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View Full Version : Need some advice: is eleven too young to read WoT


Tamyrlin
04-13-2015, 01:50 PM
Yes, yes, I have my own opinion. I'm asking for yours.

My daughter wants to begin WoT. Of course, while I'm pleased, I know that she is one of us. I have to take her books away from her every night as she quietly devours them. She's read every Warrior Cat book (and many of them a few times) over the course of the last 16 months, and now she's moving on to the Wings of Fire series. That is to say, she'll devour these books once she begins. Though, it's possible that she will NOT enjoy them.

If eleven is the starting age, how many of them would you say still fit in that range? I recognize that everyone is a bit more or less ready at this age, so I'm asking more in general about this age group. It almost seems cruel to allow her to read one now, but then make her wait...like many of us had to wait...until getting access to each subsequent book. But maybe that's the best way to read them...that is, not all at once?

Comments? Suggestions?

Terez
04-13-2015, 01:54 PM
I believe I could have handled it at that age; I just wasn't aware of the existence of such books so I read other stuff. If she wants to read it, then by all means, she's ready.

Hugh the Hand
04-13-2015, 01:57 PM
He lives!

I started reading fantasy/science fiction about this age.

I did not discover WoT till much later.

I think WoT is relatively tame as to sexual language, it is there, but not exactly gratuitous.

There is death etc, but heck most of the "teen" series seem to have lots of deaths, IE Harry potter.

But I do not have kids, so cannot give you that perspective.

Daekyras
04-13-2015, 05:33 PM
Yes, yes, I have my own opinion. I'm asking for yours.

My daughter wants to begin WoT. Of course, while I'm pleased, I know that she is one of us. I have to take her books away from her every night as she quietly devours them. She's read every Warrior Cat book (and many of them a few times) over the course of the last 16 months, and now she's moving on to the Wings of Fire series. That is to say, she'll devour these books once she begins. Though, it's possible that she will NOT enjoy them.

If eleven is the starting age, how many of them would you say still fit in that range? I recognize that everyone is a bit more or less ready at this age, so I'm asking more in general about this age group. It almost seems cruel to allow her to read one now, but then make her wait...like many of us had to wait...until getting access to each subsequent book. But maybe that's the best way to read them...that is, not all at once?

Comments? Suggestions?

Hey Tam,

My eldest is just a litter older than that and she started reading them last year.

It was a big decision as she can be have quite an addictive personality. We got around it by telling her she could only get one every three months.

In the end we made a game of it. As she read I would ask her questions and get her to make predictions and theories. Then I would grade them!!I also blocked this and another website on the family desktop (kids don't have their own and aren't allowed smartphones).

she is on tDR at the minute and is loving it. Nothing in it the series is overly graphic and we encourage her to ask us about anything she doesn't understand.

Be prepared for a couple of things:

1. She loves egwene.
2. And Elayne
3. Questions questions questions questions. Especially on the old tongue. "Do you speak the old tongue daddy?" "Yes" ;)
4. None of her friends being into it. This is a bad thing.
5. Trying to play with any weapons you have. (It was same when she read hunger games. Had to put my bow in the gun cabinet!)
6. Tears.

but I would definitely say it is not too young if you are comfortable with it.

p.s. any chance of that upgrade to "well hung man of peace"? The people are clamoring for it!!!

eht slat meit
04-13-2015, 06:29 PM
Plenty of scary imagery, but I can't recall anything very graphic that ever happened in the books. Probably a product of Jordan's generation. Lots of insinuation, little explicit.

As long as you're comfortable explaining pillowfriends, clad in the light, and the ethics of a mighty hero exploding a whole bunch of innocent people, you should do okay.

Terez
04-13-2015, 07:19 PM
There's no need to explain pillow friends; I can't tell you how many adults I know who did not believe that pillow friends were anything but sleepover buddies. Many still don't believe it despite what RJ said.

Kimon
04-13-2015, 07:48 PM
There isn't really anything in any of the wot books of a suggestive nature, certainly not in comparison to say asoiaf or any of ggk's books. I'm not familiar with either of those series that you mentioned, but if she is old enough for series like Tolkien, Harry Potter, and the Hunger Games, she should be fine developmentally with everything in wot. At 11 I had already read Tolkien, the Iliad, the Odyssey, and quite a bit of Asimov and Piers Anthony type stuff. All of those (except Tolkien) had far more suggestive plots than wot. Wot is pretty tame both in terms of sexual and violent content.

Just checked the release date for Eye of the World - I read it about a year after it came out, so was probably 13. There was nothing in it that struck me as remotely risque or scandalous.

Weird Harold
04-13-2015, 08:01 PM
If eleven is the starting age, how many of them would you say still fit in that range? ...

Comments? Suggestions?

I'd start her with the Scholastic Books versions for the first book(s) (How many volumes did Scholastic print before giving up on the YA printings?)

I'd gauge her reaction/interest from there and let her progress at her own rate. I'd worry more about violence than sexual situations -- except for maybe having to explain Mat and pink ribbons in Ebou Dar.

Davian93
04-13-2015, 08:24 PM
Nah, 11 is fine assuming the kid is fairly intelligent/mature for their age. I was around 11 when I first started reading them.

Rand al'Fain
04-13-2015, 09:39 PM
Yeah, 11 should be okay. Nothing overtly bad, like Game of Thrones, at least not until late in the series. I read LOTR, The Hobbit, The Yearling, The Iliad, and others at about that age. She should be fine. Somethings may need to be explained, but shouldn't be too hard.

rand
04-13-2015, 10:54 PM
I think I was around 10 when I started reading WoT. I read the entire series straight through (which only went up to WH at the time). I think the only real issue I had was that I got bored after LoC. I read the first 6 books in about a month and a half, but then it took me a while to read aCoS, tPoD, and WH. When CoT came out I bought it right away, but stopped halfway through because I got bored with it. I later reread the whole thing and joined here.

Though I think I benefited from the fact that my parents don't read anything beyond newspapers, so they were hardly checking to make sure what I read was appropriate. I think I read asoiaf when I was 12 or 13.

Lupusdeusest
04-13-2015, 11:53 PM
I was 9-10 when I started WoT and 10-11ish when I started Robin Hobb, who has some rape scenes, but very well written.

yks 6nnetu hing
04-14-2015, 02:51 AM
11 should be ok. At 11 I'd read The Hobbit to shreds (but not LoTR, as that wasn't translated yet), and was digging into The Three Musketeers (and the sequels), Les Miserables, Narnia, Amber ... etc.

I mean, the Three Musketeers sounds all adventure-y and PG, but who's actually read the book? Because it contains adultery, murder and beheading.

The up side for you is that you're a huge fan of the books and she knows it, so she won't feel like she's alone or weird in any way if she likes them.

DahLliA
04-14-2015, 03:48 AM
I read comparable (in content, not scope) stuff at that age, so my completely uneducated opinion is to go for it.

GonzoTheGreat
04-14-2015, 05:14 AM
I'd read Frank Herbert's Dune and at least one of its sequels by that age.

I would say that it depends on the child whether or not it is a good idea. So for this specific case, I can give you a very definite "maybe". Hope that helps.

SomeOneElse
04-14-2015, 08:12 AM
Strongly forbid her to read it, so you're sure she reads this wonderful book from beginning til the end.
There's no need to explain pillow friends; I can't tell you how many adults I know who did not believe that pillow friends were anything but sleepover buddies. Many still don't believe it despite what RJ said.

And I'm one of those who don't believe aswell.

Just FYI I guess I started watching porn movies about that age (or a year later). But I am a boy if it changes somehting.

Davian93
04-14-2015, 08:44 AM
11 should be ok. At 11 I'd read The Hobbit to shreds (but not LoTR, as that wasn't translated yet), and was digging into The Three Musketeers (and the sequels), Les Miserables, Narnia, Amber ... etc.

I mean, the Three Musketeers sounds all adventure-y and PG, but who's actually read the book? Because it contains adultery, murder and beheading.

The up side for you is that you're a huge fan of the books and she knows it, so she won't feel like she's alone or weird in any way if she likes them.

Of course, if she doesn't like them, you understand you'll have to disown her. Otherwise, you're not a true fan freak.

So there's that to consider.

GonzoTheGreat
04-14-2015, 10:14 AM
Of course, if she doesn't like them, you understand you'll have to disown her. Otherwise, you're not a true fan freak.

So there's that to consider.
Then again, if Tam finds out now, he can still start all over with a new kid. If he waits a few more decades, that could be trickier. So from a practical point of view, it's best to start as young as possible.

Tamyrlin
04-14-2015, 12:33 PM
I asked her if she wanted it on her kindle instead. She flipped it over a few times and said, "No, I want this one. How many pages is it?"

Tamyrlin
04-14-2015, 12:42 PM
Of course, if she doesn't like them, you understand you'll have to disown her. Otherwise, you're not a true fan freak.

So there's that to consider.


I'm not sure how I'll react if my book geek doesn't like the Wheel of Time...

Davian93
04-14-2015, 01:59 PM
I'm not sure how I'll react if my book geek doesn't like the Wheel of Time...

She's going to give it back and say "You know, I think Jordan stole a bunch of this from Terry Goodkind"

Khoram
04-14-2015, 03:10 PM
She's going to give it back and say "You know, I think Jordan stole a bunch of this from Terry Goodkind"

That's just... just...

*shudder*

Daekyras
04-14-2015, 06:18 PM
She's going to give it back and say "You know, I think Jordan stole a bunch of this from Terry Goodkind"

Which would imply that tam had allowed her to read Goodkind....does anyone have the number for child protection services?

Isabel
04-15-2015, 12:16 AM
Lol, this thread is so full of awesome!

Davian93
04-15-2015, 09:09 AM
I was riding my bike into work today (hey, its a great way to stay in shape) and I had all sorts of ideas in response to this thread. The mind tends to wander when you're pedaling up and down hills for 12 miles. Thoughts included...

1. What if she becomes a Dragonmounter instead of a Theorylander?

2. You gotta be careful about her talking to boy WoT fans of that same age...all they've got on their mind is being Warder Bonded.

3. Every time she comes to you with a question, you absolutely must answer with "Read and Find Out"

4. Do you dare talk to her about black cords and two souls?

5. Will she think that its intuitively obvious that Graendal killed Asmo?

6. What happens if she says she wants to be Green Ajah? Or even worse...Red Ajah?!?:eek:

7. If she asks about pillowfriends...man that's gonna be awkward for Tam....cant really RAFO that one.

That's all I can remember from my ride in...mostly I remember being cold as it was 35 degrees out this morning.

GonzoTheGreat
04-15-2015, 09:28 AM
That's all I can remember from my ride in...mostly I remember being cold as it was 35 degrees out this morning.
It's only between 20 and 25 here, and that's very nice weather to ride a bicycle. For Dutch standards, at least.

Davian93
04-15-2015, 10:00 AM
It's only between 20 and 25 here, and that's very nice weather to ride a bicycle. For Dutch standards, at least.

35 F...which is around 1-2 C for a point of reference (Dav knows full well Gonzo is just being silly and understood that from the start).

GonzoTheGreat
04-15-2015, 10:11 AM
Actually, it is you who is being silly in using the old royalist unit instead of the proper Revolutionary one.

Davian93
04-15-2015, 10:21 AM
Actually, it is you who is being silly in using the old royalist unit instead of the proper Revolutionary one.

I should have been more scientific and simply said it was about 275 K out.

GonzoTheGreat
04-15-2015, 11:05 AM
Now that I think about it: do they use the same foot (measure of distance) in Tear, Tar Valon and Rhuidean?

fdsaf3
04-15-2015, 11:46 AM
I'm a bit surprised that I'm the only one speaking up so far with this perspective, but I would have encouraged her to wait a year or two before starting to read the series. We're all fans of the series - that's why we're here, after all. So I get why people are encouraging anyone to read the books.

For me, it's not a question of content. As many others have pointed out, Jordan does a fine job of alluding to things obliquely rather than saying it outright (it took me a few re-reads of the scene where Perrin walks in on Moiraine to understand what had happened). I also don't remember the early books as being overly graphic. Even the latter books (once we see the One Power used more explicitly as a weapon) don't go overboard with the violence and graphic deaths.

For me, it comes down to how much she's likely to appreciate the nuances of the story at this age. I don't know the girl, but when I was 11 and reading things like Stephen King's The Stand, I know I missed 70% of the content. I never shied away from reading big, complex books - but I also didn't absorb much of the material, either. If I had waited until I was a bit older to read some of those stories, I think I would have enjoyed them more. I also know I would have gotten more out of them.

So, that's my take on this: encourage her to wait, but don't forbid her from reading the books now.

I realize this is probably too late at this point, but I wanted to chime in.

GonzoTheGreat
04-15-2015, 12:29 PM
Then again, that can be easily remedied by a reread a few years later. Which most of us have done anyway, so it wouldn't be too unreasonable to consider this a possibility for her too.

Hugh the Hand
04-15-2015, 12:54 PM
also a lot of the nuiances in the first books are less important to the story in those books. But important to the entire series.

So a child can grow with the story.

that being said rereads help and also, you are not wrong it is tough to catch a lot in the books

fdsaf3
04-15-2015, 12:56 PM
Without a doubt the books can be reread. I thought about that before writing my last post, and I opted not to include my thoughts on the possibility.

Ultimately, I think it's a question of rereading the books due to not "getting it" or being oblivious to some of the more nuanced aspects of the content versus rereading the series out of more enjoyment-oriented reasons.

It should also be noted that nothing I'm saying is meant to be definitive one way or the other. This is simply my take on this rather subjective question.

rand
04-15-2015, 10:54 PM
Yeah, basically everything I said was based around presumed future rereads. When I read WOT at Tam's daughter's age, I certainly didn't "get" everything. Hell, I still don't. But I reread it eventually. One thing that will certainly help is that she'll have someone to go to if she doesn't understand some of it. If I'd gone to my parents and asked them to help me understand a section of a book, they would have just laughed at me, lol.

Tamyrlin
04-16-2015, 12:46 PM
I was riding my bike into work today (hey, its a great way to stay in shape) and I had all sorts of ideas in response to this thread. The mind tends to wander when you're pedaling up and down hills for 12 miles. Thoughts included...

1. What if she becomes a Dragonmounter instead of a Theorylander?


...wow, that hadn't crossed my mind. I mean...damn.


2. You gotta be careful about her talking to boy WoT fans of that same age...all they've got on their mind is being Warder Bonded.


Now this one, she can handle. She's the assertive, get the f*** away from me kind of person...at ten.


3. Every time she comes to you with a question, you absolutely must answer with "Read and Find Out"


Hah. Yes. Must.


4. Do you dare talk to her about black cords and two souls?


...ouch...


5. Will she think that its intuitively obvious that Graendal killed Asmo?


...can you imagine?


6. What happens if she says she wants to be Green Ajah? Or even worse...Red Ajah?!?:eek:


This is an interesting question. I do wonder where she will find herself.


7. If she asks about pillowfriends...man that's gonna be awkward for Tam....cant really RAFO that one.


I highly doubt she'll even notice it.


That's all I can remember from my ride in...mostly I remember being cold as it was 35 degrees out this morning.

I think this would make a great blog like post. Questions parents of WoT fans should be ready for. Or, what your WoT fan means when she says...

Tamyrlin
04-16-2015, 12:48 PM
So, that's my take on this: encourage her to wait, but don't forbid her from reading the books now.

I realize this is probably too late at this point, but I wanted to chime in.

So far, from what I can tell, she has a variety of books she is interested in reading right now, and it appears she didn't expect me to actually say she could read the book. Her focus is split, so I think I will now leave it up to her to actually pick it up and read.

GonzoTheGreat
04-16-2015, 01:01 PM
So basically you have a Don't Ask, Do Tell policy?