to quit.)

Terez
09-23-2008, 01:33 PM
I used to have a boss who would schedule me for all three shifts during the course of a week. He seemed really surprised when I quit, too...

Frenzy
09-23-2008, 01:39 PM
Rotating sifts should be outlawed. I don't know of anyone who doesn't suffer mental and physical problems if they work rotating shifts for more than a couple of months.

It takes a month or so for most people to acclimate to a night-owl schedule and then another month or so to re-acclimate to a different schedule, but I don't think it's possible to really acclimate to something like "four days, one off, four swings, one off, four mids, three off" (a shift-schedule my ex-wife worked for about six months before she literally got sick of it and had to quit.)
Cops frequently rotate schedules. Might explain why so many of them are kooky.

My dad worked that rotating shift. That's where he met his current wife, shortly before i was born. 'nuff said.