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fionwe1987 12-17-2015 10:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Terez (Post 234840)
Like how I've been telling you?

This is what happens when you miss the crucial smilie. Sorry about that.

Res_Ipsa 12-29-2015 02:17 PM

So... where are the updates?

Terez 12-30-2015 10:50 PM

I was in MS when I started this, helping my mom clean out my grandmother's house after she died, which included getting the rest of my stuff out of that house. Now I'm back in IL, where we've had an ice storm and our power was out for 2 days (and the internet was out for 3). So settle down; I did warn you this series wasn't going to be regular.

DahLliA 01-04-2016 07:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Terez (Post 235036)
I was in MS when I started this, helping my mom clean out my grandmother's house after she died, which included getting the rest of my stuff out of that house. Now I'm back in IL, where we've had an ice storm and our power was out for 2 days (and the internet was out for 3). So settle down; I did warn you this series wasn't going to be regular.

No rush :)

I'd rather you take your time than getting pissed off/burned out and not doing it at all :p

C Rutherford 01-04-2016 10:58 AM

I'm confused. You mean you aren't here to simply do our bidding and devote all your time to satisfy our needs? How strange. An actual life you say? How outrageous. I need to think about this a bit. I am most unsettled.

Davian93 01-04-2016 12:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by C Rutherford (Post 235070)
I'm confused. You mean you aren't here to simply do our bidding and devote all your time to satisfy our needs? How strange. An actual life you say? How outrageous. I need to think about this a bit. I am most unsettled.

I agree...and I am HIGHLY disappointed in Terez here.

Ivhon 01-06-2016 07:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Davian93 (Post 235072)
I agree...and I am HIGHLY disappointed in Terez here.

Seriously. If this keeps up, I may just stop posting in General....

C Rutherford 01-09-2016 01:00 PM

Terez,

I have a couple of questions. Related to your note gathering and research. But only generalities and what may serve as a sort of amuse bouche if you will of what I and others can and I am rather certain do look forward to in your revelations.

Simple yes or no answers. Not looking for specifics in any way.

These can all be simplified in some way by assuming that I am asking in regards to to you having more details than what the Companion contained.

1.Do you know of characters that were not in the books but part of Jordan's lists. For example windfinders with Elayne, Nynaeve and the kin. Or the Kin themselves. Aes Sedai. Etc.

2.Do you know more backstories for characters like what we saw of Cetalia Delarme (the reference to her being killed by the Black Ajah(?

3.Do you know more side stories like the one you revealed for Serafelle being at Dumai's Wells and with Covarla in Dorlan? Or just simple mention of known characters at places or events that Jordan never got to explore in the books but might have had plans to use them in the future?

4.Do you know strength levels for any characters that are different than what we have in the Companion or any that you know other than the ones you have already revealed like Amys?

5.Are you having a good New Year's so far despite the hectic holiday season of last?

Thanks!

Terez 01-23-2016 09:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by C Rutherford (Post 235138)
Terez,

I have a couple of questions. Related to your note gathering and research. But only generalities and what may serve as a sort of amuse bouche if you will of what I and others can and I am rather certain do look forward to in your revelations.

Simple yes or no answers. Not looking for specifics in any way.

These can all be simplified in some way by assuming that I am asking in regards to to you having more details than what the Companion contained.

1.Do you know of characters that were not in the books but part of Jordan's lists. For example windfinders with Elayne, Nynaeve and the kin. Or the Kin themselves. Aes Sedai. Etc.

Yes. Brandon has talked about how some new characters in his books were drawn from the notes. Often there's not much to build on, maybe just a name and location (e.g. at Dumai's Wells).

Quote:

Originally Posted by C Rutherford (Post 235138)
2.Do you know more backstories for characters like what we saw of Cetalia Delarme (the reference to her being killed by the Black Ajah(?

Some, but not much. An effort was made to include all that in the Encyclopedia.

Quote:

Originally Posted by C Rutherford (Post 235138)
3.Do you know more side stories like the one you revealed for Serafelle being at Dumai's Wells and with Covarla in Dorlan? Or just simple mention of known characters at places or events that Jordan never got to explore in the books but might have had plans to use them in the future?

Yes. Again, not much. I asked Maria about Serafelle (which I think I mentioned somewhere?) and she couldn't remember the exact reason that info wasn't included, but she offered a few suggestions including that they might have encountered a continuity problem somewhere.

Quote:

Originally Posted by C Rutherford (Post 235138)
4.Do you know strength levels for any characters that are different than what we have in the Companion or any that you know other than the ones you have already revealed like Amys?

I posted this spreadsheet which I made up for a friend before the Encyclopedia came out. You can mine it for differences; I haven't changed it since the book came out. There are some mouseover notes, but the list is kind of lazily thrown together and based on the combined efforts of me and Dom (probably mostly Dom) from some time in 2014.

Quote:

Originally Posted by C Rutherford (Post 235138)
5.Are you having a good New Year's so far despite the hectic holiday season of last?

Thanks!

My New Year has mostly been forcibly relaxed; I needed a break from work. At first I thought this series was going to be the diversion I needed, but then I got to the White Goddess files and all of a sudden it was hard work. So I got me a real diversion, and I'm good now, and working on the next post. :)

Terez 01-25-2016 06:31 AM

The White Goddess
 
I hope you guys will forgive me for taking so long with this post. Not only did some real life things happen (see upthread), but also I have been dreading working on this post since before I left Mississippi about a month ago (I started the series in MS) because it's so complex—not anything like the file-per-post easy stuff I was outlining earlier.

The last file in Box 4 Folder 2 is entitled SECOND NOTES FROM THE WHITE GODDESS and it's part of its own little series within the notes. Not only is there another file with the same name and similar contents in Box 8 Folder 1 (the next stop for notes files), but there are three additional White Goddess files in 8/1 and then another one in Box 28 Folder 1 (which was probably the chronological first of these files, though there is some evidence it was tampered with after the newer files were created). All of these files have shared content.

I decided that the easiest way to summarize these files is to start with what they all have in common, which is a glossary-type set-up. Sometimes RJ keeps alphabetical order; sometimes he doesn't, but I have kept alphabetical order to make things easier. So the main thing you're missing here is the order of RJ's thoughts, which in some cases might be significant. If you have any questions about that, let me know; it would be tedious to try to represent the context in its entirety here.

There's a big to-do about trees in The White Goddess, something about the ancient mystical language of poetry, and RJ dedicated a lot of space to it, but it ended up not being very important in the books, as far as I can determine. (Maybe Linda or Dom will see something I've missed.) I've tacked on the list of tree types as a separate glossary at the end of the post.

There are a lot of bits that don't really fit into the glossary format. Some of these are inserted in quotes where they can give context in the glossary; others are stuck between the main glossary and the tree glossary. I have tried to arrange those bits thematically.

My use of quote tags is otherwise not incredibly meaningful; everything is a quote, but sometimes I'll give alternately-worded passages in quotes, and sometimes I'll give connected passages in quotes to keep them together.

I actually bought TWG because I was going to attempt to read it and maybe give some context for all this stuff, but unfortunately that sort of thing is beyond the scope of this post, and all I can give you is occasional bits. Clearly, the book was central to RJ's early note-making process, unless he made lots of notes on other books that got lost. But from the content of these files, you can see that the ultimate influence is fairly minor and attributable to many other sources (as RJ himself notes in each file name).

Also important: RJ is not necessarily using his own words in these files. Lots of stuff is copied or lazily paraphrased from TWG and other sources. He wasn't publishing any of this so plagiarism was not a concern; he was just making notes. I gave one long quote from TWG so that you could see this for yourself, but again, it would be tedious to be thorough on that point here and now.

That copying by RJ is part of why I feel comfortable basically sharing everything that is in these six files (joined together as one post). There are later files where I won't do that or even feel compelled to do that because 1) it's needlessly duplicating stuff in the books/encyclopedia, or 2) it's all in RJ's words, narrative-style, and sharing that word for word without permission would definitely not be kosher. But for these six files, you get pretty much everything except contextual order, scholarly certainty, and a few minor formatting things like indentations that don't work well in bbcode.

First, a list of all the files in box order, with the file headings given in bold on top, and then below the file names, in brackets there are the abbreviations that I have given each file to use for citations, plus the total number of pages:

Box 4 Folder 2

NOTES—THE WHEEL OF TIME
SECOND NOTES FROM THE WHITE GODDESS
(With Additional Notes From Other Sources)
[2WG 4/2 - 2 pp. with red ink markings]

Box 8 Folder 1

THE WHEEL OF TIME—NOTES 10
NOTES FROM THE WHITE GODDESS
(With Additional Notes From Other Sources)
[WG 8/1 - 19 pp.]

THE WHEEL OF TIME—NOTES 14
SECOND NOTES FROM THE WHITE GODDESS
(With Additional Notes From Other Sources)
[2WG 8/1 - 3 pp.]

NOTES NO.3—THE GREAT HUNT OF THE HORN*
NOTES FROM THE WHITE GODDESS
(With Additional Notes From Other Sources)
*footer: THE RGEAT {sic} HUNT OF THE HORN—NOTES NO.3
[WGI 8/1 - 7 pp.]

NOTES—THE WHEEL OF TIME
NOTES FROM THE WHITE GODDESS (Part II)
(With Additional Notes From Other Sources)
Filename: WHITEGODDESS1
[WGII 8/1 - 10 pp. with red ink markings]

Box 28 Folder 1

THE WHEEL OF TIME—OUTLINE/BOOK ONE
NOTES FROM®THE WHITE GODDESS®FOR US IN®THE WHEEL OF TIME
(With Additional Notes From Other Sources)
[WG 28/1 - 29 pp. with red ink markings]

The first page of this file was reproduced here. Later the same year, Liz Bourke at Tor.com decided to review a 65-year-old book. Fun coincidence.

************************************************** ********************************************
{My comments in braces because RJ uses brackets; permasic still in effect for "weild", and now add "yeild" to that, though he spells it correctly sometimes and he actually corrected it once from one file to another. Everything below that is not in braces is a quote, whether coded as a quote or not.}

**************************************************
Quote:

Originally Posted by RJ
AT THE BEGINNING OF THE STORY THERE MUST BE PORTENTS OF EVIL. RAIN IS SLOW IN COMING, AND WHAT LITTLE THERE IS SEEMS NOT QUENCH THE GROUND'S THIRST. SIGNS THAT THE CROPS WILL NOT BE GOOD. MANY OF THE®FIRST-BORN®LAMBS, THOSE THAT WILL BE SACRIFICED AT THE NEXT SPRING FOR FERTILITY, GOOD CROPS, ETC, HAVE DIED OR ARE SICKLY. THERE IS A GENERAL SICKLINESS AMONG THE CROPS AND THE ANIMALS, AND EVEN THE LAND SEEMS IN SOME FASHION TO BE ILL. {WG 28/1 p27, big < mark in left margin in red ink}

There are portents of evil at the beginning. Spring seems to be late in coming. The leaves are slow coming to the trees. The spring rains are few, and scarcely seem enough to dampen the earth. Many spring lambs are stillborn. The wind from the mountains is cold, as if it would like to be carrying snow. {WG 8/1 p1, WGII 8/1 p1}

Abarit: {WG 8/1 p16, WGI 8/1 p7, WGII 8/1 p8, WG 28/1 p28}

Aelman: (Aielman?) {WG 28/1 p29}

Quote:

Originally Posted by RJ
The people of the plain speak of themselves as "The Thirteen Peoples (or Clans)" but there are actually twelve. The thirteenth was the people who built the ruined city where their kings (or rulers, at least) are chosen. {WGI 8/1 p6, WG 28/1 p26 with brace in left margin in red ink}

POSSIBILITY: the society of women warriors among the plains' folk are called the Virgins of ________ or some such, thus giving in fact that the hero is born of a Virgin. {WG 28/1 p29, WG 8/1 p15, WGII 8/1 p8, crossed out in red ink with squiggly lines in the latter}

the Aes Sedai (Sedai for short): used as a mark of repect {sic} for Power Weilders, men and women alike, as 'sir' is used. They are called the Aes Sedai, but it is not a title, as such. Sedai can be used alone, as in 'Moiraine Sedai.' Aes Sidhe is an especial mark of respect or formality. {WG 8/1 p1, WGII 8/1 p1}

Quote:

Originally Posted by RJ
the Aes Sidhe (Sidhe for short): [the prime magicians of Ireland] used as a mark of repect for Power Weilders, men and women alike, as 'sir' is used. Not a title, as such. Sidhe alone is sometimes used contemptuously by those who hate or fear the adepts. Aes Sidhe is an especial mark of respect or formality, and may be used by those who are true believers or by those who fear, but always in respectful or awed tones. {WG 28/1 p12}

?????Powers weilders {sic} are called adepts. Among themselves? ????? {WG 8/1 p6, WGII 8/1 p4}

{alt:} Power weilders are called adepts, among other things. {WG 28/1 p12}

Red (a bright scarlet) was the color worn by male Aes Sedai. It is now thought to be unlucky for a man to wear red, though only the Aes Sedai could tell why.
Blue (royal blue) is the color worn by female Aes Sedai.
White is worn by those learning to weild Power who are not yet adepts.
{WG 8/1 p4, WGII 8/1 p2, WG 28/1 p6; in latter, arrows pointing from left margin in red ink}

al'Ordine {WG 28/1 p14, continues where other references begin and stops with "Odin"}: fore-runner of Odin. (?one-eyed goat-herd who rises to become leader and general of axe-men?) {WG 8/1 pp7-8, WGII 8/1 p4}

al'Siris: he will become a corn-king, or barley-king, or oak-king. {WG 28/1 p15}
Quote:

Originally Posted by RJ
forerunner of Osiris: ?????wed to his sister, slain, torn to pieces, yet arose from the dead?????
{WG 8/1 p8, WGII 8/1 p4}

a man who may be considered as fore-runner of the Apollo legend. Golden locust is one of his symbols. {WG 8/1 pp7-8, WGII 8/1 p4, WG 28/1 p14}

Ale'aison Mysteries: part of a religion of the time. Allowed to be known only by women. ??????????????????? {WGI 8/1 p1, WG 28/1 p3}

Alys: {WG 8/1 p16, WG 28/1 p25, WGII 8/1 p8 - crossed out in red ink in the latter, possibly because it was used as an alias for Moiraine in TEOTW}

Amathaon: {WG 8/1 p16, WGI 8/1 p2, WGII 8/1 p8, WG 28/1 p7}

Arainrhod: [castle where men wait to be reborn. a frigid place.] {WG 8/1 p19, WGII 8/1 p10, WG 28/1 p13}

Balorsine: {WG 8/1 p16, 2WG 4/2 p1, 2WG 8/1 p2, WGII 8/1 p9}

bard (or plain-bard): the lowest level of official, or recognized, poet and minstrel. Takes seven years of training in music, prosody, poetic forms, history, etc. Trained in the composition of sagas, lays, love-poems, satires, and lampoons. {WG 8/1 p2, WGI 8/1 p1, WGII 8/1 p1, WG 28/1 pp1-2; question mark to left in red ink in the latter}

Barthanes: {WG 8/1 p16, WGI 8/1 p7, WG 28/1 p29, WGII 8/1 p9; question mark dashed to the left in red ink in latter}

Bran: [a god betrayed by his kin and slain] {WG 8/1 p19, WGII 8/1 p10, WG 28/1 p7}

Brugh: {WG 8/1 p17, WGI 8/1 p3, WG 28/1 p11, WGII 8/1 p9; crossed out in red ink in the latter; used in TFOH}

Carridwen: [a woman's name.] {WG 8/1 p17, WGII 8/1 p9, WG 28/1 p3}

Cenn: {WG 28/1 p15, WG 8/1 p17, WGII 8/1 p9; question mark to left in the latter, then name crossed out heavily in red ink}

Cirri: {WG 8/1 p17, WG 28/1 p11, WGII 8/1 p9; question mark to left in red ink in the latter; name used in TEOTW for the cat at the Stag and Lion; this is a term for a barnacle's legs}

the Covenant: {WG 8/1 p18, WGI 8/1 p7, WGII 8/1 p9, WG 28/1 p28}

court-bard: next level up from an ordinary bard. Plays and performs for nobility and equivalents only. {WG 8/1 p2, WGI 8/1 p1, WGII 8/1 p1, WG 28/1 p2; question mark dashed to the left in red ink in latter}

Cynan: {WG 8/1 p17, WGI 8/1 p3, WG 28/1 p9, WGII 8/1 p9; question mark to left in red ink in the latter}

the Danu: the people of the land ruled by women, and the women of that land (but not the men). {WG 28/1 p8}

Davian: {WG 8/1 p17, WG 28/1 p11, WGII 8/1 p9; question mark to left in red ink in the latter}

Davydd: [a man's name. Welsh.] {WG 8/1 p17, 2WG 8/1 p3, 2WG 4/2, WGII 8/1 p9; crossed out in red ink in the latter two}

Egeria: (woman's name.) [nymph who instructed King Nuna of Rome.] {WG 8/1 p18, WGII 8/1 p9, WG 28/1 p22}

Elffin: a man's name. A slender, small man. {WG 8/1 p17, WGII 8/1 p9, WG 28/1 p3}

Erinin (or Erinine). {WG 8/1 p17, WGI 8/1 p7, WG 28/1 p29, WGII 8/1 p9; question mark to left in red ink in latter}

Ethne: {WG 8/1 p17, 2WG 4/2 p1, 2WG 8/1 p2, WGII 8/1 p9}

Five Seasons: ??? New Year, Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter. {2WG 4/2 p1, 2WG 8/1 p1}
Quote:

Originally Posted by RJ
A year of 360 days (15 months of 28 days each) with a five-day festival between them, counted as not being part of either year, or perhaps as of both. Would certainly be afestival [sic] of death and rebirth. This festival would be held between winter (the death of the old year) and spring (the birth of the new year). 5 seasons of 72 days each? {WG 28/1 pp27-28}

Gad ________: {WG 8/1 p19, WGII 8/1 p10, WGI 8/1 p1, WG 28/1 p3}

Geoffran: {WG 8/1 p17, WGI 8/1 p3, WGII 8/1 p9, WG 28/1 p10; question mark to left in red ink in the latter two}

gleeman: a wandering minstrel and poet, generally also a juggler, mime, story-teller, acrobat, sword-swallower, fire-walker and/or fire-eater. {WG 28/1 p1; arrow pointing from left margin in red ink}

the goddess: a great abundance of hair, flowing and curling about her slender neck and shoulders. On the crown of her head garlands of flowers. In the middle of her head a plain circle, like a slver {sic} moon or mirror, borne up on either side by serpents that seemed to rise from the furrows of the earth, and above it blades of corn. Her vestments of finest linen in diverse colors, somewhere white nad {sic} shining, somewhere yellow like the crocus flower, somewhere rosy red, somewhere flaming. Her cloak was utterly dark and obscure covered with shining black, wrapped round her from under her left arm to her right shoulder, part of it falling down, subtely {sic} pleated, to the skirts of her garments. Her and there {sic} upon the edge thereof and throughout its surface stars glimmered, and in the midst of them was the moon mid-month, which shone like a flame of fire. Round the hem of it was a garland wreathing unbroken of all flowers and fruits. {WG 28/1 p10}

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lucius
[…] First, she had a great abundance of hair, flowing and curling, dispersed and scattered about her divine neck; on the crown of her head she bare many garlands interlaced with flowers, and in the middle of her forehead was a plain circlet in fashion of a mirror, or rather resembling the moon by the light it gave forth; and this was borne up on either side by serpents that seemed to rise from the furrows of the earth, and above it were blades of corn set out. Her vestment was of finest linen yielding diverse colours, somewhere white and shining, somewhere yellow like the crocus flower, somewhere rosy red, somewhere flaming; and (which troubled my sight and spirit sore) her cloak was utterly dark and obscure covered with shining black, and being wrapped round her from under her left arm to her right shoulder in manner of a shield, part of it fell down, pleated in the most subtle fashion, to the skirts of her garment so that the welts appeared comely. Here and there upon the edge thereof and throughout its surface the stars glimpsed, and in the middle of them was placed the moon in mid-month, which shone like a flame of fire; and round about the whole length of the border of that goodly robe was a crown or garland wreathing unbroken, made with all flowers and all fruits. […]

{"The White Goddess" Chapter 4. This is a quote from the character Lucius in the "Golden Ass" by Apuleius, translated by William Adlington and quoted at length by Robert Graves.}

the Green-God: created by men in the Second Age. Can heal any injury or ailment with water from the sacred pool. [EXPAND! BETTER!] Waters are tied in some fashion to the Power. Not only heal, but are source of the Green-God's immortality. Normally cannot, or will not, travel far from the pool. Location of pool not known to men. {WG 28/1 p16}

Guaire: {WG 8/1 p17, WGI 8/1 p5, WG 28/1 p21, WGII 8/1 p9; question mark to left in red ink in latter}

Harran: {WG 8/1 p17, 2WG 4/2 p1, 2WG 8/1 p1, WG 8/1 p17, WGII 8/1 p9}

the High King: {WG 8/1 p6, WGII 8/1 p3, WG 28/1 p10; WGI 8/1 p3 adds: Artur Hawkwing}

Hu: {WG 8/1 p17, WGII 8/1 p9, WG 28/1 p11}

Huan: {WG 8/1 p17, WGII 8/1 p9, WGI 8/1 p3, WG 28/1 p10; question mark to the left in red ink in the latter}

the hundred-handed ones: members of a group who study martial arts that use only hands and feet and staffs. {WGI 8/1 p2; also WG 28/1 p8, with question mark in red ink in left margin; also WG 8/1 p5, WGII 8/1 p3, framed by ????? on each end}

Jah: as a man's name. {WG 8/1 p17, 2WG 4/2 p2, 2WG 8/1 p3, WGII 8/1 p9}

Jaichim: {WG 8/1 p17, WGII 8/1 p9, WG 28/1 p14}

Jon: {WG 8/1 p17, WGI 8/1 p7, WG 28/1 p28, WGII 8/1 p9; crossed out in red ink in latter}

Jura(h): {WG 8/1 p17, WGI 8/1 p3, WG 28/1 p16, WGII 8/1 p9; question mark to left in red ink in latter}

Jur(i)en(s): {WG 8/1 p17, WGI 8/1 p3, WGII 8/1 p9; question mark to left in red ink in the latter; also WG 28/1 p9 with arrow pointing from left margin in red ink}

Kadsuane: {WG 8/1 p17, 2WG 4/2 p1, 2WG 8/1 p1, WG 8/1 p17, WGII 8/1 p9}

Kai: [in early legends, one of the diademed chiefs of battle possessed of magical powers, later listed as being in charge of King Arthur's buttery] {WG 8/1 p19, WGI 8/1 p3, WGII 8/1 p10, WG 28/1 p12}

'kindling': inducing the poetic mood with a luscious prologue about groves, streams and nightingales, then, before mood is dispelled, getting on to subject matter at hand. {WG 8/1 p2, WGII 8/1 p1, WG 28/1 pp2-3}

Lady Day, May Day, Midsummer Day {latter circled in red ink}: feasts and celebrations. {WG 28/1 p2}

Quote:

Originally Posted by RJ random grouping of festival-related things
Lady Day, Bel Tine, Winternight, Sunday: feasts and celebrations. {WGI 8/1 p1}

Lady Day, May Day, Midsummer Day: feasts and celebrations.
Midsummer Day is a water-festival and a fire-festival.
{WG 8/1 p2, WGII 8/1 p1}

Midsummer Day: a water-festival and a fire-festival. {WG 28/1 p15}

Spring-fire: a feast and celebration, in which the furze is burned so that its young shoots will edible {sic} for sheep. Also, the first-born sheep of the previous spring on each farm is sacrificed. {WG 28/1 p5 with note in red ink in left margin: "[?] form"}

The White Goddess, the All-Mother, the Nine-Fold Goddess. {WG 28/1 p2}

feast of the Mother-Goddess celebrated with apple-cider, apples, and kid roasted on a spit of hazel and stufed {sic} with apples. {WG 28/1 p25; unreadable note in left margin in red ink}

solstice: June 22 (beginning summer), December 22 (beginning winter). {WGI 8/1 p1}

Longest day of year= {WGI 8/1 p1}

Longest night of year= {WGI 8/1 p1}

Feast of Candles: February 2. {WG 8/1 p13, WGI 8/1 p5, WGII 8/1 p7, WG 28/1 p20}

spring equinox, when days grow longer than nights, and the sun grows to manhood. {WG 8/1 p13, WGII 8/1 p7, WG 28/1 p21}

Foods for the Spring Festival:
lamb stuffed with apples.
barley-cakes.
apples.
apple-cider.
{WG 8/1 p1, WGII 8/1 p1}

baking of barley-cakes in honor of the Queen of Heaven. {WG 28/1 p24}

At the Spring Festival two girls will be chosen to wear yellow dresses, pretend to be bears, and tun {sic} at the boys attending.
Women will dance at the festival with golden leaves (?what tree?) in their hair.
Maypole.
{WG 8/1 p1, WGII 8/1 p1}

[festival in which two girls dressed in yellow dresses pretend to be bears and run at the boys attending.]
women at a festival dancing with golden leaves in their hair.
{WG 28/1 pp28-29, brace in left margin in red ink on p. 28}

the All-Being: an alternative name for the Creator. {WG 8/1 p18, WGII 8/1 p9, WG 28/1 p16}

summer solstice ritual of sacrifice of oak-king: led to a circle of twevle {sic} stones within which is an oak which has been lopped off into a T-shape. His twelve companions beat him until he faints. (There is a thirteenth who will be his successor) Then he is blinded, castrated, flayed, impaled with a mistletoe stake, and finally hacked into joints on a stone altar set before the oak. His blood is caught in a basin for use. (annointing the stone. annointing the pristesses. {sic} annointing the fields. annointing the people0 {sic} The joints are roasted on a fire of oak, lit from sacred fire, made of oak, which is never allowed to go out, and which came from a lightning struck oak. Joints are then eaten (by whom? his twelve companions? His successor should have some.) Head and genitals are smoked and preserved for oracular use. He then becomes a demi-god of the local pantheon.

Alternative number 1: he is ripped apart bodily by the priestesses, who have roused themselves to a frenzy with herbs.

Alternative number 2: he is chopped into the fields. Or, after the butchery, parts of him are chopped into every field, or perhaps selected ceremonial fields, to insure fertility.

Alternative number 3: parts of him are burned on the sacred fire, and he supposedly ascends with the smoke.

{WG 28/1 pp14-15}

Llew: {WG 8/1 p17, WGII 8/1 p9, WG 28/1 p8}

Logain: {WG 8/1 p17, WGII 8/1 p9, WG 28/1 p12}

Marsu: {2WG 4/2 p1, 2WG 8/1 p1: "(?al'Marsu?)"] [WG 8/1 p18, WGI 8/1 p1, WGII 8/1 p9, WG 28/1 p1: "_____ al'Marse: a famed and feared general.", arrow pointing from left margin in red ink in the latter}

master-bard: highest level. Plays and performs for royalty and equivalents. Social level is one step below that of the ruler's consort, and equal to the highest level of nobility.
{WG 8/1 p2, WGI 8/1 p1, WGII 8/1 p1, WG 28/1 p2; question mark dashed to the left in red ink in latter}

the men of Gebal: [men of the 'moutain-heights' {sic} who worked stone for Solomon's temple. 1 Kings V, 18] {WG 28/1 p17}

Moiraine: the woman weilder of power who searches out Rhys al'Thor. (Moraine {sic} Sidhe) {WG 28/1 p13; arrow pointing from left margin in red ink}

Quote:

Originally Posted by RJ
IF THE POWER WEILDER WHO FIRST FINDS AL'THOR IS AT SOME POINT MADE INTO A CRONE BY THE POWERS OF SA'KHAN, SHE WILL BE A PERFECT PRECURSOR FOR THE HAG IN THE MAIDEN-NYMPH-HAG TRIO. AL'THOR WOULD BE THE MEANS OF HER RESCUE, BUT NOT IN THE SAME BOOK IN WHICH THE DISASTER STRIKES HER. {2WG 4/2 p1, 2WG 8/1 p2}

If Moiraine is at some point (not in the first book) made into a crone by the powers of Sha'tan, she could fit into the maiden-mother-hag trio. {WG 8/1 p15, WGII 8/1 p8}

THE THREE WOMEN OF THE STORY WILL BE PERCEIVED NOT ONLY AS THE THREE WHO TOOK ARTHUR TO AVALON, BUT ALSO AS THE ORIGIN OF THE TRIPLE-GODDESS PERSONIFIED AS MAIDEN, NYMPH AND HAG. {WG 28/1 p25}

Three blind women (the Gray Ones, sisters of the Gorgon), goddesses/priestesses, who have one "eye" between them, which sees all, and which they use for oracular purpose. Also a "tooth," which must be a weapon of some sort. Legendarily Perseus stole these, then blackmailed the three into giving him the location of the Grove of Nymphs, where he obtained winged sandals like those of Hermes, a bag to put the Gorgon's head in, and a helmet of invisibility. He then threw "eye" and "tooth" into a lake to break the women's power.

Hermes gave him a sickle, and Athene (who was the Gorgon's rival) gave him a mirror. He flew to the grove on the borders of the ocean where the Gorgons lived, used the mirror to avoid Medusa's curse, cut off her head with the sickle, and returned with it, pursued by the other Gorgons.

The three women can be seen as the Triple Love-Goddess. and took the form of swans. Also as the Three Fates. {WG 28/1 pp22-23}

the Gorgon's face as a priestess' mask, ugly to frighten. {WG 28/1 p23}

Morvran: {WG 8/1 p18, WGII 8/1 p9, WG 28/1 p3}

Nereis: [a supposed alt name for goddess Artemis] {WG 8/1 p18, WGI 8/1 p3, WGII 8/1 p10, WG 28/1 p15}

Niamh: {WG 8/1 p18, WGII 8/1 p9, WG 28/1 p15}

oak-seer: {WG 28/1 p2}

Ogyr: a mountain people. Moderately short and very stocky, with big noses, men and women alike. Men wear full beards and hair very long. {WG 8/1 p2, WGII 8/1 p1, WG 28/1 p2, continuing in the latter:} Quarreymen and stone-masons, most are. Practice ritual cannibalism in the fashion of the Maori. Other people look on them with a measure of horror for this.

Owein (or Owain): {WG 8/1 p18, WGII 8/1 p9; crossed out in red ink, possibly because Owyn was used in TEOTW; also WG 28/1 p9 with question mark in red ink in left margin}

Plain of Shinar {WG 8/1 p19, WGII 8/1 p10, WG 28/1 p24}

Rhea: {WG 8/1 p18, WGII 8/1 p9, WG 28/1 p15}

Quote:

Originally Posted by RJ
Common folk record their descent patrilinearly. {sic} Women power weilders, and nobles (including royalty) in some countries record thiers matrilinearly {sic}. {WGI 8/1 p2, WG 28/1 p7; also WG 8/1 p5, WGII 8/1 p3, framed by ?? on each end}

In lands where the royal succession is figured matrilinearly {sic}, the king is king by virtue of having married the queen. Their eldest daughter will succeed to the throne. IN some the eldest son is trained to be a general. In most of these lands the king is protected and sometimes even coddled. The amount of their actual power varies widely. In some places they were once victims of the corn-god ritual, but this is far in the past.
Corn-god ritual included {WG 28/1 alt: "possibly includes"} castration with a golden sickle, a version of the tool used in harvesting corn and barley. {In WG 28/1 this ¶ was below the next paragraph, which itself has a big < mark in red ink in left margin.}

[Variation of the myth of Uranus, emaculated {sic} by Cronos, who was in turn unseated by Saturn, who confined Cronos in the custody of the hundred handed ones.]

{WG 28/1 pp8-9; also WG 8/1 pp5-6 and WGII 8/1 p3 which continue:}

version of the legend {only in WG 28/1 pp16-17; other versions start here}: Rhea bore her lover, Saturn, a number of children, each of which Saturn ate, until Zeus was born, escaped, and eventually avenged his brothers by castrating Saturn.

(????) Some lands and peoples follow a variation of the corn-god rituals. [Corn-king, barley-king, oak-king, other names as well.] {WGI 8/1 p3, WG 28/1 p8}

Rhys al'Thor: the hero of the Wheel of Time. The Dragon Reborn. The Hammer. {WG 28/1 p1}

Quote:

Originally Posted by RJ
Rhys must heal the power used by men before the final book. Perhaps he manages to do it in desperation, hoping to provide other means than himself of defeating Sa'khan. {WG 28/1 p24}

the Rods of Dominion: {WGI 8/1 p3, WG 28/1 p16; also WG 8/1 p8, WGII 8/1 p4, framed with ?????}

Rogosh: {WG 28/1 p12}

Rom: {WG 8/1 p18, WGI 8/1 p4, WGII 8/1 p9, WG 28/1 p16}

Rue ________: (or Reu ________) {WG 8/1 p18, WGI 8/1 p3, WGII 8/1 p9, WG 28/1 p16}

Ruidain: {WG 8/1 p18, WGI 8/1 p3, WGII 8/1 p9, WG 28/1 p13}

sacred groves: {WG 28/1 p3}

Quote:

Originally Posted by RJ
Groves of trees have grown in places that were once focuses of Power. Not all of these locations are known, since not all were re-discovered after the Time of Madness. Those places that were used as focuses of male Power during the Time of Madness are tainted. Strange, unpleasant things can happen. The same is true of palces {sic} that were used as focuses of Power by those who supported Sha'tan. Additionally, some places were tainted by Sha'tan's power, either by the Forsaken or by others.
Sometimes men who die there are constrained to remain, slaying all who come. There are other things that can happen, as well.
{WG 8/1 p8, WGII 8/1 p4}

Harming a sacred grove carried a death penalty. {WG 28/1 p22}

Seanchan: {WG 8/1 p18, WGI 8/1 p5, WGII 8/1 p9, WG 28/1 p21}

Sene: {WG 8/1 p18, WGI 8/1 p3, WGII 8/1 p9, WG 28/1 p16}

Talamon: {WGI 8/1 p2, WG 28/1 p7}

Taliesin: [a man's name.] {WG 8/1 p18, WGII 8/1 p9, WG 28/1 p3; ended up being a woman.}

Tammuz: [corn-god] {WGI 8/1 p2, WG 28/1 p7}

Tan ________: {WG 8/1 p19, WGII 8/1 p10, WG 28/1 p15}

Thom: {WG 8/1 p18, WGII 8/1 p9, WG 28/1 p28}

Trees: have a great connection to the Power (WHY? HOW? EXPLAIN!). There are uses to which trees can be put involving the Power. The backlash of Power, however, has weakened the links, corrupting some, so that all this is uncertain. There are sacred groves, regions that are focal points of Power. Unfortunately, there are also forests which protect themselves. The trees themselves cannot harm men, but the Power there has been warped. Men who have died there are bound to remain, and to slay other men who come. {WG 28/1 p17}

Quote:

Originally Posted by RJ
Some ancient weilders of Power were credited with the ability to change trees into warriors and send them into battle.
{WG 28/1 p3; also WGI 8/1 p1 prefaced with "(???)"; also WG 8/1 p2, WGII 8/1 p2, prefaced with "POSSIBILITY:" instead of question marks, followed by note: "PERHAPS TOO CLOSE TO OTHERS' USE OF SENTIENT TREES?" and, in WGII, ultimately crossed out altogether with squiggly lines in red ink}

Tuatha: [Tuatha de Danaan were apparently an early people in Ireland or Wales] {WG 28/1 p11}

Urien(s): {WG 8/1 p18, WGII 8/1 p9, WGI 8/1 p3, WG 28/1 p9 with arrow pointing from left margin in red ink in the latter}

Vron: [head was buried on the White Hill, where Tower of London is now, as a protection against invasion.] {WG 8/1 p19, WGII 8/1 p10, WG 28/1 p10}

Wardens: (alt. 'Warders') men who watch the borders of human lands against the prophecied {sic} return of evil. They are warriors. Each has some abilities that are gifted from the Power, but they themselves have no use of the Power. Each has bonded himself to a female weilder of power. She cannot compel him to obey her, but if she commands in a certain way and he disobeys, the bonding is broken and the gifts lost. These gifts include a 'sense' for the presence of evil, a marvelous amount of self-healing ability, and a retarding of aging. {WG 28/1 p1; arrow pointing from left margin, and "She cannot compel…" sentence circled in red ink}

the Wheel: all things must swing round again forever. One cannot escape from the Wheel. Another symbol of time and eternity, as is the Great Serpent. May have four spokes (representing the four elements of the Power), or five, seven, nine or thirteen. (QUERY NUMBERS!) {WG 28/1 pp15-16}

Quote:

Originally Posted by RJ
QUERY: Should the AGES number 7 (as is in so many legends and myths, and the Bible as well) or 9, which would be a number of magical properties. {2WG 4/2 p1, 2WG 8/1 p2}

The world has seven ages. They are the completion of the wheel of Time. {WG 28/1 p26}

"We shall be the legends of the next Age, the myth of the Age after that, and they in turn are our own myths." {WGI 8/1 p2, WG 28/1 p5}

The myth-tale of Lenn, who flew to the moon on the back of an eagle of fire. His daughter, Salia, flew to the stars. {WG 28/1 p4, arrow pointing from left margin in red ink}

The White Tower: {WG 8/1 p19, WGII 8/1 p10, WG 28/1 p7}

________'s Well: {WG 28/1 p21}

*****{end glossary}*****

spirit, earth, air, fire and water. Fire: sun. Water: moon. The last two are considered the most powerful, the rulers of the year. {WG 8/1 p15, WGII 8/1 p8; WG 28/1 p28 with "spirit (soul)"}

Quote:

Originally Posted by RJ
The Powers used by men and the Powers used by women were (before the corruption of the male Power) alike yet different, complimentary, yin and yang. It is little known that the greatest feats of Power weilding were done by men and women working together, blending their powers. Once the yin-and-yang symbol was the symbol of the Powers. Now the white tear-drop balanced on its point is the symbol of female weilders of Power. The black tear-drop balanced on its base is a symbol of evil.

The Powers have five divisions: spirit (or soul?), earth, air, fire, and water. The Powers of Earth nad {sic} fire were stronger in men than in women; those of air and water more powerful in women. The Power called spirit was equally strong in both. Both men and women, however, have use of all the regions of power. The means and sources, however, are different. {WG 28/1 pp6-7}

Powers.
Dominions.
Thrones.
{WGI 8/1 p1; WG 28/1 p3 (in one line); WG 8/1 p2 (in one line framed by ????? on both sides)}

the Chair(s) of ________: (a geological formation)
the Stair(s) of ________: (a geological formation)
the Tear(s) of ________: (a geological formation)
each of the above could be used with a possessive ('s) instead. {this line WG 28/1 only}
{WGI 8/1 p3, WG 28/1 p11}

A GODDESS WHO LIVES A CERTAIN AGE, DIES, AND IS REBORN, EACH INCARNATION LIVING EXACTLY THAT NUMBER OF YEARS. {WG 28/1 p22}

the appearance of a personage joining battle, a personage glowing so brightly that a king cries out that the sun is rising in the west, to which his priests reply, would that it were only the sun, for it is _______.
A face on which no man can gaze without being dazzled.
{WG 8/1 p15, 2WG 4/2 p1, 2WG 8/1 p1, WGII 8/1 p8}

Man decoyed into a bath in which he may be killed. Other conditions? One version: soul in an apple in the stomach of a salmon that appears in a certain stream once every severn {sic} years, which appled {sic} can only be cut with man's own sword. Check legend of Minos death in his bath at the hands of priestess of Cocalus.
Check Book of Judith, one of the Apocryphal books of the Bible.
{WG 8/1 p16, 2WG 4/2 p1, 2WG 8/1 p3, WGII 8/1 p8}

A mother's perogative {sic} to give arms to her son.
Remember Spartan presentation of shield.
{WG 8/1 p16, 2WG 4/2 p2, 2WG 8/1 p3, WGII 8/1 p8}

the double spiral, which, traced inward, leads to its center and then out again, is a symbol of death and rebirth, a symbol that there is no true end to life. {WGI 8/1 p2, WG 28/1 p8; also WG 8/1 p5, WGII 8/1 p3, framed by ????? on each end}

(????) Peoples to the north driven south in invasion by their contact with the emrging {sic} hordes of Trollocs, Halfmen and the Forsaken. {WGI 8/1 p3}

{Alt:} There are peoples to the north who are driven south in invasion by their contact with the emrging {sic} hordes of Sha'tan and the Forsaken. {WG 28/1 p8, without caps line and using "Sa'Khan"; question mark in left margin in red ink. WG 8/1 p5 and WGII 8/1 p3 use this line and continue:} THIS COME {sic} LATER, AFTER THE FIRST BOOK.

Sayings
From the north the sun never shines.
The north wind brings only snow.
{WGI 8/1 p3; also WG 8/1 p7, WGII 8/1 p4 sans heading}

The sun progresses each year from south to north, weakest at midwinter in the south, reaches northernmost at the summer solstice. {WG 8/1 p7, WGII 8/1 p4}

{WG 28/1 p13 combines the above into one paragraph, sans heading}

the 'Crown of the North Wind' {WG 28/1 p12}: for the ruler of the northernmost kingdom? {WG 8/1 p6, WGII 8/1 p3}

those from back of the North Wind {WG 8/1 p6, WGI 8/1 p3, WGII 8/1 p3, WG 28/1 p12}

'the rising of the Sun, the running of the deer': song {WG 8/1 p13, WGI 8/1 p5, WGII 8/1 p7, WG 28/1 p21}

THIS CAN BE USED AS BASIS FOR A BARROW:
(It is an actuyal {sic} excavated barrow)
A flat-topped round barrow, a quarter of a mile in circumference and fifty feet high. Built of heaped stones (50,000 tons) covered with white quartz pepples. {sic} In a semi-circle around the southern end, twelve stone herms of approx ten tons each, with one more on the summit. A hedge of one hundred long flat stones, set edge to edge, rings the base around. Passages inside constructed of slabs of stone measuring seven feet by four.
Ground plan is in the shape of a Celtic cross. Enter by a dolmen door at base of the shaft, which consists of a narrow passage sixty feet long, through which one has to crawl on hands and knees. Leads to a small circular chamber, with a bee-hive corbelled vault twenty feet high. There are three recesses which form the arms of the cross.
{WG 8/1 p7, WGII 8/1 p4; WG 28/1 p13 sans first two lines}

Cheiron the Centaur, who kept a school. Among his pupils: Achilles, Jason, Hercules, and most of the heros {sic} of the Trojan War. **********(Chei as a title, combined with a name beginning with Ron)********** Cherion was renowend {sic} for his skill in hunting, medecine, {sic} music, divination and gymnastics. Supposedly instructed by Apollo and Artemis. Accidentally killed by Hercules. {WG 28/1 pp24-25}

?????There are gods, or beings so powerful as to be considered gods, beings perhaps in some ways as powerful as Sa'Khan, or possibly even more so, but they are invariably of little or no help. There {sic} aid is withheld, or circumscribed, or more harmful than good, or at best delivers less than was hoped and promised. This is a thread which must run through: mankind must depend on itself, not on the help of all-powerful gods. {2WG 8/1 pp1-2}

Quote:

Originally Posted by RJ
The First Age ended when fire rained from the heavens. The flesh of men melted, and those who did not melt were charred like coals. Plagues, sores, and boils roamed the world, and famine, yet to eat or drink often meant death, for waters and fruits that once were wholesome now slew at the eating. Even the air and the dust could slay. The wind could bring death. Rivers filled with dead fish, and birds fell from the sky. Invisible vapors from the land that slew. Noxious fumes that coroded {sic} men's flesh.

Man stretched forth his hands to the heavens, and seized the stars, and called them his own. The gods waxed wroth over man's presumption, and caused men to war over plenty as if it were the last remnants to be shared among many,

{WGI 8/1 pp1-2, WG 28/1; second paragraph circled in red ink in the latter, with "had" editorially inserted between "Man stretched"; writing in left margin next to first paragraph: "[?] form."}

{Alt ending in WG 8/1 p3, WGII 8/1 p2:}

Man stretched forth his hands to the heavens, and seized the stars, and called them his own. For his presumption man was purged of his greatness, purged of knowledge and abilities, reduced to an animal to begin again the climb to the Light.

Perhaps only the last part is 'known,' through legend and story.

The serpent as a symbol of man. If men who oppose Sha'tan use the Great Serpent as a banner symbol? {WG 8/1 p3, WGII 8/1 p2}

A goddess wearing a belt of acorns and a necklace of msitletoe {sic}, holding a serpent in her left hand.
The serpent as a symbol of man.
{WG 28/1 p4}

The Great Serpent that eats its own tail, and is the symbol of time, and of eternity.
Time is a closed circle, each age coming again in turn, changed and yet the same, like and yet different, from what it was when it previously was. {WGI 8/1 p2, WG 28/1 p5}

Sha'tan will tear loose the Great Serpent's grip on its own tail. He will end the ceaseless cycles of Time; the Serpent will die. Sha'tan can use the powers that come from death. The death of Time itself will loose such powers that the Dark One will be able to remake the universe (creation) in his own image. {WG 8/1 pp4-5, WGII 8/1 pp2-3, WG 28/1 p6; the latter reads "Sa'Khan"}

Shai'tan: {WGI 8/1 only}
The Dark One.
The Render of Souls.
Heartsbane.
Bloodfang.
Lord of the Ravens.
Bonebreaker.
Lord Dread {? in WG 8/1, WGII 8/1, WG 28/1}
The Dread One {WG 8/1, WGII 8/1 only}
The Lord of Dread {WG 8/1, WGII 8/1 only}
Father of Lies {WGI 8/1 only}
Lord of the Grave. {WGI 8/1 only}
[HIS TRUS {sic} NAME,®SA'KHAN®IS VERY UNLUCKY TO SAY] {WG 28/1 only}
Sha'tan is called by followers 'the Great Lord of the Dark.' {WG 8/1, WGII 8/1, WG 28/1 only; the latter lacks quotation marks and begins "He is called…"}
{WG 8/1 p4, WGI 8/1 p2, WGII 8/1 p2; WG 28/1 pp5-6, all in one line}

Black hounds with eyes and feet of flame. Their breath is icy-, deathly-cold. {WG 8/1 p5, WGI 8/1 p2, WGII 8/1 p3, WG 28/1 p7}

Ravens were one of the creatures that fell under the sway of the Evil One.
They are still thought to be unlucky, and some, in fact, are his spies.
{WG 8/1 p4, WGII 8/1 p2, WG 28/1 p6; in latter, arrow pointing from left margin in red ink}

Kingfisher: female believed to cary {sic} her dead mate to sea on her back. Believed to ward off bad weather. startling bright blue and white plummage. {sic} {WG 8/1 p13, WGI 8/1 p5, WGII 8/1 p7, WG 28/1 p20 with question mark in left margin in red ink}

owl associated with death. {WGI 8/1 p6, WG 28/1 p22}

Owl as a symbol of death and treachery, a bird to be distrusted. [Legend of Llew Law Gyffes.] {WG 8/1 p16, 2WG 4/2 p1, 2WG 8/1 p2, WGII 8/1 p8}

Cranes and swans are sacred birds. Willows are sacred to the goddess, and cranes are thought to breed in willow groves. {WG 8/1 p13, WGI 8/1 p6, WGII 8/1 p7, WG 28/1 p23}

black doves: oracular {WG 8/1 p13, WGI 8/1 p5, WGII 8/1 p7, WG 28/1 p21}

ability to take omens from the flight of birds. {WG 8/1 p13, WGII 8/1 p7, WG 28/1 p23}

Wren considered a prophetic bird. Unlucky to kill a wren or take its eggs. {WG 8/1 p13, WGI 8/1 p5, WGII 8/1 p7, WG 28/1 p20 with question mark in left margin in red ink}

[Raven considered a prophetic bird] {WG 8/1 p13, WGI 8/1 p5; WGII 8/1 p7, WG 28/1 p20}

Flights of crows much observed by augurs. {WG 8/1 p13, WGII 8/1 p7, WG 28/1 p9}

?????The Aes Sedai are contemptuous of such things as telling the future by flights of birds, but many people bel;ieve.????? {WG 8/1 p13, WGII 8/1 p7}

Haruspices. [Haruspexes?] {WG 28/1 p9}

the Cards of the Wheel: Tarot. {WG 8/1 p13, WGII 8/1 p7, WG 28/1 p27}

Heads of dead men caused to become oracles. {WG 8/1 p6, WGII 8/1 p3, WG 28/1 p11}

Oracle sitting on a tripod over a vent from which fumes arise. {WG 28/1 p7}

Oracular drink of goat's milk and honey, drunk at dawn in the oracular cave. {WG 8/1 p15, WGII 8/1 p8, WG 28/1 p28}

'sealed with thirteen locks and locked with thirteen locks' {WG 8/1 p6, WGI 8/1 p3, WGII 8/1 p3, WG 28/1 p11}

the power of Death-in-Life and Life-in-Death. {WG 8/1 p6, WGI 8/1 p3, WGII 8/1 p3, WG 28/1 p12}

the sacrifice of white bulls {WGI 8/1 p3, WG 28/1 p13}

the V-symbol (and the delta?) symbolic of women, or perhaps sacred to a goddess. {WGI 8/1 p7, WG 28/1 p27}

a wind called "the Breath of ________>" {WGI 8/1 p7, WG 28/1 p28}
a hot wind called "the Breath of the Dragon" {WG 8/1 p18, WGII 8/1 p9}

the spirit of hinges and other things that connect and hold together. {WG 28/1 p9}

Kali wore a necklace of fifty skulls. {WG 28/1 p24}

Sailors tattooed with a star between thumb and forefinger of the left hand. {WG 8/1 p14, WGII 8/1 p7; WG 28/1 p22 with arrow pointing from left margin in red ink}

The myth of the man, heir to kingship, who slays his father, the king, at the urging of his patroness-goddess. {WG 8/1 p14, WGII 8/1 p7, WG 28/1 pp22-23}

the golden apple of immortality and wisdom. {WG 8/1 p14, WGII 8/1 p7, WG 28/1 p25}

apple as symbol of knowledge {WG 8/1 p12, WGII 8/1 p6, WG 28/1 p25}

wine made from blackberries is heady. {WG 8/1 p12, WGI 8/1 p5, WGII 8/1 p6; WG 28/1 p20 with question mark in left margin in red ink}

Pigs fed on acorns. {WG 8/1 p12, WGII 8/1 p7, WG 28/1 p22}

the seven pillars of widsom.
thirteen pillars, then seven pillars, then two.
{WG 8/1 p14, WGII 8/1 p7, WG 28/1 pp25-26}

the Bull-Footed God. {WG 8/1 p16, 2WG 4/2 p1, 2WG 8/1 p2, WGII 8/1 p8}

the heel as a site of vulnerability. {2WG 4/2 p1, 2WG 8/1 p2}

thumb: phallic
fore-finger: luck
middle finger: the fool's finger. (Also associated with sexuality, lust, etc. "Smelter of woman's passion.") Pointed at man as a sign of cuckoldry.
third finger: finger of physic, or healing.
little finger: oracular finger.
{WG 8/1 p14, WGI 8/1 p6, WGII 8/1 p7; WG 28/1 p24 with brace connecting these notes in left margin in red ink}

amethyst: a charm against drunkenness. {WGI 8/1 p6; WG 8/1 p14; WGII 8/1 p7, WG 28/1 p26: called "wine-stone" with [amethyst] added at end; latter file has arrow pointing from left margin in red ink}

white carnelian and yellow cairngorm {WGI 8/1 p6}: associasted {sic} with the hottest months. {WG 8/1 p14, WGII 8/1 p7, WG 28/1 p26}

banded red agate {WGI 8/1 p6}: associated with month before grapes are harvested. {WG 8/1 p14, WGII 8/1 p8, WG 28/1 p26}

blood-red carbuncle {WGI 8/1 p6}: the month of raiding. {WG 8/1 p14, WGII 8/1 p8, WG 28/1 p26}

lapis lazuli {WGI 8/1 p6}: the blue sky and the first month of summer. {WG 8/1 p15, WGII 8/1 p8, WG 28/1 p26}

light green jasper and dark green malachite {WGI 8/1 p6}: months of rain. {WG 8/1 p15, WGII 8/1 p8, WG 28/1 p26}

bright red fire-garnet {WGI 8/1 p7}: month of the Spring Equinox. {WG 8/1 p15, WGII 8/1 p8, WG 28/1 p26}

rusty-red sard {WGI 8/1 p7}: first month of the year. {WG 8/1 p15, WGII 8/1 p8, WG 28/1 p27}

green beryl {WGI 8/1 p7, "sea-green"}: the sea. {WG 8/1 p15, WGII 8/1 p8}

red sard {WGI 8/1 p7}

yellow chrysolite {WGI 8/1 p7}

fire-garnet {WGI 8/1 p7}

yellow serpentine {WGI 8/1 p7}

A medallion made of silver, gold, tin, lead, and copper. Possibly set with thirteen gems: red sard, yellow chrysolite, sea-green beryl, fire-garnet, blood-red carbuncle, lapis lazuli, white carnelian, yellow cairngorm, banded red agate, amethyst, yellow serpentine, clear green jasper and dark green malachite. {WG 28/1 p27}

birch tree: rods used to beat out evil spirits. Twigs do not toughen until late in the year (nor do those of willow or rowan). Tree of inception. First tree after the elder to put out new leaves. Its leafing marks the beginning of planting season [April 1 in England]. {WGI 8/1 p4, WG 28/1 p17; WG 8/1 p8, WGII 8/1 p4 prefaced by *****}

Quote:

Originally Posted by RJ
cradles made from birch for luck. {WG 8/1 p12, WGI 8/1 p5, WGII 8/1 p6; WG 28/1 p20 with question mark in left margin in red ink}

rowan: also called quickbeam, or mountain ash. {underlining in WG 8/1 p8 only} White flowers. Used as a prophylactic against lightning and witches. A bewitched horse can only be controlled with a whip of rowan. Fires of roward used to summon spirits. Berries of the rowan supposedly had the sustaining ability of nine meals, healed the wounded, and added a year to a man's life. Rowan berries, apples and red nut are described as the food of the gods. The tree of quickening. Wands for metal divining made of rowan. A rowan stake hammered through a corpse would immobilize its ghost. {WG 8/1 pp8-9, WGI 8/1 p4, WGII 8/1 p5; WG 28/1 pp17-18 with question mark in left margin in red ink}

ash: [sacred to Poseiden] wood is a charm against drowning. Tree of re-birth. [the Three Norns of Sandinavian {sic} legend, the Triple Goddess, dispensed justice under an ash] [Ygdrasill, sacred to Odin, was an ash, and was his steed] Has power over horses. Its shade is harmful to grass or corn.
{WGI 8/1 p4; WG 8/1 p9, WGII 8/1 p5 prefaced by *****; WG 28/1 p18 with question mark in left margin in red ink}

ash: used for spear shafts. {WGI 8/1 p2, WG 28/1 p5 with arrow pointing from left margin in red ink}

alder: grow by riversides. shade is beneficial to crops. Poor fuel, but yeilds the best charcoal. Proof against the corruptive influences of water. Indeed, it is longlasting as dock pilings. Green alder branches make good whistles (also pipes, as pan-pipes0. {sic} Such whistles were used by witches to summon up destructive winds. Used for making milk-pails and other dairy vessels. Alder, white poplar and cypress are trees of resurrection. Yeilds {corrected in WGII} three fine dyes: red from bark, green from flowers, brown from twigs (typifying fire, water and earth). When felled, the wood, at first white, seems to bleed crimson. Its buds are set in a spiral, symbolic of resurrection. {WG 8/1 p9, WGI 8/1 p4, WGII 8/1 p5, WG 28/1 p18}

willow: (or osier) Connected with death and the moon. [connected with witches, who worshipped it] Wicker is woven from willow, properly. [Druidic human sacrifices were held in wicker baskets] Tree loves water. Leaves and bark are sovereign against rheumatic cramps. Tree of eloquence, sacred to poets. Tree of enchantment. {WGI 8/1 p4; WG 8/1 p10, WGII 8/1 p5 prefaced by *****; WG 28/1 pp18-19 with question mark in left margin in red ink}

whitethorn: (or hawthorn) Unlucky. Cutting an ancient whitethorn brings disaster, the death of one's cattle and children, the loss of one's money.
{WG 8/1 p10, WGI 8/1 pp2,4 (combined); WGII 8/1 p5; WG 28/1 p5 with arrow pointing from left margin in red ink; WG 28/1 p19 with question mark in left margin in red ink (combined}rom left margin in red ink}

oak: associated with thunder. sacred fires fueled with oak. Guardian and door. Symbol of endurance and triumph. {WGI 8/1 p4; WG 8/1 p10, WGII 8/1 p5 prefaced by *****; WG 28/1 p19 with question mark in left margin in red ink}

oak: symbol of wisdom and strength. {WGI 8/1 p2, WG 28/1 p5 with arrow pointing from left margin in red ink}

holly: flowers in June. white flowers and red berries. sharp prickles and bitter bark. Tree of murder. {WGI 8/1 p5; WG 8/1 p10, WGII 8/1 p5 prefaced by *****; WG 28/1 p19 with question mark in left margin in red ink}

hazel: sweet nuts in a hard shell. Associated with beauty, wisdom and knowledge. Forked hazel stick used for diving buried treasure, water, rod. Supposedly drips a poisonous milk. Supposedly wood gave off a noxious and poisonous vapor. White hazel wands associated with judgement. {WGI 8/1 p5; WG 8/1 p10, WGII 8/1 p5 prefaced by *****; WG 28/1 p19 with question mark in left margin in red ink}

grape vine: joy, exhileration {sic} and wrath. resurrection. {WGI 8/1 p5; WG 8/1 p10, WGII 8/1 p6 prefaced by *****; WG 28/1 p19 with question mark in left margin in red ink}

ivy: (flowering) (yellow-beried {sic} ivy honored Dionysius) resurrection. Chewed for toxic affect {sic?} can induce a frenzy. Flowers visited by last bees of the year. {WGI 8/1 p5; WG 8/1 p11, WGII 8/1 p6 prefaced by *****; WG 28/1 p19 with question mark in left margin in red ink}

elder: waterside tree associated with witches. Associated with death. White flowers, best at midsummer. Burning elder will 'bring the devil into the house.' Tree of doom.
Notoriously bad fuel, but a remedy for fevers, scalds and burns.
{WG 28/1 p5 with arrow pointing from left margin in red ink; WG 28/1 p20 with question mark in left margin in red ink (combined); WGI 8/1 p5, WGI 8/1 pp2 (combined); WG 8/1 p11, WGII 8/1 p6, WGII 8/1 p6}

cornel: (or dogwood) crows feed on its red berries. Yields a red dye. Used for javelin shafts [Rommulus' javelin, used to determine site of founding of Rom, had such a shaft] {WG 8/1 p11, WGI 8/1 p5, WGII 8/1 p6, WG 28/1 p20 with question mark in left margin in red ink}

laurel: an oracular tree {WG 8/1 p12, WGI 8/1 p5, WGII 8/1 p6, WG 28/1 p20 with question mark in left margin in red ink}

silver fir: considered female. connected with child-birth. likes sandy soil and sea breezes. {WG 8/1 p11, WGI 8/1 pp5-6, WGII 8/1 p6, WG 28/1 p21}

furze: (or gorse) prickles and golden flowers. Furze-fires lighted on the hills at the spring equinox. Burning encourages growth of grass and burns away old prickles, making tender new sprouts grow as food for the sheep. Flowers frequented by first bees of the year. 'good against witches' {WG 8/1 pp11-12, WGI 8/1 p6, WGII 8/1 p6, WG 28/1 p21}

heather: [sacred to Venus and to Isis] Midsummer tree, red and passionate, associated with mountains and bees. White heather is lucky, being a protection against acts of passion. {WG 8/1 p12, WGI 8/1 p6, WGII 8/1 p6; WG 28/1 pp21-22 with question mark in left margin in red}

aspen: (or white poplar) Tree of the autumn equinox and of old age. the shield maker's tree. {WG 8/1 p12, WGI 8/1 p6, WGII 8/1 p6, WG 28/1 p22}

yew: the death tree. Bulls to be sacrificed wreathed in yew. Seasoned and polished, it will not rot for a very long time. {WG 8/1 p12, WGI 8/1 p6, WGII 8/1 p6; WG 28/1 p22 with question mark in red in left margin}

blackthorn: carried as a walking stick by witches, believed to casue miscariages {sic}. Blackthorn used as walking sticks by many, and as cudgel-staffs, but also believed to be used in magic.
{WG 8/1 p11, WGI 8/1 p6; WGII 8/1 p6, WG 28/1 p25 with minor differences; the latter has a correction of "casue" in red ink}

blackthorn and yew: symbols of strength, masculinity and war. {WG 8/1 p12, WGI 8/1 p2, WGII 8/1 p6, WG 28/1 p5 with arrow pointing from left margin in red ink}

primrose: a symbol of wantonness and dalliance. {WG 8/1 p3, WGI 8/1 p2, WGII 8/1 p2, WG 28/1 p5 with arrow pointing from left margin in red ink}

wild-apple: thought to have power in love-charms adn aphrodasiacs. {sic} {WG 8/1 p3, WGI 8/1 p2, WGII 8/1 p2, WG 28/1 p5 with arrow pointing from left margin in red ink}

fionwe1987 01-25-2016 12:27 PM

MAIDEN-NYMPH-HAG trio:

Who are these? I can see Hag for Cadsuane, maybe Nymph for Nynaeve, but Maiden doesn't really fit Moiraine. It fits Egwene, but she doesn't quite play a role that is contiguous with Nynaeve and Cadsuane. Thoughts?

Terez 01-25-2016 12:50 PM

I doubt RJ worried much about following this parallel in the end. Most of this stuff didn't end up in the books in the way that he seems to have originally intended. That said, Moiraine isn't really a bad fit for the Maiden. She was a virgin, unless you count Siuan (and knowing the way RJ thought about this sort of thing, he probably didn't count Siuan). Moiraine was a virgin for longer than Nynaeve was.

Kimon 01-25-2016 04:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Terez (Post 235430)
I doubt RJ worried much about following this parallel in the end. Most of this stuff didn't end up in the books in the way that he seems to have originally intended. That said, Moiraine isn't really a bad fit for the Maiden. She was a virgin, unless you count Siuan (and knowing the way RJ thought about this sort of thing, he probably didn't count Siuan). Moiraine was a virgin for longer than Nynaeve was.

The idea of the Triple Goddess usually tends to be linked with the Moon Goddess in three forms - Artemis (maiden), Selene (nymph - literally the moon), Hekate (crone/witch). Sometimes with Hera or Athena, though. Sometimes with the three goddesses of the Judgment of Paris - Hera, Athena, and Aphrodite. That last would be more queen, maiden, whore though than maiden, nymph, crone. I'd have to think that it should at least include Moiraine and Lanfear. He even had Lanfear take the alias Selene, and associated her with the Moon. Lanfear also pretended to be a crone - Sylvie. The third seems less clear. Maybe Egwene. Maybe he originally had in mind though Morgase (queen), Moiraine (maiden), Lanfear (whore).

The Unreasoner 01-25-2016 08:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Terez (Post 235421)
Arainrhod: [castle where men wait to be reborn. a frigid place.] {WG 8/1 p19, WGII 8/1 p10, WG 28/1 p13}

*erhem*

Quote:

Originally Posted by Terez (Post 235421)
Vron: [head was buried on the White Hill, where Tower of London is now, as a protection against invasion.] {WG 8/1 p19, WGII 8/1 p10, WG 28/1 p10}

Lmfao. "They watched for the wrong thing, and forgot when they should have been remembering"

Quote:

Originally Posted by Terez (Post 235421)
A GODDESS WHO LIVES A CERTAIN AGE, DIES, AND IS REBORN, EACH INCARNATION LIVING EXACTLY THAT NUMBER OF YEARS. {WG 28/1 p22}

Egwene? I still don't know why she died.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Terez (Post 235421)
?????There are gods, or beings so powerful as to be considered gods, beings perhaps in some ways as powerful as Sa'Khan, or possibly even more so, but they are invariably of little or no help. There {sic} aid is withheld, or circumscribed, or more harmful than good, or at best delivers less than was hoped and promised. This is a thread which must run through: mankind must depend on itself, not on the help of all-powerful gods. {2WG 8/1 pp1-2}

The Finn?

Quote:

Originally Posted by Terez (Post 235421)
the Cards of the Wheel: Tarot. {WG 8/1 p13, WGII 8/1 p7, WG 28/1 p27}

I may need to reread Mat's first scene in TSR...and Siuan's in NS.

Terez 01-25-2016 09:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Unreasoner (Post 235444)
Lmfao. "They watched for the wrong thing, and forgot when they should have been remembering"

Good catch.

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Unreasoner (Post 235444)
The Finn?

More like the Heroes, or even the Creator.

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Unreasoner (Post 235444)
I may need to reread Mat's first scene in TSR...and Siuan's in NS.

It's definitely Tarot. Five suits, etc.

fionwe1987 01-25-2016 10:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Terez (Post 235430)
I doubt RJ worried much about following this parallel in the end. Most of this stuff didn't end up in the books in the way that he seems to have originally intended. That said, Moiraine isn't really a bad fit for the Maiden. She was a virgin, unless you count Siuan (and knowing the way RJ thought about this sort of thing, he probably didn't count Siuan). Moiraine was a virgin for longer than Nynaeve was.

Hmmm... we're saying Moiraine was a virgin as of EotW? Somehow I highly doubt that. I mean, she was quite the prude in NS with Siuan having fun with the servant, but I certainly hope RJ didn't write her as someone who never overcame that.

And great catch on Vron!

As for moon goddesses, Egwene and Lanfear are the best matches. Good point that he may not have stuck to these mythological parallels perfectly..

Terez 01-25-2016 10:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fionwe1987 (Post 235451)
Hmmm... we're saying Moiraine was a virgin as of EotW? Somehow I highly doubt that. I mean, she was quite the prude in NS with Siuan having fun with the servant, but I certainly hope RJ didn't write her as someone who never overcame that.

I'm pretty sure it's confirmed in her thoughts, as it was with all the main ladies. I'll look for it later.

fionwe1987 01-25-2016 10:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Terez (Post 235452)
I'm pretty sure it's confirmed in her thoughts, as it was with all the main ladies. I'll look for it later.

I must have blanked it out. It is disappointing, if so. He had no issues showing us that some Reds had sex lives with men. Why in the world have all your major adult characters not have one too? Lan is clearly implied to have a sex life, so I'd be quote disappointed if it turns out Moiraine did not, as well.

Terez 01-25-2016 10:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fionwe1987 (Post 235453)
I must have blanked it out. It is disappointing, if so. He had no issues showing us that some Reds had sex lives with men. Why in the world have all your major adult characters not have one too? Lan is clearly implied to have a sex life, so I'd be quote disappointed if it turns out Moiraine did not, as well.

Because virginity is an ideal for a lot of men. RJ went out of his way to confirm the virginity of all Rand's women, even Min. Perrin got a virgin too, and Mat, and Thom and Bryne too. The only significant other who wasn't a virgin was Berelain, and I'm not entirely sure RJ intended her to end up with Galad. But either way, no virgin was in store for Galad; it was either Berelain or Egwene, who would have been pregnant with Gawyn's child. Kind of ironic that Mr. Pure was the only one to get robbed of his virgin.

fionwe1987 01-25-2016 10:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Terez (Post 235454)
Because virginity is an ideal for a lot of men. RJ went out of his way to confirm the virginity of all Rand's women, even Min. Perrin got a virgin too, and Mat, and Thom and Bryne too. The only significant other who wasn't a virgin was Berelain, and I'm not entirely sure RJ intended her to end up with Galad. But either way, no virgin was in store for Galad; it was either Berelain or Egwene, who would have been pregnant with Gawyn's child. Kind of ironic that Mr. Pure was the only one to get robbed of his virgin.

I know Min was confirmed a virgin, and Elayne, of course, but where do we find that about Aviendha? And Siuan? I'm pretty sure no Siuan quote exists proving she's a virgin, but maybe I blanked that one out too.


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