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Davian93
05-04-2015, 07:23 AM
Hi T...as the only pianist I know, I had a couple questions.

Have you ever heard of Orion Weiss? My wife and I saw him in concert over the weekend and he was really impressive. He played Mendelssohn's Piano Concert No. 1 along with the Vermont Symphony Orchestra and it was just phenomenal.

Also, have you ever heard of the Adamant School of Music? Its apparently a big deal for pianists. We go to concerts there alot in the summer (the co-op next door does awesome friday night cookouts too). Apparently its a really good piano school but its in the middle of nowhere in north-central VT.

Terez
05-04-2015, 03:20 PM
I have never heard of him, but that's because I don't listen to piano music much. Most pianists irritate me, and I usually only hear of them if they play Chopin. Weiss apparently doesn't play Chopin.

I looked him up on YouTube and he's got some videos including an open rehearsal of him playing the 1st movement of the Grieg concerto (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=34kVwniEm3g).

He is a good pianist. There are a lot of good pianists out there, so it's not surprising I've never heard of him. He plays certain bits of the Grieg a good deal slower than most professionals, and his technique is not quite flawless. That puts him somewhere around the 3rd tier of performing pianists (which includes most of the best university piano professors).

I have also never heard of the piano school. I just talked to my old piano prof on Friday; I'm sure she has heard of it, but it's not the kind of thing I would have ever gone to. It's the kind of thing competition pianists go to.

Davian93
05-05-2015, 06:54 AM
So, $9 a ticket (student rate) was a good purchase for him? Would the full price of $48 also have been about the going rate? As a complete layperson, he sounded good to me. Mind you, I cant even play chopsticks so... It was a fun point/counterpoint with him and the orchestra. One odd thing I did notice as we were sitting 2nd row about 10 ft from him...he seemed to mouth words to himself the entire time he was singing. Is that normal or is he a paranoid schizophrenic who was on the verge of murdering all 1500 people in attendance?


The Adamant thing is cool simply because its always free and its a really nice little hamlet.

GonzoTheGreat
05-05-2015, 07:28 AM
Is that normal or is he a paranoid schizophrenic who was on the verge of murdering all 1500 people in attendance?
Isn't what you describe perfectly normal behaviour for a piano player? :confused:

Davian93
05-05-2015, 08:17 AM
Isn't what you describe perfectly normal behaviour for a piano player? :confused:

Have no idea...

Terez
05-05-2015, 06:46 PM
So, $9 a ticket (student rate) was a good purchase for him?
Yup, that's about right. I paid a little less for a 4th tier piano prof a while back.

Would the full price of $48 also have been about the going rate?
That is high. That's about what you would pay for a 1st tier pianist at a major venue.

PS: My friend who has been to see Evgeny Kissin a few times says that's about what the economy seats cost in Chicago, and that it's around $80-100 for good seats. And she has also never heard of Orion Weiss.

One odd thing I did notice as we were sitting 2nd row about 10 ft from him...he seemed to mouth words to himself the entire time he was singing. Is that normal or is he a paranoid schizophrenic who was on the verge of murdering all 1500 people in attendance?
Maybe he idolizes Glenn Gould (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qB76jxBq_gQ).

yks 6nnetu hing
05-06-2015, 01:49 AM
It was a fun point/counterpoint with him and the orchestra. One odd thing I did notice as we were sitting 2nd row about 10 ft from him...he seemed to mouth words to himself the entire time he was singing. Is that normal or is he a paranoid schizophrenic who was on the verge of murdering all 1500 people in attendance?

One of the fun parts of being married to a professional musician is learning to pay attention to what happens on the stage; stuff that most people in the audience won't even notice because the band covers it up and moves along but afterwards in the dressing room there'll be a shouting match. For example, when the second singer has a solo and decides to end it by cueing a guitar solo... without any notice in advance and without discussing it first with the band. Or when there's been an agreement beforehand to do a song half a tone lower... and then the guitar player begins half a tone higher. Or when the singer is not on time/forgets the lyrics/forgets it's their time to sing the refrain. Or when the saxophone player is not on time (which apparently is most of the time). The back-and-forward between a single musician and an orchestra/band is often practiced (honestly, true jam sessions just sound messy to me) and/or written in the score.

As for mouthing words while playing, lots of musicians do that :) ETA: for example, yelling chords to the substitute base player, or frantically telling everyone "bridge, bridge!" Not all, obvs, but if they know the piece well, they're less focused on not screwing up their part and more focused on how the whole of the music is supposed to come together. Dai always has some music rambling around in his head. He's often tapping his fingers randomly or thinking about a particular sound and how to get his equipment to make that sound or... well, you get the point.

Also, bit of a side note, when having dinner with musicians, be prepared for LOTS of vocalizations of beats, bits of melody lines, discussion on chord progression and other mind-numbingly boring stuff if you're the only one there who doesn't do music. It's like being stuck between an Arsenal and Manchester fan while knowing nothing about soccer.

Khoram
05-06-2015, 08:33 AM
One of the fun parts of being married to a professional musician is learning to pay attention to what happens on the stage; stuff that most people in the audience won't even notice because the band covers it up and moves along but afterwards in the dressing room there'll be a shouting match. For example, when the second singer has a solo and decides to end it by cueing a guitar solo... without any notice in advance and without discussing it first with the band. Or when there's been an agreement beforehand to do a song half a tone lower... and then the guitar player begins half a tone higher. Or when the singer is not on time/forgets the lyrics/forgets it's their time to sing the refrain. Or when the saxophone player is not on time (which apparently is most of the time). The back-and-forward between a single musician and an orchestra/band is often practiced (honestly, true jam sessions just sound messy to me) and/or written in the score.

As for mouthing words while playing, lots of musicians do that :) ETA: for example, yelling chords to the substitute base player, or frantically telling everyone "bridge, bridge!" Not all, obvs, but if they know the piece well, they're less focused on not screwing up their part and more focused on how the whole of the music is supposed to come together. Dai always has some music rambling around in his head. He's often tapping his fingers randomly or thinking about a particular sound and how to get his equipment to make that sound or... well, you get the point.

Also, bit of a side note, when having dinner with musicians, be prepared for LOTS of vocalizations of beats, bits of melody lines, discussion on chord progression and other mind-numbingly boring stuff if you're the only one there who doesn't do music. It's like being stuck between an Arsenal and Manchester fan while knowing nothing about soccer.

This all sounds like my family. My grandfather on my mom's side was a clarinetist in the MSO, and all of her siblings (9 of then) did music in some form. My mom and one of her sisters are professional singers, one of my uncles moved to London, England and is a professional clarinetist/pianist. The rest of them, although not doing music professionally, frequently get together for musical evenings. Tye running joke is that when there's a Lafontaine family gathering, they're going to break out into ten-part harmony. And it will sound good, too. You should hear our rendition of Happy Birthday. :D

Even one of my sisters went on to study classical music in university. And she frequently talks mumbo jumbo music stuff. :p I can at least understand some of it.

yks 6nnetu hing
05-06-2015, 09:28 AM
This all sounds like my family. My grandfather on my mom's side was a clarinetist in the MSO, and all of her siblings (9 of then) did music in some form. My mom and one of her sisters are professional singers, one of my uncles moved to London, England and is a professional clarinetist/pianist. The rest of them, although not doing music professionally, frequently get together for musical evenings. Tye running joke is that when there's a Lafontaine family gathering, they're going to break out into ten-part harmony. And it will sound good, too. You should hear our rendition of Happy Birthday. :D

Even one of my sisters went on to study classical music in university. And she frequently talks mumbo jumbo music stuff. :p I can at least understand some of it.
and they look funny at me when I mention going to Waterloo on June 18th because 200 years.

The other day Dai had to/got to loan a synthesizer from a buddy of his (and not any synth either, that's apparently THE synth) and he seemed genuinely confused when I said I'd wait in the car.

Khoram
05-06-2015, 10:07 AM
Ha!

Who doesn't love a good synth? :rolleyes:

Davian93
05-06-2015, 10:18 AM
Another fun concert we went to like two weeks ago was the Nordic Fiddlers Bloc...basically 3 Nordic fiddlers (a Swede, a Norwegian and a guy from the Shetlands)

Really nice fiddle music overall...especially for the price which was low.

Terez
05-06-2015, 10:53 AM
It's good to live near a college town with a good music school. You can often hear good music for cheap or even free. Music students and faculty have to give recitals, and they're almost always free, even the faculty. The faculty generally only charge for concerts if they perform elsewhere. There are exceptions to that, especially at the top-tier schools, but you don't have to go top-tier to hear good music. The competition is so tough for music faculty positions that most of them go to people who have top-tier education.

When Marie was doing her sabbatical at UW-Madison she went to free organ concerts every week, if I recall.

Davian93
05-06-2015, 05:38 PM
UVM has a music school...I don't know how good it is of course (I don't think its a top school or anything). We've gone to free concerts there before. One of the reasons we go to Adamant is that its free...which is nice.

The Unreasoner
05-07-2015, 09:34 PM
See my brother told me so, you'll be the greatest man alive when I'm gone, so there's music in my bones, in my heart and in my soul, and till I'm through and God takes me home, everything that comes out of my trombone... fire and brimstone (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yLfsLx04GjE)

Awesome. That's the kind of band you pay to see.