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Rand al'Fain
02-23-2015, 01:40 AM
By that, what book/book series first got you into reading in the first place?

Me, it was Animorphs back in the 2nd grade. Prior to this, all we read were those stupid little stories that never went anywhere, I would end up getting way ahead seeing if the stories actually went somewhere but never did. Then I saw book with the picture of a kid turning into a fly. Read that book (was kind of the middle of the series, but all of them had a little prologue at the beginning explaining how it all began), went and got all the previous books and all the ones currently out, and have been hooked on reading ever since.

Though I will say, I was obsessed with dinosaurs at the time, so outside of whatever books a 2nd grader could find on them, up until Animorphs, I otherwise did not bother with books unless forced too.

Weird Harold
02-23-2015, 02:56 AM
I'm old enough that the Dick and Jane readers in first grade were absolutely riveting; I couldn't wait for the next reading lesson. :p

I'm not quite sure which came first outside of reading class, Green Eggs and Ham or Curious George (there was only one Curious George when I first got hooked, not the dozens of books and TV episodes there are now.)

The highlight of First Grade (and every other elementary grade) for me was access to the school library.

Other series that figured prominently in feeding my reading addiction were OZ, Hardy Boys, Tom Swift, Tom Swift Junior, Nancy Drew, Tarzan, Jpohn Carter, Pelucidar, H.G Wells and the entire east wall of the local small town library in my home town -- eg the fiction section.

yks 6nnetu hing
02-23-2015, 04:20 AM
Tricky to say - as far back as I remember, I've always loved reading. In fact, my mom says that nobody knows how I learned to read - apparently one moment I just read.

The first book I remember being obsessed about, reading it over and over and over again was the Hobbit; although that must have been when I was... maybe 8 or 9, and I'd definitely read other stuff before then. Mostly fairy tales, we had a huge collection of fairy tales: Andersen, Grimm, folklore tales both local and from the world over. The first book I ever bought from my pocket money was one of the Tarzan stories we didn't have yet. I also read the Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn stories, the Three Musketeers, the first few Narnia stories (because the later ones weren't translated yet, and by the time they were, I'd grown out of them), lots of Astrid Lindgren books - although a few of them were banned in the soviet times (Brothers Lionheart), Alice in Wonderland, Winny the Pooh... those are the more common Western ones I can remember, there were also Estonian children's books and some Russian ones, of course.

Mort
02-23-2015, 05:00 AM
The first books I remember reading were Enid Blytons Famous Five series at maybe 9-10? Really liked the adventures as a kid.

Daekyras
02-23-2015, 05:37 AM
Tricky to say - as far back as I remember, I've always loved reading. In fact, my mom says that nobody knows how I learned to read - apparently one moment I just read.

.

Awwww, Yks. We've talked about this....:)

I have 5 older brothers so I followed them in my reading.

In fact, I can pin point the exact moment I fell in love with a book/reading.

There were four of us in two sets of bunk beds in our room. I was 8 and my brothers were 10, 11 and 13. (and 2 girls in between those ages. Go Ireland).

Brian was 11 and was reading a book. I asked him what it was about. He then put on a performance as he described in great detail what the book was about. He read the little blurb at the back and put such emphasis on it I was enthralled. I couldn't wait to read it after he was done. That was the first novel that didn't have the Hardy boys in it.

The book was Magician by Raymond E Feist and he was my favourite writer(maybe David Gemmell) until 1991 when I "borrowed" the same brothers copy of The eye of the World....

yks 6nnetu hing
02-23-2015, 05:45 AM
Awwww, Yks. We've talked about this....:)

I have 5 older brothers so I followed them in my reading.

hehe, I'm the eldest of three so it's probably not that I followed one of them ;) More likely, it was my dad's typing machine that I used to admire and want to play with... a LOT. Actually maybe because I'm the eldest, I can remember that mom and dad used to read to us - always fairy tales, the ones with pictures were the best. But also adventure stories, I have a very vivid memory of dad reading (what I now know is) the first chapters of The Son of Tarzan to us :D

Daekyras
02-23-2015, 06:00 AM
hehe, I'm the eldest of three so it's probably not that I followed one of them ;) More likely, it was my dad's typing machine that I used to admire and want to play with... a LOT. Actually maybe because I'm the eldest, I can remember that mom and dad used to read to us - always fairy tales, the ones with pictures were the best. But also adventure stories, I have a very vivid memory of dad reading (what I now know is) the first chapters of The Son of Tarzan to us :D

Isn't it funny how memories like that can stay with us? My dad never read to us, he wasn't that kind of Dad, but I remember clearly him showing us how to tie our shoes. He had us practice on a door handle and then we had to tie our shoes. It is my first real memory and happened just before my first day of school. Thats my second really clear memory.

yks 6nnetu hing
02-23-2015, 06:24 AM
Isn't it funny how memories like that can stay with us? My dad never read to us, he wasn't that kind of Dad, but I remember clearly him showing us how to tie our shoes. He had us practice on a door handle and then we had to tie our shoes. It is my first real memory and happened just before my first day of school. Thats my second really clear memory.

hehe, yes, memories are funny like that. I've a few that are probably a combination of a real memory and people telling me it happened - like, mom reading my favourite story for me and me correcting her "no, read the whole story" - because I knew it by heart and she wanted to skip ahead. I don't actually remember what the text was, I remember pointing at the printed words and knowing that that text went with that picture. But I'm pretty sure that this memory wasn't a single episode, like remembering my dad reading to us. That scene must have repeated many times for it to print itself into my head as I was... maybe 3 or 4 then. On the other hand, the memory of dad reading, I can almost hear his tone of voice and even whole paragraphs of those first few chapters of that particular book. Whenever I read them, I hear my father's voice.

For my reference, how old are kids in Ireland when they go to school? That is namely vastly different in Holland and Estonia - we had kindergarten from 2 until 6 or 7; and then at 7 (in some cases 6) you go to school. In Holland they call it "school" at 4 already.

Daekyras
02-23-2015, 06:39 AM
hehe, yes, memories are funny like that. I've a few that are probably a combination of a real memory and people telling me it happened - like, mom reading my favourite story for me and me correcting her "no, read the whole story" - because I knew it by heart and she wanted to skip ahead. I don't actually remember what the text was, I remember pointing at the printed words and knowing that that text went with that picture. But I'm pretty sure that this memory wasn't a single episode, like remembering my dad reading to us. That scene must have repeated many times for it to print itself into my head as I was... maybe 3 or 4 then. On the other hand, the memory of dad reading, I can almost hear his tone of voice and even whole paragraphs of those first few chapters of that particular book. Whenever I read them, I hear my father's voice.

For my reference, how old are kids in Ireland when they go to school? That is namely vastly different in Holland and Estonia - we had kindergarten from 2 until 6 or 7; and then at 7 (in some cases 6) you go to school. In Holland they call it "school" at 4 already.

I was 4 going to primary school which was the norm back in the 80's.

Our two girls were both 5 and our little boy will probably be 6 on his first day. A lot depends on the time of year you were born. Most kids will be 5 in Ireland now as there is a "free" pre school year that was never there before.

I imagine you did tell your mam to read the whole thing. kids are very perceptive of things like that. And maybe you can remember it too. I can gaurantee she remembers it though. :)

Figbiscuit
02-23-2015, 06:52 AM
I can't remember my first book, like yks I can't remember a time when I ever didn't read. Mum once told me I read my first book at the age of three sat on a beach, I think it might have been the magic porridge pot? I have no recollection of it.

I don't particularly remember a lot of books or authors which stuck with me from being a young kid, apart from Enid Blyton, and mum worked in the local library which for me was like heaven so I think I ate through that like a .247 bookworm.. As I got older I'd just pick up anything I fancied from her bookshelves, so I read a lot of books which probably wouldn't be considered age appropriate really. I remember I was reading a Time to Kill when I started high school at the age of 13, and that deals with child rape and then murder and hate crimes in a pretty graphic way.

She got me into WoT at about 14 or 15 I think, she encouraged me to read a very wide range of fiction, she encouraged me to read full stop, I think because she was on her own with me when I was young and it was a very easy way for me to be occupied so she could get on with things. I have an awful lot of conversations with friends now about the sheer number of films I just never watched, and they don't get that I always preferred to just sit and read a book instead. Still do.

yks 6nnetu hing
02-23-2015, 07:12 AM
right. I think the same applies in Estonia: school always starts on September 1; if you're 7 on or before September 1 then you go to school. However, if a kid gets the say-so from the kindergarten, they may "skip a year" and go to 1st grate at 6 already. I remember there being a discussion about my brother because his birthday is on September 5; and if he'd waited another year, he would have been effectively a year older than almost everyone else in his class.

I went at age 6, and while I was younger than most, I wasn't the youngest in my class.

Then again, back in Estonia, kids are supposed to know how to read and do simple math and write print by the time they go to school. So maybe that means kindergarten is actually the equivalent of pre-school?

but, back to books. For the longest time I used to pick my reading material based on the thickness of the book - the thicker the better. I read Les Miserables at 12 or so; and the three Musketeers, and all of its sequels, and Count Monte Christo, and Solaris, The Moonstone, Marco Polo... I even read Maxim Gorki's "Mother", lol, because I'd already read everything else and that was the thickest book of the soviet propaganda pile which I hadn't touched until then.

SauceyBlueConfetti
02-23-2015, 01:17 PM
3rd grade, so maybe 8 years old,the teacher read Charlie and the Chocolate Factory aloud. I was mesmerized and found Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator to read as soon as she finished. Even at that age I recognized the need for MORE STORY!!!!

Isabel
02-23-2015, 02:11 PM
I am not sure what book i started reading.
I do know i read 'the letter for the king' by Tonke dragt a lot and read a lot of other books.

Around 10 / 11 i started reading books for adults.

rand
02-23-2015, 03:24 PM
The first book I read that seriously got me interested in reading was Harry Potter. My mom read it to me right after it came out when I was something like 6 or 7. After that I started reading and rereading it on my own. Then I got into LOTR, Hobbit, Terry Brooks (I thought Shanara was pretty cool back then lol) and finally WoT sometime around 2001.

I'm sure I read stuff before Harry Potter, but that's the first one that really got me interested in fantasy and reading in general. It's also probably why I still love Harry Potter, since I essentially grew up with it.

Rand al'Fain
02-23-2015, 10:04 PM
The first book I read that seriously got me interested in reading was Harry Potter. My mom read it to me right after it came out when I was something like 6 or 7. After that I started reading and rereading it on my own. Then I got into LOTR, Hobbit, Terry Brooks (I thought Shanara was pretty cool back then lol) and finally WoT sometime around 2001.

I'm sure I read stuff before Harry Potter, but that's the first one that really got me interested in fantasy and reading in general. It's also probably why I still love Harry Potter, since I essentially grew up with it.

I think Harry Potter was what got me into Fantasy as well, since the Animorphs series is/was sci-fi. My uncle got me the first two books (all that was out at the time) for my birthday back then.

Sarevok
02-24-2015, 11:49 AM
First series I read were the Kameleon and Arendsoog series, but I'm sure I'd been reading before that. No idea what, though. :)

Khoram
02-25-2015, 11:03 PM
I started off really reading with the Hardy Boys series. I'm pretty sure I read every single one if them. Then I migrated over to Harry Potter, and absolutely loved them. I also really liked the Shannara books, before I knew any better. :D

One book in particular that I remember reading over and over again was The Hatchet by Gary Paulsen. I had to read it for school, but I would always go back to it. There was something about it that caught my fancy.

Tomp
02-26-2015, 11:22 AM
I read The Hobbit when I was ~9 years old and then LOTR when I was about 12. Those are the ones I remember,, I'm sure there were others.

After LOTR I read D Eddings and T Brooks. I really liked Eddings until I read Jordan in the early 90's and noticed all the problems with Eddings books. I never really got into Brooks writing, I just read them because all the other fantasy reading kids did.

I had a two year period of reading Star wars books

After the mid 90's my book consumption was broader with more different kind of books, but that's another story.

Davian93
02-26-2015, 01:09 PM
and noticed all the problems with Eddings books.

There are zero problems with those books...they are all literary gold.


On a serious note, I recent reread The Elenium for the first time in probably 8-9 years. Those are pretty weakly written which saddens me as I loved them when I was 11-12 years old.

Still, they are miles better than that garbage that Terry Brooks wrote...of which I read most of those too back in the day. I tried to reread one of the early ones (I think it was Elfstones of Shannara) a year or so ago and it was just painful to read. You can walk across his entire "world" in like 5 days for one. Rainbow Lake is so large that you can paddle across it in a few hours. Going from the Dwarf lands to Elf lands on the far side of the map from each other is like a long 3 day journey.

Khoram
02-26-2015, 01:58 PM
There are zero problems with those books...they are all literary gold.


On a serious note, I recent reread The Elenium for the first time in probably 8-9 years. Those are pretty weakly written which saddens me as I loved them when I was 11-12 years old.

Still, they are miles better than that garbage that Terry Brooks wrote...of which I read most of those too back in the day. I tried to reread one of the early ones (I think it was Elfstones of Shannara) a year or so ago and it was just painful to read. You can walk across his entire "world" in like 5 days for one. Rainbow Lake is so large that you can paddle across it in a few hours. Going from the Dwarf lands to Elf lands on the far side of the map from each other is like a long 3 day journey.

Maybe they just walk really quickly... :rolleyes:

Terez
02-26-2015, 06:42 PM
I apparently learned to read when I was 3. I don't remember what my first books were, but my maternal grandmother whom I recently lived with had a big bookshelf full of things that my mom and her brothers read when they were growing up. They had almost a complete set of Nancy Drew and the Hardy Boys. I read them all I think, but I never read the Bobbsey Twins books which grandma also had. She lost all those books in Katrina.

I always spent my allowance on books, and I moved on to modern series books for kids like Sweet Valley and Babysitters' Club. I think I went from there to GWTW, John Grisham, Stephen King, and Anne Rice. Then fantasy, thanks to my college roomie from Oz who has published a few books now, nonfiction.

Davian93
02-26-2015, 07:29 PM
I apparently learned to read when I was 3. I don't remember what my first books were, but my maternal grandmother whom I recently lived with had a big bookshelf full of things that my mom and her brothers read when they were growing up. They had almost a complete set of Nancy Drew and the Hardy Boys. I read them all I think, but I never read the Bobbsey Twins books which grandma also had. She lost all those books in Katrina.

I always spent my allowance on books, and I moved on to modern series books for kids like Sweet Valley and Babysitters' Club. I think I went from there to GWTW, John Grisham, Stephen King, and Anne Rice. Then fantasy, thanks to my college roomie from Oz who has published a few books now, nonfiction.

My brother taught me to read when I was around 4 (just before Kindergarten). My first real books were those, the Boxcar Children and, of course, Choose Your Own Adventure. I was probably 1st grade or so when I started reading the bigger ones of them and my mom tried to stop me because she thought "Those are too advanced for you and you won't understand all the words". I then proceeded to show her the meanings of harder words by context clues and she allowed it. She was probably pretty shocked that a 6/7 year old could figure things out as apparently that is unusual. Ironically, they never got around to testing me for the "gifted" program until 5th grade despite my precociousness. For one, my odd view of the world (for a six year old) meant I didn't really fit in with other kids my age and thus I was a bit quiet socially until 4th/5th grade. My tests apparently came back quite high for such things...enough so that the school was shocked and they immediately put me in much more advanced classes. This was back before Common Core and No Kid Left Behind and all that other crap that takes away from such programs to focus on the ditch diggers of the world instead of the ones that might actually change things for the better (yes, I am an elitist in that way). Of course, I was pretty lazy in HS for a lot of reasons so I kinda just floated through. I didn't really ever get challenged until college and really when I was doing Intel stuff overseas for the military and then gov't later on. My advantages of a great memory, the ability to recall obscure things and make connections between seemingly random pieces of information were pretty well tailor-made for that world and for what I do now.

I have no idea why I just went off on that tangent.

Back on topic, I believe the first Sci-Fi/Fantasy book I ever really read was Enders Game in 4th grade and then I went through all the Sci-Fi at both local libraries. Asimov, Ben Bova, the Timothy Zahn SW books which were huge when I was in 5th grade, etc. I then found fantasy and went through all of those starting with Eddings and then Brooks and then Feist and a bunch of other lesser books. I found WoT quite by accident when I picked up tEotW used for like 50 cents at the North Wales public library in North Wales, PA. I, of course, fell in love immediately and read all of the books out at that time which was right around when tFoH had come out on hardback. I remember excitedly waiting for LoC to arrive at the library so I could read it.

Daekyras
02-27-2015, 05:40 AM
My brother taught me to read when I was around 4 (just before Kindergarten). My first real books were those, the Boxcar Children and, of course, Choose Your Own Adventure. I was probably 1st grade or so when I started reading the bigger ones of them and my mom tried to stop me because she thought "Those are too advanced for you and you won't understand all the words". I then proceeded to show her the meanings of harder words by context clues and she allowed it. She was probably pretty shocked that a 6/7 year old could figure things out as apparently that is unusual. Ironically, they never got around to testing me for the "gifted" program until 5th grade despite my precociousness. For one, my odd view of the world (for a six year old) meant I didn't really fit in with other kids my age and thus I was a bit quiet socially until 4th/5th grade. My tests apparently came back quite high for such things...enough so that the school was shocked and they immediately put me in much more advanced classes. This was back before Common Core and No Kid Left Behind and all that other crap that takes away from such programs to focus on the ditch diggers of the world instead of the ones that might actually change things for the better (yes, I am an elitist in that way). Of course, I was pretty lazy in HS for a lot of reasons so I kinda just floated through. I didn't really ever get challenged until college and really when I was doing Intel stuff overseas for the military and then gov't later on. My advantages of a great memory, the ability to recall obscure things and make connections between seemingly random pieces of information were pretty well tailor-made for that world and for what I do now.

I have no idea why I just went off on that tangent.

Back on topic, I believe the first Sci-Fi/Fantasy book I ever really read was Enders Game in 4th grade and then I went through all the Sci-Fi at both local libraries. Asimov, Ben Bova, the Timothy Zahn SW books which were huge when I was in 5th grade, etc. I then found fantasy and went through all of those starting with Eddings and then Brooks and then Feist and a bunch of other lesser books. I found WoT quite by accident when I picked up tEotW used for like 50 cents at the North Wales public library in North Wales, PA. I, of course, fell in love immediately and read all of the books out at that time which was right around when tFoH had come out on hardback. I remember excitedly waiting for LoC to arrive at the library so I could read it.

Did you ever read his "Conqueror" books? I loved them as a kid.

WinespringBrother
02-27-2015, 08:32 AM
Mysteries were my first favorites, starting out with Encyclopedia Brown and the Hardy Boys, then reading pretty much the entire Nero Wolfe series. I think the first fantasy sci/fi book I read was Thomas Covenent (just the first one), followed by Hobbit/Lord of the Rings, the Xanth series, Thiefworld, Fafhrd and the Grey Mouser, and Elric. I didn't start reading WOT until about 1999, which then ruined me for all the other f/sf I was reading at the time, mainly the Dark Elf novels lol.

Davian93
02-27-2015, 09:16 AM
Did you ever read his "Conqueror" books? I loved them as a kid.

Yup, I rather liked them too.

Lupusdeusest
02-28-2015, 05:22 PM
I don't remember my hook book. Mum regularly says I was born clinging to a book and that is why I had to be born by Caesarian.

Figbiscuit
03-05-2015, 11:44 AM
I apparently learned to read when I was 3. I don't remember what my first books were, but my maternal grandmother whom I recently lived with had a big bookshelf full of things that my mom and her brothers read when they were growing up. They had almost a complete set of Nancy Drew and the Hardy Boys. I read them all I think, but I never read the Bobbsey Twins books which grandma also had. She lost all those books in Katrina.

I always spent my allowance on books, and I moved on to modern series books for kids like Sweet Valley and Babysitters' Club. I think I went from there to GWTW, John Grisham, Stephen King, and Anne Rice. Then fantasy, thanks to my college roomie from Oz who has published a few books now, nonfiction.

T apparently has exactly the same reading history as me. Freaky.

ETA: Also, the Point books. Point Horror, Point Romance etc. Oh, and I read the Pern books over and again, I wanted a telepathic dragon buddy so badly. And some Heinlein featured in there too, Time for the Stars and Space Family Stone were the two I inherited. And I started getting into Pratchett at about 15 or so, although it took me a while to really get it. I am a terror for reading the same books over and over though and always deriving the same level of pleasure from them. Y

Terez
03-05-2015, 06:23 PM
T apparently has exactly the same reading history as me. Freaky.
Except for all that stuff you just listed which I have never read. :)

I read the Narnia books as a kid, and the Hobbit, but I couldn't get into the LOTR trilogy until my late teens because it took me a while to figure out I could just skip all the boring stuff at the beginning of the first book. I didn't read modern fantasy until about 1998, when my roomie got me started on the Eddings books. I read those several times over the next 4-5 years. From there I went to Goodkind, Feist, and WoT. A comic-loving friend introduced me to Gaiman somewhere in there.

I only read 4 Feist books, the Magician series, and I was bored, despite basically liking them. I liked Goodkind and WoT, reread those a few times times, and WoT came out definitively on top. Then I found Theoryland in late 2004 and from there I went to ASOIAF and Malazan. I can't remember when I first read Harry Potter, but I want to say it was right before I joined Theoryland. I didn't read them for a few years after they were recommended to me because I thought they were more kiddy than they actually were.

Aside from that I have only read a few other fantasy things. Brandon's books. A couple of Pratchett books including Good Omens. I've tried to read some other popular fantasy and just couldn't get into it.

I was attracted to fantasy for the same reason I was attracted to the Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew books as a kid: lots of books about the same characters.

I have an awful lot of conversations with friends now about the sheer number of films I just never watched, and they don't get that I always preferred to just sit and read a book instead. Still do.
Same here, except I have been changing in the last couple of years. For the first time in more than a decade, I'm following some TV shows. I still haven't watched many recent films, but I've been watching Polish and French films with subtitles. Watching TV (on my computer, naturally) is something to do when I'm eating or my hands are otherwise occupied with some task; it makes me feel like I'm not wasting time.

Over the last 20 years, I have only seen a handful of films in the theater. Almost all of them were adaptations of books I've read. The last film I saw in the theater was the first Hobbit movie. I haven't watched the second two. I went to the first Narnia movie, the last few Potter movies, the LOTR movies, and aside from that, only Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. That's the only non-book movie I've seen in the theater since the Matrix and the Phantom Menace. (I gather there's a book for the latter but I didn't read it.)

I think the main reason I have been changing and watching more TV than reading fiction recently is that I have been working at my computer and reading a lot of non-fiction. It kind of burns me out on reading. That, and WoT kind of ruined me for reading in general; it has to be really interesting to get and keep my attention. Finally, I still hate the actual TV; if I couldn't watch TV online I probably still wouldn't watch it. Though if I can figure out how to use the DVR that might make an acceptable alternative. Commercials and viewing schedules can go to hell.

Davian93
03-06-2015, 11:51 AM
I can't remember when I first read Harry Potter, but I want to say it was right before I joined Theoryland. I didn't read them for a few years after they were recommended to me because I thought they were more kiddy than they actually were.


I read them probably 4 or so years ago and thought they were pretty kiddy. Not in a bad way but they'd be the kind of books I'd want my kids to read and they were well done all around by Rowling. I will reread them every so often as they are a fun, relaxing read and its a fun universe that she created.

SauceyBlueConfetti
03-06-2015, 11:59 AM
I was attracted to fantasy for the same reason I was attracted to the Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew books as a kid: lots of books about the same characters.



After all the comments I realized Nancy Drew was a thing, and yep, probably led to the MORE STORY MORE STORY. I don't recall when I started reading those though. We had 52 of them...I remember because when I read them I counted them constantly to see how many were left before running out. I am sure there are more now. Ours were the yellow hardcover set. Heh. I wanted to be a detective.

The Little House on the Prairie books were huge for me. HUGE. I still think those are part of why I was a History major.

First fantasy stuff was Mary Stewart's Merlin Trilogy (added a 4th one later). The Crystal Cave is still on my "read every year" list. And Pern. Yeah, I still tear up at the thought of the dragons going between when their person dies.


I know we talked about this too, but I tend to collect books I love. I have 3-4 plus random signed untouchable sets of WoT between hardcover, paperback and Kindle. I have 3 sets of LOTR. I have 3 sets of the Mary Stewart books. 2 of Harry Potter.

Wow. I have a problem. :D

Davian93
03-06-2015, 01:51 PM
The Little House on the Prairie books were huge for me. HUGE. I still think those are part of why I was a History major.


Laura Ingalls Wilder's editor (well her daughter who helped ghostwrite them from some accounts) should have kept in the more adult portions about how they almost starved to death and how grim life on the prairie really was at times.

Terez
03-06-2015, 06:01 PM
I read them probably 4 or so years ago and thought they were pretty kiddy.
I never said they weren't, but I was imagining something much more mundane. What makes Harry Potter appealing to adult book nerds is its complexity and creativity.

Davian93
03-07-2015, 02:08 PM
I never said they weren't, but I was imagining something much more mundane. What makes Harry Potter appealing to adult book nerds is its complexity and creativity.

Agreed...I was more impressed by them than I thought I would be. I never really cared for the movies until after reading them actually.

Daekyras
03-07-2015, 03:02 PM
And Pern. Yeah, I still tear up at the thought of the dragons going between when their person dies.



I have mentioned my love of pern and of mrs maccaffrey here before. After her death I started reading them again and...I had to stop. It had been so long since I read them(and I was only a boy then) that I had completely forgotten some things. In my re-read they just jumped out at me and...I....I put them down. There were a couple of scenes where an effective rape turned into consentual sex. As if persistance is the key. That brought back the memories and though theyre vague I think there are some dubious views on homosexuality involved later on.

I will always cherish the few times I met that wonderful lady but I dont think I can read the books again :(

Durvasha
03-08-2015, 12:32 AM
I think my love of reading started from comics and children's magazines.

My dad used to bring Hindi children magazines for us since we were three, and says that sister and I used to fight about who could 'read' the pictures first. Once we learned our (Nepalese) alphabet in school, we started actually reading those Hindi magazines. Nepali and Hindi are written in the same script; grammar is identical; only about 50% of the words are different. And we were living in a border town at the moment so we were fairly well exposed to spoken Hindi.

Once I was in grade 1 and knew a few words, I used to read the English class book as soon as mom/dad bought it for the next class.

My first non-class English book was an abridged version of Alice in the Wonderland. Second was abridged Robinson Crusoe.

Once I started getting lunch money, it all went into books, both Hindi and English. Nepali non-poetry fiction is too pretentious with heavy words, and sucks.

Uno
03-08-2015, 03:11 AM
I started reading science stuff. I was rather into astronomy when I was a kid (alas, I couldn't figure out the math, so I became an historian). Then I got very interested in the Icelandic sagas, and my parents got me a full set when I was, oh, about 11 or so. That probably led me into fantasy in an indirect sort of way. I also simply read encylopedias ... started with a random entry and that led me to another and another, and so on. This gave me an impressive command of rather obscure facts. In other words, I went on wiki-binges long before Wikipedia existed.

SauceyBlueConfetti
03-10-2015, 12:36 PM
Laura Ingalls Wilder's editor (well her daughter who helped ghostwrite them from some accounts) should have kept in the more adult portions about how they almost starved to death and how grim life on the prairie really was at times.

Actually, her first version(s) of the books were more adult oriented and outright rejected by publishers.

They were revised for a child/tween audience and succeeded from there.

The Little House books are considered semi-fictional, semi-autobiographic. Her actual first autobiography was published a few years ago and contains much more gritty detail. It was interesting to read as an adult in comparison to the child-like awe I felt when I read Little House. Also...I read the books before I ever saw the tv show.

Davian93
03-10-2015, 12:53 PM
Actually, her first version(s) of the books were more adult oriented and outright rejected by publishers.

They were revised for a child/tween audience and succeeded from there.

The Little House books are considered semi-fictional, semi-autobiographic. Her actual first autobiography was published a few years ago and contains much more gritty detail. It was interesting to read as an adult in comparison to the child-like awe I felt when I read Little House. Also...I read the books before I ever saw the tv show.

I've been meaning to get around to reading that adult autobiography for a while now. I had read the books themselves (not knowing there was also a show) when I was quite young as they were a great read.

Morelikeunwisewoman
03-11-2015, 08:07 AM
I've been meaning to get around to reading that adult autobiography for a while now. I had read the books themselves (not knowing there was also a show) when I was quite young as they were a great read.

I loved little house in the big woods when I read it as a child. I got the next book (farmer child?) and didn't like it as much as the characters were different and as a kid I didn't understand the concept of multiple stories in the same universe.

I never read comic books!

Davian93
03-11-2015, 08:24 AM
I loved little house in the big woods when I read it as a child. I got the next book (farmer child?) and didn't like it as much as the characters were different and as a kid I didn't understand the concept of multiple stories in the same universe.

I never read comic books!

The next one was the husband's backstory/childhood? I never read them in any strict order so that didn't really throw me off. I recall liking that one a bunch actually.

SauceyBlueConfetti
03-11-2015, 11:51 AM
One of my favorite quotes from Patrick Rothfuss is after he started reading these to his son

Im also reading the Laura Ingalls Wilder books (the Little House series), and they should actually be named The Adventures of Pa Ingalls: Pioneer Badass.

Daekyras
03-11-2015, 12:22 PM
Thats why they had Michael Landon play him.

Davian93
03-11-2015, 09:31 PM
One of my favorite quotes from Patrick Rothfuss is after he started reading these to his son

Does the tv show have the scene from one of the later books where Pa Ingalls and his buddies dress up in blackface and put on a minstrel show and Laura's biggest concern was whether or not her dad shaved off his beard?

Even as an 8 year old, my mind was basically doing "WTF?!?"

Then there was the whole "Hmm...I'm 14 and he's 24, we should get married". Granted, that wasn't all that weird for frontier American society.

Daekyras
03-12-2015, 06:13 AM
Does the tv show have the scene from one of the later books where Pa Ingalls and his buddies dress up in blackface and put on a minstrel show and Laura's biggest concern was whether or not her dad shaved off his beard?

Even as an 8 year old, my mind was basically doing "WTF?!?"

Then there was the whole "Hmm...I'm 14 and he's 24, we should get married". Granted, that wasn't all that weird for frontier American society.

You were "WTF" over the minstrel show but kinda accepting of the 14yo getting married?

Why would you distinguish between them? I mean why not be WTF over both of them?

I never read the books. I am not even sure I have ever seen the books! I did watch the show every sunday growing up. Sunday ritual was always: Mass, Home for Breakfast, watch The Waltons and Little House on the prairie.

It was also the only TV we got to see in a week when we were under twelve.

Davian93
03-12-2015, 08:47 AM
Well, I think she actually "waited" till she was like 16 to get married but she was "courting/dating" Manny when she was like 14 or something. Dating in those days consisting of taking a sleigh or carriage ride home from church and/or school from what I recall (It has been a good 25 years since I read them).

It was a WTF on both though.

GonzoTheGreat
03-12-2015, 12:48 PM
Mind you, WTF might be more literally appropriate in regards to the 14 year old thing. Unless it was a very "adults only" minstrel show, at least.

Davian93
03-12-2015, 12:56 PM
Apparently, per Wiki, she was 18 and he was 28 when they got married...so not completely weird.

If that part of the books is accurate (and my memory is even close to accurate 25 years later), they started dating in 1880/1881 when she was 14 or 15 and he was 23 or 24. Per the books, IIRC, his sister was one of her teachers in the one-room school in Dakota Territory.

What a fun trip down memory lane of reading those books that just was. Next time I see them in a used book shop, I'm buying them to reread now.

Daekyras
03-24-2015, 11:30 AM
Apparently, per Wiki, she was 18 and he was 28 when they got married...so not completely weird.

If that part of the books is accurate (and my memory is even close to accurate 25 years later), they started dating in 1880/1881 when she was 14 or 15 and he was 23 or 24. Per the books, IIRC, his sister was one of her teachers in the one-room school in Dakota Territory.

What a fun trip down memory lane of reading those books that just was. Next time I see them in a used book shop, I'm buying them to reread now.

I find it sooo hard to go back to stuff like that. It's not that some of my older reading isn't great but that I get a certain way in and go, "Ahhhhh, thats what happens" and then switch off and move on...

Davian93
03-26-2015, 12:36 PM
I think it depends on the quality. I just reread Tigana for the first time in a few years and enjoyed it immensely this time around. I needed a book to take with me on vacation to Jamaica so I figured some nice "light" reading was in order.

All in all, GGK is such a great author though so I pick up on new things each time I read his stuff. I am still wondering what happens to Sandre, Devin and Baerd after the end where they all see the riselka. Which will die, which will fork and which will be blessed?

Ozymandias
07-15-2015, 09:31 AM
This book (http://www.amazon.com/Swamp-Revolution-Sterling-Point-Books/dp/1402757034), for whatever bizarre reason, got me hooked on reading at a very, very young age.

Yes, I am aware it is kind of a bizarre inspiration.