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SauceyBlueConfetti
07-20-2015, 11:42 PM
Let's talk food. Enough with politics

Favorite late night snack?

Favorite breakfast?

Tried anything new lately? Recipe or just experienced a new dish?

A friend that lived in Japan for 10 years made me sushi recently. Amazing.

I am on a Moscato kick right now, I could have a glass daily.

Khoram
07-21-2015, 12:11 AM
When I was in Provence, I had fois gras out the first time. It was extremely decadent. Don't know if I would necessarily order it again, but it was a nice experience. I enjoyed it.

I'll also eat most anything. Except raw broccoli. And raw cauliflower. Oh, and minestrone soup. Blegh.

The Unreasoner
07-21-2015, 01:11 AM
Not quite the season for it...but I love this soup late at night (or french onion soup with grilled cheese, but according to my tland notes, I already shared my recipe for that):

Cream of Pumpkin Soup
from "Ducasse Made Simple by Sophie" (http://www.amazon.com/Ducasse-Made-Simple-Sophie-Simplified/dp/2848440422)

This is a lovely, bright fall soup. Look for small (2- to 3-pound) "sugar" pumpkin that is ideal for cooking. (The large "jack-o'-lantern" pumpkins are too tough, and have lost their sugar; some have been wax-coated for longevity. Always make sure a pumpkin is suitable for cooking.) To dress this soup up in a variety of ways, Chef Ducasse suggests garnishes such as small, homemade croutons sautéed in butter or a spoonful of wild mushrooms such as chanterelles, sautéed in olive oil. You can also add a pinch of spicy ground red chili pepper to the heavy cream before whipping.

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 onion, thinly sliced
1 leek (white part only), thinly sliced
1 pound sugar pumpkin, cut into small chunks and peeled
6 cups chicken broth
3/4 cup ricotta cheese
5 ounces slab bacon, diced small
1/2 cup heavy cream
Fine sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper

In a medium stockpot, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the sliced onion and leek, and cook for 2 to 3 minutes, stirring frequently, until they soften and begin to look translucent. Stir in the pumpkin and a dash of salt and pepper. Add the chicken broth and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to low and simmer for 45 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove from the heat, add the ricotta cheese, and stir to combine. Transfer the mixture to a blender and puree until smooth. Adjust the seasoning to taste.

While the soup is cooking, heat a medium skillet over high heat. Add the bacon and cook, stirring frequently, until browned and sightly crispy. Set aside. In the bowl of an electric mixer, whip the heavy cream with a pinch of salt until the mixture forms stiff peaks.

Ladle the pumpkin soup into warmed bowls and garnish each serving with the diced bacon. Add a generous spoonful of whipped cream in the center of each bowl and serve immediately. From metrocurean.


Alternatively, if you're looking for something simple: microwaved popcorn with truffle butter. Awesome. You can use oil, but most of those are artificially flavored.

But moscato? You're better than that, lol.

ETA: The soup freezes pretty well, so you can make extra. But freeze it before you add the ricotta.

yks 6nnetu hing
07-21-2015, 01:30 AM
I've ben trying out different wines. White, because red usually gives me a headache within the first 2 sips. So far I've found out that I don't like Australian Chardonnay. Or rather, any time the bottle says it has melon undertones, which so far has been all of the Australian Chardonnay's I've tried, it tastes like mold to me. The South African ones are a bit sour and sharp for my taste, but the California ones are nice. As are the French and Spanish ones. I also discovered that I really quite like a nice Sauvignon Blanc.

In a way this feels a bit like the time I watched all of the James Bond movies in order over a period of maybe 3 months; just so I would know for myself what the differences are between all the actors (Brosnan's the best one, though Dalton had the best plots. Late Moore is the worst).

I actually do this all year round, but it's especially nice in the summer: frozen fruit. I just eat them frozen, not defrosted. well... not so frozen that my tongue sticks to them but so that they're a nice sorbet consistency. yum!

Daekyras
07-21-2015, 04:08 AM
Let's talk food. Enough with politics

Favorite late night snack?

Favorite breakfast?

Tried anything new lately? Recipe or just experienced a new dish?

A friend that lived in Japan for 10 years made me sushi recently. Amazing.

I am on a Moscato kick right now, I could have a glass daily.

Whatever you do, DO NOT FEED THEM AFTER MIDNIGHT!

My favourite breakfast is porridge. A couple of pieces of dried fruit/nuts to give it a bit more flavour and you are set for the day. Hmmmm.

For a treat, and maybe my love of America is showing again, but pancakes and bacon with an egg is a delicious breakfast.

@yks- I have never gotten into wine. I don't think it all tastes like vinegar or that is is too dry and tastes the same etc. I can drink it but mostly I just find reds to fruity and heavy and whites too crisp and even when someone who knows pairs it with food I am left underwhelmed. Mrs daek comes from wine country and she finds my lack of wine tasting abilities hilarious. Especially as I have been known to be a beer snob!

Edit: brosnan was a great bond. Goldeneye is a joy too watch. The problem is that the subsequent films are bad. He is great in them but the plots and silly focus on gadgets is annoying. And sub characters that just feel out of place. Goldie as a heavy anyone? Robbie Coltrane as a Russian spy master??

GonzoTheGreat
07-21-2015, 04:18 AM
Whatever you do, DO NOT FEED THEM AFTER MIDNIGHT!
Is that "midnight, local time" or "midnight according to the clock"?

Over here, at the moment, what with not living on top of the time zone meridian and also having daylight saving time going on, there is a difference of one hour and forty minutes between the two. That's quite a lot of time in which one can make a mistake unwittingly, you know.

yks 6nnetu hing
07-21-2015, 04:53 AM
@yks- I have never gotten into wine. I don't think it all tastes like vinegar or that is is too dry and tastes the same etc. I can drink it but mostly I just find reds to fruity and heavy and whites too crisp and even when someone who knows pairs it with food I am left underwhelmed. Mrs daek comes from wine country and she finds my lack of wine tasting abilities hilarious. Especially as I have been known to be a beer snob!

Edit: brosnan was a great bond. Goldeneye is a joy too watch. The problem is that the subsequent films are bad. He is great in them but the plots and silly focus on gadgets is annoying. And sub characters that just feel out of place. Goldie as a heavy anyone? Robbie Coltrane as a Russian spy master??

Brosnan was awesome but you're right, his scripts were not that great. They've gotten better with Craig, but the best ones still belong to Dalton. Living Daylights is a great movie in and of itself.

see, this is why I'm trying them out. I already know red's not my thing; but as for whites it's always a hit and miss; I mean usually I'll just go for a generic Chardonnay because that's supposedly the easiest to drink. Or, you know, I might be masking my building drinking problem with "oh I'm just learning about wines"... work *has* been very stressful; and we *are* in the middle of a renovation/moving house...

Khoram
07-21-2015, 08:16 AM
Wine is amazing. I grew up drinking reds, and because my parents never had whites (because they didn't care for them) I,too grew up preferring red to white. However, since I've been going to wine shows for the past while, and now that my aunt is studying to be a sommelier, I have gained a much greater appreciation for whites, and will actively seek them out now. I love the crispness of a good Riesling, I had some nice South African whites (although there was one that tasted like a cigar), and I've had many fantastic and interesting reds, as well.



Man, daek. Even when wine is properly paired with food, you feel underwhelmed? Wow.

Isabel
07-21-2015, 01:25 PM
I don't drink any wine (perhaps i should try).

My breakfast is simply bread and nutella :) :)

The Unreasoner
07-21-2015, 02:03 PM
Daek:

Try a French red Burgundy. More subtle than the Californian Bordeauxs (though those are my favorites), while not being as dry as something like gerwustraminer (sp?). Or you could go the other way, and get a Californian chardonay.

Pair it with roast chicken, or duck.

SauceyBlueConfetti
07-21-2015, 03:41 PM
Paso Robles Tears of Dew. :p. I like a glass with some grapes rolled in bleu cheese and crushed nuts. Try it Un and get back to me ;)

Khoram
07-21-2015, 04:57 PM
Daek:

Try a French red Burgundy. More subtle than the Californian Bordeauxs (though those are my favorites), while not being as dry as something like gerwustraminer (sp?). Or you could go the other way, and get a Californian chardonay.

Pair it with roast chicken, or duck.

Umm... For a wine to be a Bordeaux, it has to come from the Bordeaux region. In France.

Ergo, there's no such thing as a Californian Bordeaux.

Burgundy is fantastic. What I came to love in Provence was Rosé. They have some fantastic Rosés there; which they should have, seeing as Provence is known for their Rosés.

The Unreasoner
07-21-2015, 05:04 PM
I like a glass with some grapes rolled in bleu cheese and crushed nuts.
That rerminds me of another thing I like:
Take some shredded cheese blend (I like edam and gruyere, but there are many possibilities. Just make sure one of them melts well) and sprinkle it on a cookie sheet covered with tinfoil in little piles with some walnuts, raisins, and sage. Then throw it in a broiler until it melts and crisps a little bit. When you pull it out, peel the tinfoil away from the cheese discs, and roll them up (you can roll it into cones, but I've never found anything that really 'works' as a filling) into cylinders. Let them cool, and you have an awesome snack or garnish.

There are, of course, infinite variations. Use craisins and blue cheese with edam, parmesean, and bacon bits to make something to garnish a salad (though I would skip the sage, maybe in favor of citrus zest and a (tiny) bit of nutmeg).

The Unreasoner
07-21-2015, 05:07 PM
Umm... For a wine to be a Bordeaux, it has to come from the Bordeaux region. In France.

Ergo, there's no such thing as a Californian Bordeaux.

Burgundy is fantastic. What I came to love in Provence was Rosé. They have some fantastic Rosés there; which they should have, seeing as Provence is known for their Rosés.
You know what I mean. Bordeaux wines use different species of grapes. For instance: cabs, merlots...these are Bordeaux varietals. Pinot Noir is a burgundy varietal.

California makes fantastic meritages of the red Bordeaux varitals.

Khoram
07-21-2015, 05:37 PM
You know what I mean. Bordeaux wines use different species of grapes. For instance: cabs, merlots...these are Bordeaux varietals. Pinot Noir is a burgundy varietal.

California makes fantastic meritages of the red Bordeaux varitals.

Well, yeah.


Fun story - there's a bunch of roads near my place that are named after various wines, and varietals of grapes, and other alcohol... like Merlot, Grenache, Syrah, Champagne, Sangria, Sauvignon...


Just had a pork tenderloin stuffed with goat cheese, arugula, and sun-dried tomatoes. Served with an Alternate Palazzi Masottina 2009. It was delicious. :D

The Unreasoner
07-21-2015, 05:54 PM
Well, yeah.
Smartass.

It's like Kobe beef. Sure, real kobe comes from a specific process and region and species. But pretty much all 'kobe' beef consumed (at least in the US) is from a similar process on local Wagyu/Angus hybrids. I don't even think it's still legal to import real kobe beef.

Khoram
07-21-2015, 06:03 PM
Smartass.

It's like Kobe beef. Sure, real kobe comes from a specific process and region and species. But pretty much all 'kobe' beef consumed (at least in the US) is from a similar process on local Wagyu/Angus hybrids. I don't even think it's still legal to import real kobe beef.

:p

Yeah, but I'm pretty sure people are more likely to frown upon calling a wine not made in a particular region after said region. It's like Scotch. In order for a whiskey to be called a scotch, it has to have been aged in Scotland for at least three years. No ifs, ands, or buts.

Zombie Sammael
07-21-2015, 09:05 PM
Technically only cheese produced in a certain way in Italy can be referred to as mozzarella, but it's very common to find cheese that isn't from there being sold as mozarrella. A lot of these definitions come from EU trade protection legislation, which is iffy to say the least.

And since cheese goes with wine, I'm even on topic.

Khoram
07-21-2015, 09:26 PM
Even better, it's a food! ;)

SauceyBlueConfetti
07-21-2015, 09:49 PM
I need to have a party, invite you all and make you cook for me. Mmmmmmm


Missed you guys. Need to hang more :)

The Unreasoner
07-21-2015, 11:46 PM
You know, I've been thinking about possible fillings for those cheese rolls, and it occurred to me: use the fruit. Maybe a strong soft goat cheese with something drier and more subtle (not parm, but that kind of consistency) filled with a plum relish. Obviously, skip the dried fruit (and maybe the nuts as well, you could add those to the relish). Leave out the sage.

I think maybe you stick with cylinders though, not cones (so as to keep the cheese/fruit ratio constant). Tight cylinders.

Or, fontina and parmesean with sun dried tomato pesto (maybe even mixed with a cold chicken salad, and go with the cones). Pine nuts and basil instead of walnuts and sage.

Daekyras
07-22-2015, 02:43 AM
Man, daek. Even when wine is properly paired with food, you feel underwhelmed? Wow.

I'll give you a recent example. I have some friends who are big wine heads (mentioned before, an irish phrase that means fan/expert).

We went there for dinner about two weeks ago and Greg was dying to let us drink his wine with the steak he cooked. He had the stuff opened for an hour or so before the main and was ready to go.

The wine was a cabernet sauvignon from the Robert Craig winery. I remember as we joked about his name. Craig and Greg are interchangeable over here and his dad is Robert!

Before we even tasted it some people were talking about "new world" wines and inferior tannins etc. That kinda annoyed me.

Anyway the wine was nice. Heavy but not sickly. It did work nicely with the steak. What got me was the "hint of blackberry" and "after tone of pernod" talk. I have a relatively good palette but that is all lost on me.

It did not blow me away. Not like the first time I had a sour rodenboch beer with a steak.

So that is my recommendation to you guys. Track down some rodenboch red ale. Have with your next steak. Amazing.

Khoram
07-22-2015, 09:07 AM
Personally, I'm more of an Old World kinda guy, but I have had some fantastic New World wines, too.

What helps, when you're drinking wine (or any alcohol, for that matter), is to go around smelling things. That way, you will be able to recognize more of what you're tasting, and be able to put a name to it. That was always the hardest part for me - being able to put a name to what I knew, but couldn't find the words for. It helps when you have people knowledgeable on the subject drinking with you, who can help you to figure it all out.

Mort
07-22-2015, 12:46 PM
Alternatively, if you're looking for something simple: microwaved popcorn with truffle butter. Awesome. You can use oil, but most of those are artificially flavored.



I've dabbled with when I'm doing popcorn in a pot (fuck microwave popcorn) I ad a little honey or syrup to the oil or butter just before the popcorn goes in. Shake the pot with a lid on and let it do it's thing. Be careful with burning the pot's bottom, because sugar. Now you have caramelized popcorn. You are welcome. Tastes awesome!

I don't drink any wine (perhaps i should try).

My breakfast is simply bread and nutella :) :)

Bread and nutella. Such a netherlandish breakfast :)

My main breakfast usually consists of yogurt and some musli. Maybe bread with ham.

Scrambled eggs, nothing added to the egg mix but a pinch of salt. Add bacon, slightly crispy.

What we call "Poor knights" over here: Beat some eggs, add a little bit of milk. Dip a few toast bread (not toasted lol) and fry them in a pan until they have a nice color. Add some powder sugar on top (pour some into a fine sieve and shake above the fried toasts).
Eat. I just had some.

I like New Zeeland savignon blancs. With food I prefer red wine, don't have a favorite type.

Need a cool drink for the summer? Have a Lynchberg lemonade. 1 part jack daniels, 1 part triple sec, 1 part sour mix. Mix in a tumbler glass with ice and top of with some sprite or the like.

Southpaw2012
07-22-2015, 01:39 PM
Let's talk food. Enough with politics

Favorite late night snack?

Favorite breakfast?

Tried anything new lately? Recipe or just experienced a new dish?

A friend that lived in Japan for 10 years made me sushi recently. Amazing.

I am on a Moscato kick right now, I could have a glass daily.


Sushi is actually pretty good if made well.

The Unreasoner
07-22-2015, 02:25 PM
Does Europe produce any maple syrup? I thought it was exclusively a North American product. I'm sure we export some, but enough to have it with breakfast with any regularity?

I love French toast and sausage patties for breakfast, with maple syrup on both. But I usually don't bother. A bagel, toasted with cream cheese (occasionally with smoked salmon and egfgs scrambled with sour cream instead); heated leftovers; a protein shake...my typical breakfast is one of those. There's a good bakery that makes an awesome latte and quiche lorraine nearby, but I don't often have time.

Also: Bloody mary is a hell of a cocktail (with double horseradish and tabasco). Spread a little cambozola on the celery stick...awesome.

Mort
07-22-2015, 04:16 PM
Does Europe produce any maple syrup? I thought it was exclusively a North American product. I'm sure we export some, but enough to have it with breakfast with any regularity?



Not sure if any is produced. I think it's mainly a Canadian thing. It's pretty expensive though. Not having it regularly. Pancakes with maple syrup is awesome, but I wouldn't eat it very often because it's not very healthy.

Daekyras
07-22-2015, 04:35 PM
Does Europe produce any maple syrup? I thought it was exclusively a North American product. I'm sure we export some, but enough to have it with breakfast with any regularity?

I love French toast and sausage patties for breakfast, with maple syrup on both. But I usually don't bother. A bagel, toasted with cream cheese (occasionally with smoked salmon and egfgs scrambled with sour cream instead); heated leftovers; a protein shake...my typical breakfast is one of those. There's a good bakery that makes an awesome latte and quiche lorraine nearby, but I don't often have time.

Also: Mojitos are the king of cocktail and a real alternative to normal breakfasts..

Fixed for accuracy.

And yes, there is maple syrup over here. There are two producers in ireland. One of them is actually organic.

Canadian versions are available in most supermarkets for a relatively low cost too.

Khoram
07-22-2015, 05:28 PM
Maple syrup is, hands down, the best sugary treat known to man. :D

Davian93
07-22-2015, 07:41 PM
Maple syrup is, hands down, the best sugary treat known to man. :D

Yes it is and VT makes by far the best maple syrup...our standards sre higher than Canada so while you all make far more, we make it better.

I make my own actually. Usually 2-3 gal each spring.

The Unreasoner
07-22-2015, 08:19 PM
It's summer...what about funnel cakes and other fair food?

I had one once with bacon chunks (as in, not bits from a bag, but fully cooked thick slices someone ran through a food processor) and maple syrup. Someone clearly wants Americans to live very happy (and short) lives.

Khoram
07-22-2015, 08:20 PM
Yes it is and VT makes by far the best maple syrup...our standards sre higher than Canada so while you all make far more, we make it better.

I make my own actually. Usually 2-3 gal each spring.

That's what happens when you become known for something: you start making more of it in order to meet the demand, and as a result, quality dips. And yet, people still buy it.


Although I wouldn't mind trying some homemade VT maple syrup... :D

The Unreasoner
07-22-2015, 11:40 PM
That's what happens when you become known for something: you start making more of it in order to meet the demand, and as a result, quality dips. And yet, people still buy it.
Quebecois...all of American jingoism and European elitism, with almost nothing to back up either.

yks 6nnetu hing
07-23-2015, 01:19 AM
I'll give you a recent example. I have some friends who are big wine heads (mentioned before, an irish phrase that means fan/expert).

We went there for dinner about two weeks ago and Greg was dying to let us drink his wine with the steak he cooked. He had the stuff opened for an hour or so before the main and was ready to go.

The wine was a cabernet sauvignon from the Robert Craig winery. I remember as we joked about his name. Craig and Greg are interchangeable over here and his dad is Robert!

Before we even tasted it some people were talking about "new world" wines and inferior tannins etc. That kinda annoyed me.

Anyway the wine was nice. Heavy but not sickly. It did work nicely with the steak. What got me was the "hint of blackberry" and "after tone of pernod" talk. I have a relatively good palette but that is all lost on me.

It did not blow me away. Not like the first time I had a sour rodenboch beer with a steak.

So that is my recommendation to you guys. Track down some rodenboch red ale. Have with your next steak. Amazing.

I totally agree with you there. pretentiousness can be really annoying. Though, I can be like that about coffee.

Kenyan, medium-dark roast, rough grind, French press... no sugar, no cream, maybe a hint of cinnamon if it's winter... mmm, heaven. I prefer my coffee more Robusta than Arabica (I know it's not fancy, but it's the way I like it), with a nice mellow round sweetness, and the earthiness that you only taste by slow-brewing it, none of the bitterness you get from smashing it through an espresso machine.

Daekyras
07-23-2015, 03:01 AM
I make my own actually. Usually 2-3 gal each spring.

Ah! This explains your re - reading of the little house books. They are a life manual!!

Khoram
07-23-2015, 07:36 AM
Quebecois...all of American jingoism and European elitism, with almost nothing to back up either.

Ugh tell me about it. I'm looking forward to getting away from this place.

Davian93
07-24-2015, 05:30 PM
I totally agree with you there. pretentiousness can be really annoying. Though, I can be like that about coffee.

Kenyan, medium-dark roast, rough grind, French press... no sugar, no cream, maybe a hint of cinnamon if it's winter... mmm, heaven. I prefer my coffee more Robusta than Arabica (I know it's not fancy, but it's the way I like it), with a nice mellow round sweetness, and the earthiness that you only taste by slow-brewing it, none of the bitterness you get from smashing it through an espresso machine.

French press is the only way to make coffee...Keurig machines are a tool of the devil.

Mort
07-27-2015, 10:13 AM
none of the bitterness you get from smashing it through an espresso machine.

I hear the bitterness in espresso is handled by going with good quality beans and a good espresso grinder, and a ton of experience making the damn things. Have a friend who is into coffee making which says so at least.

Me I take it by using a french press, with maybe some milk or not. Mainly because that is the perfect size. Would go with any better type of brewer if I needed to do a lot of coffee. Moccamasters are probably one of the best ones I've tried.

Something really nice is trying it with one of those pressure cookers that you set on your stove and let pressure make all the work for you. Gets really creamy and nice. Just too bad it's usually a pot for just one cup, and I like that second cup of coffee ;)

Davian93
07-27-2015, 10:33 AM
Fun coffee story time: I had a soldier of mine once make the coffee by adding the cream/milk into the machine with the water and then brewing it that way...he "smartly" thought it'd be more efficient.

I made him drink the results as his punishment.

Daekyras
07-27-2015, 01:53 PM
Fun coffee story time: I had a soldier of mine once make the coffee by adding the cream/milk into the machine with the water and then brewing it that way...he "smartly" thought it'd be more efficient.

I made him drink the results as his punishment.

Are you saying the film "a few good men" is based on you? Code red!!!!

Khoram
07-27-2015, 01:59 PM
You old pharts and your coffee. :rolleyes:


When you're young and virile like me, you have no need for coffee. :p

Davian93
07-27-2015, 05:19 PM
You old pharts and your coffee. :rolleyes:


When you're young and virile like me, you have no need for coffee. :p

Wait till you're in the military...you'll see.

Though as a pilot, they'll likely supply you with all the legal amphetamines you'll ever need to stay alert.

Davian93
07-27-2015, 05:21 PM
Are you saying the film "a few good men" is based on you? Code red!!!!

LOL...worst I ever did to one of my soldiers was when he was drinking underage and he had me pick him up as his ride. I picked him up...and then we went for a jog...in MOPP4. I was sober and was fine...he was quite drunk and...well, it didn't work out too well for him.

I think we got 1/2 a mile before he blew chunks.

MOPP4

http://www.446aw.afrc.af.mil/shared/media/photodb/web/090809-F-9083C-004.jpg

Khoram
07-27-2015, 05:34 PM
LOL...worst I ever did to one of my soldiers was when he was drinking underage and he had me pick him up as his ride. I picked him up...and then we went for a jog...in MOPP4. I was sober and was fine...he was quite drunk and...well, it didn't work out too well for him.

I think we got 1/2 a mile before he blew chunks.

MOPP4

http://www.446aw.afrc.af.mil/shared/media/photodb/web/090809-F-9083C-004.jpg

That's a helluva thing to clean out afterwards, too.


And I mentioned it as a talking point in comparing the RCAF to the US Air Force to the Captain interviewing me back in March, and he said that pilots in the RCAF aren't given any legal amphetamines.

Davian93
07-27-2015, 06:33 PM
That's a helluva thing to clean out afterwards, too.


And I mentioned it as a talking point in comparing the RCAF to the US Air Force to the Captain interviewing me back in March, and he said that pilots in the RCAF aren't given any legal amphetamines.

They are in the USAF...and Special Forces as well. And for good reason. I don't see anything wrong with it personally. As long as its done under medical supervision and there is a legitimate need (long-term missions where alertness means living over dying), its totally fine.

He got the mask off before he totally lost it so cleanup was minimal.

Davian93
07-27-2015, 06:50 PM
Back on topic a bit...on wines, I'm a huge fan of wine so I'm probably biased. I go with with whatever wine I'm in the mood for or, if traveling, whatever is the best local wines.

In Provence, it was mostly Rosé for as Khoram mentioned, that's what they do there and having a nice cold Rosé while sitting at a cafe in a Provencal village is pretty much paradise to me. In Napa, it'd be a big red Cabernet or perhaps one of their spectacular chardonnays. In Paris, it was whatever went with the meal. Ireland, we drank cider or guinness because that's what you drink there for the most part.

Lately, I've been on a big Malbec kick...Argentina and Chile have some really good Malbecs and they're nice and affordable which is nice.

Back to Provence, we had a tasting menu at some restaurant (http://rabanel.com/en/) in Arles...we had a dozen different wines with the meal and the Sommelier did all the pairings based on the meal and what wines we had really liked as he went through each course. He did a phenomenal job and none of the wines we had were grown/made further than 30 miles from the city. Just world-class all around and he earned his gratuity that night. Great meal all around other than the dessert where it was pretty weak. Rabanel needs to hire a pastry chef as he's really weak there sadly.

Khoram
07-27-2015, 08:56 PM
We went to a couple of vineyards, and I must say that the Chateau Heyeriès was my favourite. I tried the reds there, and they were really good.

One aperitif that I've learned to love since my Mom first went to Provence a number of years ago is pastis (pronounced pass-tseess). It's licorice-flavoured, like Sambuca, but not as syrupy. You're meant to have it one part pastis to five parts water, on ice. It really is delicious, especially on a hot summer afternoon.

The Unreasoner
07-27-2015, 11:41 PM
It's licorice-flavoured, like Sambuca, but not as syrupy. You're meant to have it one part pastis to five parts water, on ice. It really is delicious, especially on a hot summer afternoon.
It sounds like absinthe. Is it?

And: awesome you're joining the military. I always sort of assumed you were even older than me, but as I have said time and time again on tland: if I only wanted to be proven right, I'd just talk to myself (exclusively, lol). But whether or not Canada wants to admit it: their pilots use amphetamines. But if I were a Canadian in some authority position, I'd be far more worried about your cops on steroids.

Daekyras
07-28-2015, 01:32 AM
But if I were a Canadian in some authority position, I'd be far more worried about your cops on steroids.

It's pronounced horses. HOR - SES Unreasoner.

That's how it works, eh Khoram? All of your policey mens wear bright red uniforms and ride the horsies?

If not than the mid nineties documentary due south really lied to me.

Also, congrats on your military aspirations Khoram. And a flyboy two? If you get in we'll send you a lifetime supply of brylcream! !!!

yks 6nnetu hing
07-28-2015, 01:43 AM
I hear the bitterness in espresso is handled by going with good quality beans and a good espresso grinder, and a ton of experience making the damn things. Have a friend who is into coffee making which says so at least.

Me I take it by using a french press, with maybe some milk or not. Mainly because that is the perfect size. Would go with any better type of brewer if I needed to do a lot of coffee. Moccamasters are probably one of the best ones I've tried.

Something really nice is trying it with one of those pressure cookers that you set on your stove and let pressure make all the work for you. Gets really creamy and nice. Just too bad it's usually a pot for just one cup, and I like that second cup of coffee ;)

yes and no, the beans, roast, grind and proper way of brewing (an espresso is really easy to screw up, even if you know what you're doing) of course makes a huge difference in flavour but the main reason why espresso is more bitter is because it's not brewed as long. The water is pressed through quickly, only releasing the top notes of the bean. i.e. that first punch of coffee-bitterness. Whereas if you use the French press or filter, more flavour is released, the coffee gets more rounded, softer and gains a natural sweetish aftertaste. And more caffeine is released too. (I've had some amazing filter coffee btw, the main reason *that* always gets a bad rep is because it's left on the heating plate for so long and it burns)

This, btw, is one of the reasons I hate Starbucks - aside from their dubious quality of espresso, if I ask for a coffee, what I want is a cup of coffee. Not an iffy espresso with boiling water thrown over it. The water for brewing coffee should actually be 78 degrees Celsius, not 100 (otherwise you burn it, and it gets sour-bitter); which is regulated in most espresso machines; so if you frickin' pour boiling water on top, you just make the espresso worse. And cheat me out of my caffeine to boot. So I get worse taste and less caffeine, to be masked by an insane amount of sugar and fat? no thank you.

Oh, for filter coffees - these are wonderful:
http://shop.ecology.com/sites/eco/products/Chemex_coffeemaker.jpg

Davian93
07-28-2015, 06:20 AM
We went to a couple of vineyards, and I must say that the Chateau Heyeriès was my favourite. I tried the reds there, and they were really good.

One aperitif that I've learned to love since my Mom first went to Provence a number of years ago is pastis (pronounced pass-tseess). It's licorice-flavoured, like Sambuca, but not as syrupy. You're meant to have it one part pastis to five parts water, on ice. It really is delicious, especially on a hot summer afternoon.

Yes, Pastis is quite refreshing and a must-have in Provence.

Davian93
07-28-2015, 06:22 AM
The water for brewing coffee should actually be 78 degrees Celsius, not 100 (otherwise you burn it, and it gets sour-bitter);

LOL...I was just about to post something about that...as in, far too often I see people mess up a french press by bringing the water to a full boil and then dumping it in which turns the coffee bitter.

Other keys with a french press:

1. Use coarsely ground coffee, not fine.
2. Wet the grinds a bit and then pour the full amount of hot water over. Let it sit for 30 sec or so, then stir it and then place the cover on for 5-6 min. At that point, you have to plunge it or it'll turn bitter from over-extraction.


French press is the only way to go.

Khoram
07-28-2015, 08:40 AM
It sounds like absinthe. Is it?

And: awesome you're joining the military. I always sort of assumed you were even older than me, but as I have said time and time again on tland: if I only wanted to be proven right, I'd just talk to myself (exclusively, lol). But whether or not Canada wants to admit it: their pilots use amphetamines. But if I were a Canadian in some authority position, I'd be far more worried about your cops on steroids.

I've had absinthe before, and pastis is not nearly as strong. Nor is it illegal to buy. ;)

Yeah, I'm not too sure about cops on steroids. I know a few cops personally, so maybe they would be willing to divulge some info on that... :D

It's pronounced horses. HOR - SES Unreasoner.

That's how it works, eh Khoram? All of your policey mens wear bright red uniforms and ride the horsies?

If not than the mid nineties documentary due south really lied to me.

Also, congrats on your military aspirations Khoram. And a flyboy two? If you get in we'll send you a lifetime supply of brylcream! !!!

Over seen those people before! I thought they were only for show; I didn't realize those horses were real! :p

Nah, the RCMP doesn't usually wear the riding outfits - that's more for parades, musical rides, civic ceremonies, etc. Think of it as a dress uniform. The Red Serge isn't the only thing they wear.

Seeing as my hair will pretty much disappear once in in, I won't have need for brill cream. ;) It certainly takes a long time, though; I applied a year ago in June, and now I'm not really expecting to go off for BMOQ until sometime in October or November. :/ It sucks, cause I was hoping to be gone in May. XD

SauceyBlueConfetti
07-28-2015, 11:13 PM
It's after midnight and I am awake and hungry

Wait. Déjà vu



Having water and a cough drop. Reading interwebs stuff. Not solving the hunger or insomnia issues



Wait. Flyboy, what's this about the military???

Daekyras
07-29-2015, 03:13 AM
It's after midnight and I am awake and hungry

Wait. Déjà vu



Having water and a cough drop. Reading interwebs stuff. Not solving the hunger or insomnia issues



Wait. Flyboy, what's this about the military???

Are you sick saucy?

I hate being sick. Everything becomes the "man" version. I become a real moaner. It's funny- I have broken many bones and ripped muscles many, many times in my life with never a peep but give me a little cold and I turn into a whiney 5 year old!

yks 6nnetu hing
07-29-2015, 03:27 AM
Are you sick saucy?

I hate being sick. Everything becomes the "man" version. I become a real moaner. It's funny- I have broken many bones and ripped muscles many, many times in my life with never a peep but give me a little cold and I turn into a whiney 5 year old!

bah :( I'm noticing a significant stress increase, which is starting to affect my sleep, appetite and general mood (because of the lack of sleep, mostly). On the up side, there is light at the end of the tunnel, we now have a deadline. On the down side, the deadline is a month away and there's SO MUCH still to do...

(we're moving house. and renovating house. hopefully the renovating will be mostly done before the actual moving, though looking at it now this seems unlikely)

Khoram
07-29-2015, 08:29 AM
It's after midnight and I am awake and hungry

Wait. Déjà vu



Having water and a cough drop. Reading interwebs stuff. Not solving the hunger or insomnia issues



Wait. Flyboy, what's this about the military???

But cough drops are a great source of... of... chewing? Yeah, I got nothing.


I could have sworn I'd mentioned my desire to go into the military before. Hell, I'm pretty sure I got rep from Frenzy for mentioning how awesome the Canadian Armed Forces would become when I'm actually in. XD Even better than what Dav remembers. ;)

Flyboy went through with it and applied to be an actual Flyboy. :p

Figbiscuit
07-30-2015, 10:31 AM
But cough drops are a great source of... of... chewing? Yeah, I got nothing.


I could have sworn I'd mentioned my desire to go into the military before. Hell, I'm pretty sure I got rep from Frenzy for mentioning how awesome the Canadian Armed Forces would become when I'm actually in. XD Even better than what Dav remembers. ;)

Flyboy went through with it and applied to be an actual Flyboy. :p

I knew.

As for wine, I prefer a nice sweet Californian Rose, which over here is considered pretty tacky and what you drink when you know nothing about wine, which is fine with me. Red does nothing for me and white I'll drink under sufferance as long as it's not dry. Echo Falls have started producing a brand of rose wine containing 'summer fruits flavours' which basically tastes like alcoholic Ribena and is my new favourite thing EVER.

Coffee, you can keep.

Chocolate is where it's at.

Nazbaque
07-30-2015, 12:00 PM
I knew.

As for wine, I prefer a nice sweet Californian Rose, which over here is considered pretty tacky and what you drink when you know nothing about wine, which is fine with me. Red does nothing for me and white I'll drink under sufferance as long as it's not dry. Echo Falls have started producing a brand of rose wine containing 'summer fruits flavours' which basically tastes like alcoholic Ribena and is my new favourite thing EVER.

Coffee, you can keep.

Chocolate is where it's at.

Chocolate and red wine are a fantastic combination. You can have a sip and then with the after taste still lingering in your mouth a piece of chocolate reaches completely new levels. Then you have another sip and the wine reaches another level with the after taste of chocolate. Then you just keep going in that cycle of bliss.

Khoram
07-30-2015, 12:22 PM
Creme Eggs are where it's at.

Fixed.

Lupusdeusest
08-02-2015, 09:03 PM
Fixed.

Ew.

*caramello eggs.

Have been eyeballing the 48-packs online; just about worth the $72. Caramello eggs are a weak point for me.

Creme eggs... yeah, not so much, although I made my own this year to great success.
http://www.thelondoner.me/2013/03/lemon-passionfruit-cheesecake-easter.html

SauceyBlueConfetti
08-02-2015, 09:03 PM
Hahaha. He nailed it Fig!

Figbiscuit
08-03-2015, 06:10 AM
Chocolate and red wine are a fantastic combination. You can have a sip and then with the after taste still lingering in your mouth a piece of chocolate reaches completely new levels. Then you have another sip and the wine reaches another level with the after taste of chocolate. Then you just keep going in that cycle of bliss.

I find there's not much chocolate doesn't go with.

Fixed.

He he. Although they changed the recipe since the Muricans bought out Cadbury, and now they are not nice. This makes me sad.

yks 6nnetu hing
08-03-2015, 06:22 AM
I find there's not much chocolate doesn't go with.

herring. Any kind of fish, for that matter. onion, garlic, leek, dill, potatoes, tomatoes, lard... and I can't think of anything else.

Khoram
08-03-2015, 06:42 AM
herring. Any kind of fish, for that matter. onion, garlic, leek, dill, potatoes, tomatoes, lard... and I can't think of anything else.

Bacon, on the other hand, goes with EVERYTHING. :D

Daekyras
08-03-2015, 06:44 AM
When you guys say creme eggs do you mean the chocolate eggs with white and orange fondant in the middle?

Because if you are...ewwwwwww. that is a level of sugary that even I, a confessed sweet tooth, cannot handle.

Khoram
08-03-2015, 07:26 AM
He he. Although they changed the recipe since the Muricans bought out Cadbury, and now they are not nice. This makes me sad.

And yet, according to the all-knowing Facebook, you still consume them. This could be grounds for an intervention, Fig. :p

Davian93
08-03-2015, 10:47 AM
herring. Any kind of fish, for that matter. onion, garlic, leek, dill, potatoes, tomatoes, lard... and I can't think of anything else.

Not necessarily...adding chocolate to chili (a predominately tomato based meal) significantly improves it overall. Remember, chocolate can and is used as part of many savory dishes in addition to its now more common sweet applications.

Khoram
08-03-2015, 11:52 AM
Not necessarily...adding chocolate to chili (a predominately tomato based meal) significantly improves it overall. Remember, chocolate can and is used as part of many savory dishes in addition to its now more common sweet applications.

Like the mole, in Mexican cuisine.

Daekyras
08-03-2015, 12:19 PM
Like the mole, in Mexican cuisine.

Mole has chocolate in it?

I tasted one once- it was just like a thick, badly spiced stew. Not a fan.

I did have some chocolate pork once. It was surprisingly light. Really enjoyed it actually.

Khoram
08-03-2015, 02:23 PM
Mole has chocolate in it?

I tasted one once- it was just like a thick, badly spiced stew. Not a fan.

I did have some chocolate pork once. It was surprisingly light. Really enjoyed it actually.

Yeah. Moles are made with dark chocolate.

SauceyBlueConfetti
08-03-2015, 09:58 PM
Mole is delicious!!!! I have tried to find a good recipe but nothing beats a local Mex place. I can't duplicate it

Khoram
08-03-2015, 11:16 PM
I've never actually tried a mile. I just know what it is from all the observations I make... on the Food Network...

The Unreasoner
08-04-2015, 12:05 AM
I tasted one once- it was just like a thick, badly spiced stew. Not a fan.
Chicken mole is fantastic. Part of me wonders if yours just suffered from 'being thousands of miles away from Mexico'.

It's not overly complicated (though I've never bothered) to make. From what I've seen, just take some chile blend (half of them smoked) and cook them for a few hours with chicken broth and aromatics (mainly onions). Then blend the mixture with peanut butter, toasted pumpkin seeds, a bit of coffee, and melted mexican chocolate (which is basically just dark chocolate with cinnamon). Pour it over grilled or roasted chicken, sprinkle some crumbly dry cheese on top (I forget the name, it's milder than feta), and serve with warm corn tortillas.

Figbiscuit
08-24-2015, 09:36 AM
herring. Any kind of fish, for that matter. onion, garlic, leek, dill, potatoes, tomatoes, lard... and I can't think of anything else.

I dunt eat fish. Or lard. Everything else on that list I'd have no problem eating chocolate with!

Bacon, on the other hand, goes with EVERYTHING. :D

Including chocolate.

And yet, according to the all-knowing Facebook, you still consume them. This could be grounds for an intervention, Fig. :p

Hush, snitch ;)

Chicken mole is fantastic. Part of me wonders if yours just suffered from 'being thousands of miles away from Mexico'.

It's not overly complicated (though I've never bothered) to make. From what I've seen, just take some chile blend (half of them smoked) and cook them for a few hours with chicken broth and aromatics (mainly onions). Then blend the mixture with peanut butter, toasted pumpkin seeds, a bit of coffee, and melted mexican chocolate (which is basically just dark chocolate with cinnamon). Pour it over grilled or roasted chicken, sprinkle some crumbly dry cheese on top (I forget the name, it's milder than feta), and serve with warm corn tortillas.

This sounds AMAZING

Khoram
08-24-2015, 09:38 AM
Hush, snitch ;)

:D