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-   -   What book/books got you hooked into reading? (http://www.theoryland.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=8536)

Rand al'Fain 02-23-2015 12:40 AM

What book/books got you hooked into reading?
 
By that, what book/book series first got you into reading in the first place?

Me, it was Animorphs back in the 2nd grade. Prior to this, all we read were those stupid little stories that never went anywhere, I would end up getting way ahead seeing if the stories actually went somewhere but never did. Then I saw book with the picture of a kid turning into a fly. Read that book (was kind of the middle of the series, but all of them had a little prologue at the beginning explaining how it all began), went and got all the previous books and all the ones currently out, and have been hooked on reading ever since.

Though I will say, I was obsessed with dinosaurs at the time, so outside of whatever books a 2nd grader could find on them, up until Animorphs, I otherwise did not bother with books unless forced too.

Weird Harold 02-23-2015 01:56 AM

I'm old enough that the Dick and Jane readers in first grade were absolutely riveting; I couldn't wait for the next reading lesson. :p

I'm not quite sure which came first outside of reading class, Green Eggs and Ham or Curious George (there was only one Curious George when I first got hooked, not the dozens of books and TV episodes there are now.)

The highlight of First Grade (and every other elementary grade) for me was access to the school library.

Other series that figured prominently in feeding my reading addiction were OZ, Hardy Boys, Tom Swift, Tom Swift Junior, Nancy Drew, Tarzan, Jpohn Carter, Pelucidar, H.G Wells and the entire east wall of the local small town library in my home town -- eg the fiction section.

yks 6nnetu hing 02-23-2015 03:20 AM

Tricky to say - as far back as I remember, I've always loved reading. In fact, my mom says that nobody knows how I learned to read - apparently one moment I just read.

The first book I remember being obsessed about, reading it over and over and over again was the Hobbit; although that must have been when I was... maybe 8 or 9, and I'd definitely read other stuff before then. Mostly fairy tales, we had a huge collection of fairy tales: Andersen, Grimm, folklore tales both local and from the world over. The first book I ever bought from my pocket money was one of the Tarzan stories we didn't have yet. I also read the Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn stories, the Three Musketeers, the first few Narnia stories (because the later ones weren't translated yet, and by the time they were, I'd grown out of them), lots of Astrid Lindgren books - although a few of them were banned in the soviet times (Brothers Lionheart), Alice in Wonderland, Winny the Pooh... those are the more common Western ones I can remember, there were also Estonian children's books and some Russian ones, of course.

Mort 02-23-2015 04:00 AM

The first books I remember reading were Enid Blytons Famous Five series at maybe 9-10? Really liked the adventures as a kid.

Daekyras 02-23-2015 04:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by yks 6nnetu hing (Post 227048)
Tricky to say - as far back as I remember, I've always loved reading. In fact, my mom says that nobody knows how I learned to read - apparently one moment I just read.

.

Awwww, Yks. We've talked about this....:)

I have 5 older brothers so I followed them in my reading.

In fact, I can pin point the exact moment I fell in love with a book/reading.

There were four of us in two sets of bunk beds in our room. I was 8 and my brothers were 10, 11 and 13. (and 2 girls in between those ages. Go Ireland).

Brian was 11 and was reading a book. I asked him what it was about. He then put on a performance as he described in great detail what the book was about. He read the little blurb at the back and put such emphasis on it I was enthralled. I couldn't wait to read it after he was done. That was the first novel that didn't have the Hardy boys in it.

The book was Magician by Raymond E Feist and he was my favourite writer(maybe David Gemmell) until 1991 when I "borrowed" the same brothers copy of The eye of the World....

yks 6nnetu hing 02-23-2015 04:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Daekyras (Post 227050)
Awwww, Yks. We've talked about this....:)

I have 5 older brothers so I followed them in my reading.

hehe, I'm the eldest of three so it's probably not that I followed one of them ;) More likely, it was my dad's typing machine that I used to admire and want to play with... a LOT. Actually maybe because I'm the eldest, I can remember that mom and dad used to read to us - always fairy tales, the ones with pictures were the best. But also adventure stories, I have a very vivid memory of dad reading (what I now know is) the first chapters of The Son of Tarzan to us :D

Daekyras 02-23-2015 05:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by yks 6nnetu hing (Post 227053)
hehe, I'm the eldest of three so it's probably not that I followed one of them ;) More likely, it was my dad's typing machine that I used to admire and want to play with... a LOT. Actually maybe because I'm the eldest, I can remember that mom and dad used to read to us - always fairy tales, the ones with pictures were the best. But also adventure stories, I have a very vivid memory of dad reading (what I now know is) the first chapters of The Son of Tarzan to us :D

Isn't it funny how memories like that can stay with us? My dad never read to us, he wasn't that kind of Dad, but I remember clearly him showing us how to tie our shoes. He had us practice on a door handle and then we had to tie our shoes. It is my first real memory and happened just before my first day of school. Thats my second really clear memory.

yks 6nnetu hing 02-23-2015 05:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Daekyras (Post 227055)
Isn't it funny how memories like that can stay with us? My dad never read to us, he wasn't that kind of Dad, but I remember clearly him showing us how to tie our shoes. He had us practice on a door handle and then we had to tie our shoes. It is my first real memory and happened just before my first day of school. Thats my second really clear memory.

hehe, yes, memories are funny like that. I've a few that are probably a combination of a real memory and people telling me it happened - like, mom reading my favourite story for me and me correcting her "no, read the whole story" - because I knew it by heart and she wanted to skip ahead. I don't actually remember what the text was, I remember pointing at the printed words and knowing that that text went with that picture. But I'm pretty sure that this memory wasn't a single episode, like remembering my dad reading to us. That scene must have repeated many times for it to print itself into my head as I was... maybe 3 or 4 then. On the other hand, the memory of dad reading, I can almost hear his tone of voice and even whole paragraphs of those first few chapters of that particular book. Whenever I read them, I hear my father's voice.

For my reference, how old are kids in Ireland when they go to school? That is namely vastly different in Holland and Estonia - we had kindergarten from 2 until 6 or 7; and then at 7 (in some cases 6) you go to school. In Holland they call it "school" at 4 already.

Daekyras 02-23-2015 05:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by yks 6nnetu hing (Post 227060)
hehe, yes, memories are funny like that. I've a few that are probably a combination of a real memory and people telling me it happened - like, mom reading my favourite story for me and me correcting her "no, read the whole story" - because I knew it by heart and she wanted to skip ahead. I don't actually remember what the text was, I remember pointing at the printed words and knowing that that text went with that picture. But I'm pretty sure that this memory wasn't a single episode, like remembering my dad reading to us. That scene must have repeated many times for it to print itself into my head as I was... maybe 3 or 4 then. On the other hand, the memory of dad reading, I can almost hear his tone of voice and even whole paragraphs of those first few chapters of that particular book. Whenever I read them, I hear my father's voice.

For my reference, how old are kids in Ireland when they go to school? That is namely vastly different in Holland and Estonia - we had kindergarten from 2 until 6 or 7; and then at 7 (in some cases 6) you go to school. In Holland they call it "school" at 4 already.

I was 4 going to primary school which was the norm back in the 80's.

Our two girls were both 5 and our little boy will probably be 6 on his first day. A lot depends on the time of year you were born. Most kids will be 5 in Ireland now as there is a "free" pre school year that was never there before.

I imagine you did tell your mam to read the whole thing. kids are very perceptive of things like that. And maybe you can remember it too. I can gaurantee she remembers it though. :)

Figbiscuit 02-23-2015 05:52 AM

I can't remember my first book, like yks I can't remember a time when I ever didn't read. Mum once told me I read my first book at the age of three sat on a beach, I think it might have been the magic porridge pot? I have no recollection of it.

I don't particularly remember a lot of books or authors which stuck with me from being a young kid, apart from Enid Blyton, and mum worked in the local library which for me was like heaven so I think I ate through that like a .247 bookworm.. As I got older I'd just pick up anything I fancied from her bookshelves, so I read a lot of books which probably wouldn't be considered age appropriate really. I remember I was reading a Time to Kill when I started high school at the age of 13, and that deals with child rape and then murder and hate crimes in a pretty graphic way.

She got me into WoT at about 14 or 15 I think, she encouraged me to read a very wide range of fiction, she encouraged me to read full stop, I think because she was on her own with me when I was young and it was a very easy way for me to be occupied so she could get on with things. I have an awful lot of conversations with friends now about the sheer number of films I just never watched, and they don't get that I always preferred to just sit and read a book instead. Still do.

yks 6nnetu hing 02-23-2015 06:12 AM

right. I think the same applies in Estonia: school always starts on September 1; if you're 7 on or before September 1 then you go to school. However, if a kid gets the say-so from the kindergarten, they may "skip a year" and go to 1st grate at 6 already. I remember there being a discussion about my brother because his birthday is on September 5; and if he'd waited another year, he would have been effectively a year older than almost everyone else in his class.

I went at age 6, and while I was younger than most, I wasn't the youngest in my class.

Then again, back in Estonia, kids are supposed to know how to read and do simple math and write print by the time they go to school. So maybe that means kindergarten is actually the equivalent of pre-school?

but, back to books. For the longest time I used to pick my reading material based on the thickness of the book - the thicker the better. I read Les Miserables at 12 or so; and the three Musketeers, and all of its sequels, and Count Monte Christo, and Solaris, The Moonstone, Marco Polo... I even read Maxim Gorki's "Mother", lol, because I'd already read everything else and that was the thickest book of the soviet propaganda pile which I hadn't touched until then.

SauceyBlueConfetti 02-23-2015 12:17 PM

3rd grade, so maybe 8 years old,the teacher read Charlie and the Chocolate Factory aloud. I was mesmerized and found Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator to read as soon as she finished. Even at that age I recognized the need for MORE STORY!!!!

Isabel 02-23-2015 01:11 PM

I am not sure what book i started reading.
I do know i read 'the letter for the king' by Tonke dragt a lot and read a lot of other books.

Around 10 / 11 i started reading books for adults.

rand 02-23-2015 02:24 PM

The first book I read that seriously got me interested in reading was Harry Potter. My mom read it to me right after it came out when I was something like 6 or 7. After that I started reading and rereading it on my own. Then I got into LOTR, Hobbit, Terry Brooks (I thought Shanara was pretty cool back then lol) and finally WoT sometime around 2001.

I'm sure I read stuff before Harry Potter, but that's the first one that really got me interested in fantasy and reading in general. It's also probably why I still love Harry Potter, since I essentially grew up with it.

Rand al'Fain 02-23-2015 09:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rand (Post 227083)
The first book I read that seriously got me interested in reading was Harry Potter. My mom read it to me right after it came out when I was something like 6 or 7. After that I started reading and rereading it on my own. Then I got into LOTR, Hobbit, Terry Brooks (I thought Shanara was pretty cool back then lol) and finally WoT sometime around 2001.

I'm sure I read stuff before Harry Potter, but that's the first one that really got me interested in fantasy and reading in general. It's also probably why I still love Harry Potter, since I essentially grew up with it.

I think Harry Potter was what got me into Fantasy as well, since the Animorphs series is/was sci-fi. My uncle got me the first two books (all that was out at the time) for my birthday back then.

Sarevok 02-24-2015 10:49 AM

First series I read were the Kameleon and Arendsoog series, but I'm sure I'd been reading before that. No idea what, though. :)

Khoram 02-25-2015 10:03 PM

I started off really reading with the Hardy Boys series. I'm pretty sure I read every single one if them. Then I migrated over to Harry Potter, and absolutely loved them. I also really liked the Shannara books, before I knew any better. :D

One book in particular that I remember reading over and over again was The Hatchet by Gary Paulsen. I had to read it for school, but I would always go back to it. There was something about it that caught my fancy.

Tomp 02-26-2015 10:22 AM

I read The Hobbit when I was ~9 years old and then LOTR when I was about 12. Those are the ones I remember,, I'm sure there were others.

After LOTR I read D Eddings and T Brooks. I really liked Eddings until I read Jordan in the early 90's and noticed all the problems with Eddings books. I never really got into Brooks writing, I just read them because all the other fantasy reading kids did.

I had a two year period of reading Star wars books

After the mid 90's my book consumption was broader with more different kind of books, but that's another story.

Davian93 02-26-2015 12:09 PM

Quote:

and noticed all the problems with Eddings books.
There are zero problems with those books...they are all literary gold.


On a serious note, I recent reread The Elenium for the first time in probably 8-9 years. Those are pretty weakly written which saddens me as I loved them when I was 11-12 years old.

Still, they are miles better than that garbage that Terry Brooks wrote...of which I read most of those too back in the day. I tried to reread one of the early ones (I think it was Elfstones of Shannara) a year or so ago and it was just painful to read. You can walk across his entire "world" in like 5 days for one. Rainbow Lake is so large that you can paddle across it in a few hours. Going from the Dwarf lands to Elf lands on the far side of the map from each other is like a long 3 day journey.

Khoram 02-26-2015 12:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Davian93 (Post 227165)
There are zero problems with those books...they are all literary gold.


On a serious note, I recent reread The Elenium for the first time in probably 8-9 years. Those are pretty weakly written which saddens me as I loved them when I was 11-12 years old.

Still, they are miles better than that garbage that Terry Brooks wrote...of which I read most of those too back in the day. I tried to reread one of the early ones (I think it was Elfstones of Shannara) a year or so ago and it was just painful to read. You can walk across his entire "world" in like 5 days for one. Rainbow Lake is so large that you can paddle across it in a few hours. Going from the Dwarf lands to Elf lands on the far side of the map from each other is like a long 3 day journey.

Maybe they just walk really quickly... :rolleyes:


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